Author Topic: Arlene's bigotry shines through  (Read 56139 times)

StGallsGAA

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Arlene's bigotry shines through
« on: February 14, 2018, 01:13:21 PM »
On Tuesday, the DUP leader said there would be:
- no compulsory Irish language in schools (fair enough)
- no-one would be forced to learn Irish (fair enough)
- no quotas for Irish speakers in the civil service (can understand concerns,  so one for further discussion)
- would be no bilingual road signs (why not?)

How on earth could bilingual road signs impact anyone's rights?  Your hatred of Irish language must be such that the very sight of it is unacceptable to you.   This is a demand based on nothing rational, simply blind bigotry.  Keep digging that hole for yourself Arlene. 


armaghniac

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2018, 01:16:35 PM »
With this and Brexit, it is evident that the unionist community has abandoned any sense of sharing the 6 counties. Which is rather strange when they are a declining proportion of its population.
if at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

thewobbler

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2018, 01:25:22 PM »
For what itís worth, bilingual road signs (when the second language is Gaeilge) are more costly to create. There must be tens of thousands of signs across Ireland that declare RampaŪ, which means signs are bigger and need more ink.

More importantly, the increased levels of text involved in bilingualism decreases the legibility of those signs, and therefore decreases their ability to deliver information instantaneously. As such they could be perceived as a distraction to drivers.... and therefore make driving more dangerous.

The opposite might apply in somewhere like Croatia, whereby their influx of tourists undoubtedly struggle with the unusual characters in their lanaguage, and providing an English language version of the message helps prevent tourists from slowing to a stop at junctions and roundabouts.

But in Ireland, where every single person who speaks Irish also speaks English, and tourists have no understanding of Irish, I do believe itís an unnecessary distraction.

RedHand88

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2018, 01:41:00 PM »
Show me studies which prove accidents are more common in the south than the north because the south have bilingual road signs. Otherwise, away with that rubbish.

tonto1888

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2018, 01:41:09 PM »
For what itís worth, bilingual road signs (when the second language is Gaeilge) are more costly to create. There must be tens of thousands of signs across Ireland that declare RampaŪ, which means signs are bigger and need more ink.

More importantly, the increased levels of text involved in bilingualism decreases the legibility of those signs, and therefore decreases their ability to deliver information instantaneously. As such they could be perceived as a distraction to drivers.... and therefore make driving more dangerous.

The opposite might apply in somewhere like Croatia, whereby their influx of tourists undoubtedly struggle with the unusual characters in their lanaguage, and providing an English language version of the message helps prevent tourists from slowing to a stop at junctions and roundabouts.

But in Ireland, where every single person who speaks Irish also speaks English, and tourists have no understanding of Irish, I do believe itís an unnecessary distraction.

all fair points but are these the road sign related reasons the DUP are adamant there will be no act?

seafoid

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2018, 01:44:42 PM »
For what itís worth, bilingual road signs (when the second language is Gaeilge) are more costly to create. There must be tens of thousands of signs across Ireland that declare RampaŪ, which means signs are bigger and need more ink.

More importantly, the increased levels of text involved in bilingualism decreases the legibility of those signs, and therefore decreases their ability to deliver information instantaneously. As such they could be perceived as a distraction to drivers.... and therefore make driving more dangerous.

The opposite might apply in somewhere like Croatia, whereby their influx of tourists undoubtedly struggle with the unusual characters in their lanaguage, and providing an English language version of the message helps prevent tourists from slowing to a stop at junctions and roundabouts.

But in Ireland, where every single person who speaks Irish also speaks English, and tourists have no understanding of Irish, I do believe itís an unnecessary distraction.
The cost to the economy is minimal. DiffereNT languages have different fonts. English is in capitals. There are no coherent arguments against bilingual road signs imo.

Unionists do not want any visible sign of Irishness in their little corner of England Mar dhea.
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armaghniac

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2018, 01:46:02 PM »
There are place-name signs and warning signs. Place-names are Irish in origin and should on signs. Warning signs should have as little text as possible but be symbolic, so they might well not change.
if at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

AQMP

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2018, 01:49:51 PM »
For what itís worth, bilingual road signs (when the second language is Gaeilge) are more costly to create. There must be tens of thousands of signs across Ireland that declare RampaŪ, which means signs are bigger and need more ink.

More importantly, the increased levels of text involved in bilingualism decreases the legibility of those signs, and therefore decreases their ability to deliver information instantaneously. As such they could be perceived as a distraction to drivers.... and therefore make driving more dangerous.

The opposite might apply in somewhere like Croatia, whereby their influx of tourists undoubtedly struggle with the unusual characters in their lanaguage, and providing an English language version of the message helps prevent tourists from slowing to a stop at junctions and roundabouts.

But in Ireland, where every single person who speaks Irish also speaks English, and tourists have no understanding of Irish, I do believe itís an unnecessary distraction.

Complete and utter shite

Avondhu star

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2018, 01:52:04 PM »
For what itís worth, bilingual road signs (when the second language is Gaeilge) are more costly to create. There must be tens of thousands of signs across Ireland that declare RampaŪ, which means signs are bigger and need more ink.

More importantly, the increased levels of text involved in bilingualism decreases the legibility of those signs, and therefore decreases their ability to deliver information instantaneously. As such they could be perceived as a distraction to drivers.... and therefore make driving more dangerous.

The opposite might apply in somewhere like Croatia, whereby their influx of tourists undoubtedly struggle with the unusual characters in their lanaguage, and providing an English language version of the message helps prevent tourists from slowing to a stop at junctions and roundabouts.

But in Ireland, where every single person who speaks Irish also speaks English, and tourists have no understanding of Irish, I do believe itís an unnecessary distraction.
The cost to the economy is minimal. DiffereNT languages have different fonts. English is in capitals. There are no coherent arguments against bilingual road signs imo.

Unionists do not want any visible sign of Irishness in their little corner of England Mar dhea.

Nationalists dont want the Orange Order with their symbols of British culture marching through Nationalists areas but you think the Unionists should have symbols of Irish culture in Unionist areas.
Lee Harvey Oswald , your country needs you

Dire Ear

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2018, 01:52:47 PM »
Unionism generally have no leaders , leading by example so that all have equal rights
No give way with the majority of them,  and no forward thinking

StGallsGAA

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2018, 01:53:12 PM »
For what itís worth, bilingual road signs (when the second language is Gaeilge) are more costly to create. There must be tens of thousands of signs across Ireland that declare RampaŪ, which means signs are bigger and need more ink.

More importantly, the increased levels of text involved in bilingualism decreases the legibility of those signs, and therefore decreases their ability to deliver information instantaneously. As such they could be perceived as a distraction to drivers.... and therefore make driving more dangerous.

The opposite might apply in somewhere like Croatia, whereby their influx of tourists undoubtedly struggle with the unusual characters in their lanaguage, and providing an English language version of the message helps prevent tourists from slowing to a stop at junctions and roundabouts.

But in Ireland, where every single person who speaks Irish also speaks English, and tourists have no understanding of Irish, I do believe itís an unnecessary distraction.
Where has Arlene suggested their opposition is due to cost?

Avondhu star

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2018, 01:57:17 PM »
There are Irish language enthusiasts in Connemara and West Kerry who oppose having road signs in English. They are prepared to take English speakers Euros though
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armaghniac

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2018, 02:04:33 PM »
There are Irish language enthusiasts in Connemara and West Kerry who oppose having road signs in English. They are prepared to take English speakers Euros though

There are people in Italy, Spain, Germany, Denmark etc who have roadsigns in their language and who also welcome tourists from English speaking regions.
if at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

trueblue1234

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2018, 02:08:45 PM »
For what itís worth, bilingual road signs (when the second language is Gaeilge) are more costly to create. There must be tens of thousands of signs across Ireland that declare RampaŪ, which means signs are bigger and need more ink.

More importantly, the increased levels of text involved in bilingualism decreases the legibility of those signs, and therefore decreases their ability to deliver information instantaneously. As such they could be perceived as a distraction to drivers.... and therefore make driving more dangerous.

The opposite might apply in somewhere like Croatia, whereby their influx of tourists undoubtedly struggle with the unusual characters in their lanaguage, and providing an English language version of the message helps prevent tourists from slowing to a stop at junctions and roundabouts.

But in Ireland, where every single person who speaks Irish also speaks English, and tourists have no understanding of Irish, I do believe itís an unnecessary distraction.
The cost to the economy is minimal. DiffereNT languages have different fonts. English is in capitals. There are no coherent arguments against bilingual road signs imo.

Unionists do not want any visible sign of Irishness in their little corner of England Mar dhea.

Nationalists dont want the Orange Order with their symbols of British culture marching through Nationalists areas but you think the Unionists should have symbols of Irish culture in Unionist areas.

Are you seriously comparing the OO with the Irish language? That's the sort of sh!te that goes on. One is a language. The other is a sectarian organisation. But you see them as equal. Jesus wept.   
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seafoid

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Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2018, 02:09:25 PM »
Under an Irish language act Orange Halls would be forced to offer confession.Protestant bars would be put out of business if they refused to sell holy water.
Those biscuits are for the visitors