Author Topic: Teachers get it handy!  (Read 98522 times)

Tony Baloney

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1380 on: January 31, 2017, 01:35:41 PM »
If the ETI are prevented from performing a proper assessment of the school they should assume the worst possible case and publicly issue the school with the lowest possible inspection outcome.

Milltown Row2

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1381 on: January 31, 2017, 02:58:23 PM »
If the ETI are prevented from performing a proper assessment of the school they should assume the worst possible case and publicly issue the school with the lowest possible inspection outcome.

Well the only thing they aint seeing is a lesson, they are interested in results stats student progression, they'll carry out student interviews also, its only one area of a dozen other things... they can only mark them down on that surely?
Anything I post is not the view of the County Board!! Nobody died in the making of this post ;-)

Take Your Points

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1382 on: January 31, 2017, 04:20:31 PM »
TYP, do you work for ETI?

No.  My days at the chalkface have ended and I am able to sit back and enjoy the goings on from a distance.

Take Your Points

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1383 on: January 31, 2017, 04:35:24 PM »
If the ETI are prevented from performing a proper assessment of the school they should assume the worst possible case and publicly issue the school with the lowest possible inspection outcome.

Well the only thing they aint seeing is a lesson, they are interested in results stats student progression, they'll carry out student interviews also, its only one area of a dozen other things... they can only mark them down on that surely?

ETI will spend even more time going through the paperwork in primary schools and will be able to garner enough information to issue a report with the caveat that they could not observe all of the teaching required.  However, as in previous action, they will return to each school to do their observations and take a second shot.  No one escapes.

In secondary schools there is a mountain of data that can be extracted from C2K system and it is then compared to the benchmarks.  From this data ETI will draw a range of conclusions and then return to the school to complete the process through observation.

Before any inspection, the reporting inspector will have gathered information from a range of sources including questionnaires from staff and parents that allow the slant of the inspection to be decided.  The inspection team will be given target areas to go for and on the basis of their findings from interviewing teachers, post-holders, ancillary staff, parents and pupils they will draw their conclusions. All of this is usually carried out quickly by the team leader before the classroom observations begin. Classroom observations give a feel for the overall situation and are there to provide on the spot data that inspectors use during the inspection.  Inspectors report back to the headteacher if they find issues with the quality of the teaching, they never mention the name of the teacher and never give anything in writing just an oral report which is not worth the paper it is written on.  They will ask the headteacher to see if they know about the problem and then ask what has been done to sort it out prior to the inspection.  Teachers are never named in the final report and even to management and governors regardless of how poor their teaching is.  So, observation of classes is a jumping off point for inspectors to tackle management at all levels. Only one person is ever named in the report, i.e. the headteacher.  When the inspectors return for a follow up they go directly to the areas of concern with the teaching to see what has been done by management who have had their hands tied by not having a written assessment of any teacher from the inspectors.  Doesn't happen in any other area with proper appraisal built in but is ok for education.

Any ETI team leaving a school inspection disrupted by industrial action will quietly smile and think tiocfaidh ar la and unlike a normal inspection will have plenty of time to consider the data gathered before coming back to judge the teaching standards and complete a final report.  Industrial action against ETI is nonsense for teachers and schools as it will come back to bite them in the long run.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2017, 04:42:34 PM by Take Your Points »

Milltown Row2

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1384 on: January 31, 2017, 04:47:32 PM »
totally agree, id be all for getting it done dusted and moved on, take on board the report and implement findings
Anything I post is not the view of the County Board!! Nobody died in the making of this post ;-)

JimStynes

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1385 on: January 31, 2017, 09:20:03 PM »
I've had two inspections in two different schools in the past three years. I've found them to be a complete load of balls. Both inspections have went well in terms of results and how my own personal lessons went. But I found it laughable at times. Some of the inspectors demands and also how both schools put on a 'marvellous' and unrealistic show for the ETI. All singing and all dancing!

Both inspections had ex secondary school teachers and principals and only one primary school trained teacher. I remember the foundation stage teachers sitting in the staff room laughing about some of the things the inspector was suggesting to them. No offence to secondary school teachers, but they wouldn't be the best people to observe a teacher teaching 5/6 year old children during a phonics lesson or free play lesson. I found a lot of them to be completely out of touch with the day to day running of a school/classroom. And yes they're not allowed to say if someone had a bad lesson, but it was very easy to work it out and they basically spelled it out to some senior management. Thankfully we didn't have any disastrous lessons.

We were complimented in the report for something. The truth was it was something that the school threw together once they heard they were getting inspected. The whole experience was very fake. They compiled a report from our data but didn't seem to take into consideration the demographics and home lives of some of our children. A lot of our children come from the most horrible backgrounds and are lucky to be coming into school at all, never mind meeting their expected PIE and PIM scores.

The box ticking and paper work involved in teaching now is ridiculous and it is being led from ETI and scaring principals into forcing it onto their staff. A lot of it seems to be coming from England. Not the best example to be following in my opinion. I have a lot of friends who are teachers in England. They're regularly landing into school at 7am and not leaving until 6.00/6.30 at night and then work to do at nights. f**k that. No wonder they're leaving the profession over there. I wouldn't mind as much if all the paper work was actually helping children but very little of it makes one bit of difference to their learning.  It just leads to increased workload and staff morale getting worse. I am all for monitoring and evaluation of teachers and schools but it can surely be done in a better and less stressful way.

DownFanatic

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1386 on: January 31, 2017, 10:53:43 PM »
I've had two inspections in two different schools in the past three years. I've found them to be a complete load of balls. Both inspections have went well in terms of results and how my own personal lessons went. But I found it laughable at times. Some of the inspectors demands and also how both schools put on a 'marvellous' and unrealistic show for the ETI. All singing and all dancing!

Both inspections had ex secondary school teachers and principals and only one primary school trained teacher. I remember the foundation stage teachers sitting in the staff room laughing about some of the things the inspector was suggesting to them. No offence to secondary school teachers, but they wouldn't be the best people to observe a teacher teaching 5/6 year old children during a phonics lesson or free play lesson. I found a lot of them to be completely out of touch with the day to day running of a school/classroom. And yes they're not allowed to say if someone had a bad lesson, but it was very easy to work it out and they basically spelled it out to some senior management. Thankfully we didn't have any disastrous lessons.

We were complimented in the report for something. The truth was it was something that the school threw together once they heard they were getting inspected. The whole experience was very fake. They compiled a report from our data but didn't seem to take into consideration the demographics and home lives of some of our children. A lot of our children come from the most horrible backgrounds and are lucky to be coming into school at all, never mind meeting their expected PIE and PIM scores.

The box ticking and paper work involved in teaching now is ridiculous and it is being led from ETI and scaring principals into forcing it onto their staff. A lot of it seems to be coming from England. Not the best example to be following in my opinion. I have a lot of friends who are teachers in England. They're regularly landing into school at 7am and not leaving until 6.00/6.30 at night and then work to do at nights. f**k that. No wonder they're leaving the profession over there. I wouldn't mind as much if all the paper work was actually helping children but very little of it makes one bit of difference to their learning.  It just leads to increased workload and staff morale getting worse. I am all for monitoring and evaluation of teachers and schools but it can surely be done in a better and less stressful way.

Agree with every sentiment.

Take Your Points

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1387 on: March 08, 2017, 10:23:39 PM »
Major blow to 240 teachers!

A scheme to allow 120 teachers over 55 to retire without any reduction of their pensions and to employ 120 teachers in their place has been suspended after the 120 retiring teachers had been informed that they could leave.  Not sure if any teachers had already left or new teachers employed.

A key element of the scheme was that the new teacher had to be qualified no earlier than 2012 in order to ensure that a cost saving could be realised to pay towards the cost of the scheme.  The cost would be huge as normally pensions are actuarially reduced by 5% per year for each year a teacher retires before 60, potentially reducing the teachers pension by 25% to take account of them not contributing until they were 60 and then drawing their pension for an additional 5 years before retirement age.

It appears that a teacher who was excluded from being employed in the scheme because they were qualified before 2012 has sought a judicial review of the scheme criteria for employment.  The DE civil servants have decided in the absence of a minister to halt the whole scheme while this legal situation is resolved.  No hope of a minister in place in the foreseeable future to make a decision on the scheme.

Also 120 teachers were counting on permanent jobs, young ones hoping to get mortgages and move on.  A disaster for them as the budgets in schools are about to crash down and major job losses just around the corner.  So, no hope of permanent employment.

Imagine having been given the OK to take early retirement on the full amount of the pension you had accrued (no actuarial reduction), planning for getting out the door and now being told that it was cancelled.  Oh dear, 120 teachers already mentally left the building are not going to be happy.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-39208077
« Last Edit: March 08, 2017, 10:25:37 PM by Take Your Points »

DickyRock

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1388 on: March 08, 2017, 11:29:34 PM »
Always thought the scheme was discriminatory. Not surprised that someone took a case

theskull1

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1389 on: March 08, 2017, 11:44:01 PM »
I'd say it would be only the 120 complete wastes of spaces that they would want to retire.
Rubbish teachers are letting there pupils down and leaving the dedicated teachers to carry the extra burden leaving them completely overworked. What incentive is there to be a diligent 55 year old teacher?

thebigfella

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1390 on: March 09, 2017, 12:26:06 AM »
Major blow to 240 teachers!

A scheme to allow 120 teachers over 55 to retire without any reduction of their pensions and to employ 120 teachers in their place has been suspended after the 120 retiring teachers had been informed that they could leave.  Not sure if any teachers had already left or new teachers employed.

A key element of the scheme was that the new teacher had to be qualified no earlier than 2012 in order to ensure that a cost saving could be realised to pay towards the cost of the scheme.  The cost would be huge as normally pensions are actuarially reduced by 5% per year for each year a teacher retires before 60, potentially reducing the teachers pension by 25% to take account of them not contributing until they were 60 and then drawing their pension for an additional 5 years before retirement age.

It appears that a teacher who was excluded from being employed in the scheme because they were qualified before 2012 has sought a judicial review of the scheme criteria for employment.  The DE civil servants have decided in the absence of a minister to halt the whole scheme while this legal situation is resolved.  No hope of a minister in place in the foreseeable future to make a decision on the scheme.

Also 120 teachers were counting on permanent jobs, young ones hoping to get mortgages and move on.  A disaster for them as the budgets in schools are about to crash down and major job losses just around the corner.  So, no hope of permanent employment.

Imagine having been given the OK to take early retirement on the full amount of the pension you had accrued (no actuarial reduction), planning for getting out the door and now being told that it was cancelled.  Oh dear, 120 teachers already mentally left the building are not going to be happy.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-39208077

This sickens my hole.

JimStynes

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1391 on: March 09, 2017, 10:45:18 AM »
In what way? I was earning more than my wife but couldn't get a mortgage because I didn't have a permanent job at the time.

Take Your Points

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1392 on: March 09, 2017, 10:58:53 AM »
In what way? I was earning more than my wife but couldn't get a mortgage because I didn't have a permanent job at the time.

There are many like you across the country due to temporary employment being used as a strategy by employers in a range of situations.

manfromdelmonte

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1393 on: April 07, 2017, 07:53:40 AM »
12:00 today, out the gap...

highorlow

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Re: Teachers get it handy!
« Reply #1394 on: April 07, 2017, 09:27:04 AM »
Quote
12:00 today, out the gap...

For 2 weeks...