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1
General discussion / Re: Syria
« Last post by seafoid on Today at 07:26:16 AM »
Regime change in Syria鉾ood for Israel; good for the U.S.

Hillary Clinton Email Archive

https://wikileaks.org/clinton-emails/emailid/18328
覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧蘭

UNCLASSIFIED U.S. Department of State Case No. F-2014-20439 Doc No. C05794498 Date: 11/30/2015 RELEASE IN FULL

The best way to help Israel deal with Iran痴 growing nuclear capability is to help the people of Syria overthrow the regime of Bashar Assad.

Negotiations to limit Iran痴 nuclear program will not solve Israel痴 security dilemma. Nor will they stop Iran from improving the crucial part of any nuclear weapons program the capability to enrich uranium. At best, the talks between the world痴 major powers and Iran that began in Istanbul this April and will continue in Baghdad in May will enable Israel to postpone by a few months a decision whether to launch an attack on Iran that could provoke a major Mideast war. Iran痴 nuclear program and Syria痴 civil war may seem unconnected, but they are. For Israeli leaders, the real threat from a nuclear-armed Iran is not the prospect of an insane Iranian leader launching an unprovoked Iranian nuclear attack on Israel that would lead to the annihilation of both countries.

What Israeli military leaders really worry about but cannot talk about is losing their nuclear monopoly. An Iranian nuclear weapons capability would not only end that nuclear monopoly but could also prompt other adversaries, like Saudi Arabia and Egypt, to go nuclear as well. The result would be a precarious nuclear balance in which Israel could not respond to provocations with conventional military strikes on Syria and Lebanon, as it can today. If Iran were to reach the threshold of a nuclear weapons state, Tehran would find it much easier to call on its allies in Syria and Hezbollah to strike Israel, knowing that its nuclear weapons would serve as a deterrent to Israel responding against Iran itself.

Back to Syria. It is the strategic relationship between Iran and the regime of Bashar Assad in Syria that makes it possible for Iran to undermine Israel痴 security not through a direct attack, which in the thirty years of hostility between Iran and Israel has never occurred, but through its proxies in Lebanon, like Hezbollah, that are sustained, armed and trained by Iran via Syria.

The end of the Assad regime would end this dangerous alliance. Israel痴 leadership understands well why defeating Assad is now in its interests. Speaking on CNN痴 Amanpour show last week, Defense Minister Ehud Barak argued that 鍍he toppling down of Assad will be a major blow to the radical axis, major blow to Iran. It痴 the only kind of outpost of the Iranian influence in the Arab worldand it will weaken dramatically both Hezbollah in Lebanon and Hamas and Islamic Jihad in Gaza.

Bringing down Assad would not only be a massive boon to Israel痴 security, it would also ease Israel痴 understandable fear of losing its nuclear monopoly. Then, Israel and the United States might be able to develop a common view of when the Iranian program is so dangerous that military action could be warranted.

Right now, it is the combination of Iran痴 strategic alliance with Syria and the steady progress in Iran痴 nuclear enrichment program that has led Israeli leaders to contemplate a surprise attack if necessary over the objections of Washington. With Assad gone, and Iran no longer able to threaten Israel through its, proxies, it is possible that the United States and Israel can agree on red lines for when Iran痴 program has crossed an unacceptable threshold. In short, the White House can ease the tension that has developed with Israel over Iran by doing the right thing in Syria.

The rebellion in Syria has now lasted more than a year. The opposition is not going away, nor is the regime going to accept a diplomatic solution from the outside. With his life and his family at risk, only the threat or use of force will change the Syrian dictator Bashar Assad痴 mind.


2
General discussion / Re: Paddy Jackson apology
« Last post by Milltown Row2 on Today at 07:24:28 AM »
Regime change in Syria鉾ood for Israel; good for the U.S.

Hillary Clinton Email Archive

https://wikileaks.org/clinton-emails/emailid/18328
覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧蘭

UNCLASSIFIED U.S. Department of State Case No. F-2014-20439 Doc No. C05794498 Date: 11/30/2015 RELEASE IN FULL

The best way to help Israel deal with Iran痴 growing nuclear capability is to help the people of Syria overthrow the regime of Bashar Assad.

Negotiations to limit Iran痴 nuclear program will not solve Israel痴 security dilemma. Nor will they stop Iran from improving the crucial part of any nuclear weapons program the capability to enrich uranium. At best, the talks between the world痴 major powers and Iran that began in Istanbul this April and will continue in Baghdad in May will enable Israel to postpone by a few months a decision whether to launch an attack on Iran that could provoke a major Mideast war. Iran痴 nuclear program and Syria痴 civil war may seem unconnected, but they are. For Israeli leaders, the real threat from a nuclear-armed Iran is not the prospect of an insane Iranian leader launching an unprovoked Iranian nuclear attack on Israel that would lead to the annihilation of both countries.

What Israeli military leaders really worry about but cannot talk about is losing their nuclear monopoly. An Iranian nuclear weapons capability would not only end that nuclear monopoly but could also prompt other adversaries, like Saudi Arabia and Egypt, to go nuclear as well. The result would be a precarious nuclear balance in which Israel could not respond to provocations with conventional military strikes on Syria and Lebanon, as it can today. If Iran were to reach the threshold of a nuclear weapons state, Tehran would find it much easier to call on its allies in Syria and Hezbollah to strike Israel, knowing that its nuclear weapons would serve as a deterrent to Israel responding against Iran itself.

Back to Syria. It is the strategic relationship between Iran and the regime of Bashar Assad in Syria that makes it possible for Iran to undermine Israel痴 security not through a direct attack, which in the thirty years of hostility between Iran and Israel has never occurred, but through its proxies in Lebanon, like Hezbollah, that are sustained, armed and trained by Iran via Syria.

The end of the Assad regime would end this dangerous alliance. Israel痴 leadership understands well why defeating Assad is now in its interests. Speaking on CNN痴 Amanpour show last week, Defense Minister Ehud Barak argued that 鍍he toppling down of Assad will be a major blow to the radical axis, major blow to Iran. It痴 the only kind of outpost of the Iranian influence in the Arab worldand it will weaken dramatically both Hezbollah in Lebanon and Hamas and Islamic Jihad in Gaza.

Bringing down Assad would not only be a massive boon to Israel痴 security, it would also ease Israel痴 understandable fear of losing its nuclear monopoly. Then, Israel and the United States might be able to develop a common view of when the Iranian program is so dangerous that military action could be warranted.

Right now, it is the combination of Iran痴 strategic alliance with Syria and the steady progress in Iran痴 nuclear enrichment program that has led Israeli leaders to contemplate a surprise attack if necessary over the objections of Washington. With Assad gone, and Iran no longer able to threaten Israel through its, proxies, it is possible that the United States and Israel can agree on red lines for when Iran痴 program has crossed an unacceptable threshold. In short, the White House can ease the tension that has developed with Israel over Iran by doing the right thing in Syria.

The rebellion in Syria has now lasted more than a year. The opposition is not going away, nor is the regime going to accept a diplomatic solution from the outside. With his life and his family at risk, only the threat or use of force will change the Syrian dictator Bashar Assad痴 mind.

 ::)
3
General discussion / Re: Holidays
« Last post by seafoid on Today at 07:24:10 AM »
We stayed in a lovely campsite with mobile homes etc in the Cote d'Azur near Frejus , about 1hr 15 from Nice. Really good facilities plus a kids club and the region is very interesting. We met a family from Cork who were also staying.

https://www.etoiledargens.com/en
4
General discussion / Re: Holidays
« Last post by omaghjoe on Today at 07:20:39 AM »
Forgot to mention The Irishman in Huntington Beach for home comforts and gibbering Corkish
5
Portlaoise has a good road out of it, at least.
6
General discussion / Re: Holidays
« Last post by gawa316 on Today at 07:07:09 AM »
Any of ye experience of driving from San Fran to LA coastal route. Staying in Monterey half way to break up trip(Heading to us for 3 weeks in May). Giving 2 days for coastal drive. Any bits for LA. Trying to convince herself to go down to San Diego for a day. Stayed by in LA for 4 nights and hear mixed reviews about LA. Staying in Santa Monica in Airbnb. Sound
Make sure you check the coast road is open the whole way or you'll have to double back.  It was closed part way down last year anyway.

Yeah it's still closed, so its going to hard to cram that journey all into 2 days. Loads of stuff to do, even between Santa Cruz and Monterey. Just back from Capitola which is a lovely wee spot on the beach. Take the missus to the Shadowbrook restaurant and ye won't be disappointed. If you are into hiking there is some great spots in the Santa Cruz hills. Big Sur is spectacular and not to be missed. The brother was over last year just after the road closure. We drove down Hwy 1 as far as we could then drove back up and around and headed to Pismo. Lots to do around this area as well, Avilia Beach is a must and then you have Oceano and Arroyo Grande. Heading south Solvang like Joe mentioned is very nice. Little Danish town with wineries and breweries. From there I head to Santa Barbara, just south of there is Carpinteria which is another nice beach town.

What's your plans for LA? We aren't too fussed on it and the traffic would drive ye mental. Definitely try to get down to San Diego...love the place and make sure to go to The Field pub and enjoy a few home comforts!

PM if you have any questions.
7
GAA Discussion / Re: We need to talk about Diarmuid
« Last post by Tubberman on Today at 07:02:23 AM »
Could Connolly Tog for the hurlers yet!?
hes no keith higgins

It would make as much of a joke adding him at this late stage of the season as it would adding a lad just back off the plane from Australia with no senior experience.

You wouldn't get that in Ros!

You literally wouldn't, because the player you're referring to took part in winter training, the FBD and the NFL and still didn't make the championship panel..

Cian Hanley!?
8
General discussion / Re: Holidays
« Last post by omaghjoe on Today at 05:23:33 AM »
Anyone got experience of driving down the West Coast of the USA? It痴 in the frame for the family holiday this Summer probably,  take 12/13 days at it starting in Seattle and finishing in maybe SAN Diego..
yes. did the entire coast a few years back. you could camp all the way if you wanted
the road isn't actually along the coast in a lot of places

Washington - fantastic coast. Olympic national park area is brilliant. You can go inland to Mount Rainier NP too before hitting the coast

Oregon - great big beaches, though with not much along them. Portland is definitely worth a look. My favourite US city.

Northern California - redwoods are pretty cool. the road doesn't actually go along the coast for a lot of it
wine country - the mendocinno wine country is a lot less busy than sonoma or napa

ask away

Any of ye experience of driving from San Fran to LA coastal route. Staying in Monterey half way to break up trip(Heading to us for 3 weeks in May). Giving 2 days for coastal drive. Any bits for LA. Trying to convince herself to go down to San Diego for a day. Stayed by in LA for 4 nights and hear mixed reviews about LA. Staying in Santa Monica in Airbnb. Sound

There was plenty said the last few pages but for that stretch it would be:
Vineyards around Gilroy/Morgan Hill
Big Sur
Missions: Carmel, Santa Barbara probably the pick on that stretch
Hearst Castle kinda pricey
Pismo Beach
Solvang/Los Olivos: more wineries, more picturesque but more crowded
9
General discussion / Re: Nicest Towns in Ireland
« Last post by seafoid on Today at 03:37:07 AM »
Ballycastle, Co. Mayo. Beach, cliffs, archaeology, birdwatching, walking, whalewatching and a wonderful caf at the bottom of the hill.


Not many jobs up there unfortunately though. A friend of mine living in killala has a young son (~10) who plays with Naomh Eoin (or P疆raig)? Anyway, it's an underage amalgamation of 3-4 clubs, doesn't bode well for those clubs in north Mayo

Ah yeah. There are no jobs there. Secondary school closed down 20 yrs ago as well. When you take kids out of a town, you take the soul out of a community. Garda station, I suspect, is gone too. The football clubs are hanging on by the skin of their teeth. Ballycastle had Tom Langan on the Team of the Millennium. Unreal to see his portrait on the wall in their tiny dressing rooms. They also had a player on the 36 AI team. The whole of rural North Mayo is football heartland but with depopulation it is very difficult to keep the show on the road. Amalgamations the only way but that is never without issues as well.
 The area is spectacular though. Anytime I'm ever around Downpatrick Head (I try to visit regularly to do same bird pics.), there are always numbers of people there. One time a lad was running a mobile chipper there.
 As regards tourism, I think there are people locally looking at ways to get people to stay around North Mayo for a few days.

What do you do about that though? You cant force them to stay.

I meant the kids were bussed out and educated elsewhere because the local school was considered inefficient due to falling numbers. Schools in Mayo have been educating kids for migration/emigration forever. It's nice for a rural town to have them about for a while though. Once the school shut the tumbleweed effect kicked in.
Did the school.close after Asahi left?
10
GAA Discussion / Re: We need to talk about Diarmuid
« Last post by Syferus on Today at 03:05:13 AM »
Could Connolly Tog for the hurlers yet!?
hes no keith higgins

It would make as much of a joke adding him at this late stage of the season as it would adding a lad just back off the plane from Australia with no senior experience.

You wouldn't get that in Ros!

You literally wouldn't, because the player you're referring to took part in winter training, the FBD and the NFL and still didn't make the championship panel..
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