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GAA Discussion => GAA Discussion => Topic started by: BennyCake on September 09, 2014, 12:47:26 PM

Title: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: BennyCake on September 09, 2014, 12:47:26 PM
I don't think we have a thread where rules can be discussed and clarified, so here's one now.

I have a couple of rules myself I need clearing up...

- What's the situation regarding extra time? As far as I'm aware, a team down to 13 or 14 players, will have a full team for extra time. Are the players added to the 15 for ET, counted as part of their sub allocation?

Also, teams that have used their allocation of subs in normal time, how many extra subs do they get in ET?

- is a player allowed to fist the ball to himself? I noticed it happened in the Kerry Mayo replay. I didn't think this was allowed.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Hardy on September 09, 2014, 12:52:31 PM
Good idea for a dedicated thread.

We should start with a read of this:

http://www.gaa.ie/content/documents/publications/official_guides/Official_Guide_2012_Part2.pdf (http://www.gaa.ie/content/documents/publications/official_guides/Official_Guide_2012_Part2.pdf)
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: 5 Sams on September 09, 2014, 12:52:58 PM
Dunno about the ET and subs but there's no problem with a player fisting the ball to himself as long as it touches the ground before he regains possession. Thats what happened in the Kerry Mayo game when I think it was Crowley punched the ball ahead of himself and picked it up again after it bounced.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Hardy on September 09, 2014, 02:05:21 PM

- What's the situation regarding extra time? As far as I'm aware, a team down to 13 or 14 players, will have a full team for extra time. Are the players added to the 15 for ET, counted as part of their sub allocation?

Also, teams that have used their allocation of subs in normal time, how many extra subs do they get in ET?

2.6 Players in Extra Time
(a) Any fifteen players may start Extra Time,
except as provided for in (b) and (d) below.

(b) In an Inter-County Game, any fifteen players on
the List submitted to the Referee prior to the
game, except as provided for in (d) below, may
start Extra Time.

(c) The Referee shall be given a List of the 15
players starting Extra Time, or a Note clearly
indicating the changes made from that of
the finishing team in Normal Time. This List/
Note may be in single form but shall otherwise
comply with the provisions of Rule 2.5 - List of
Players.

(d) A player ordered off in any circumstance in
Normal Time, may not play in Extra Time but
may be replaced.

(e) Substitutions/Temporary Substitutions shall
be allowed during the playing of Extra Time as
outlined in Rule 2.4(ii) and (iii).

(f) A Caution (Yellow Card) issued in Normal Time
shall carry over into Extra Time.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: blewuporstuffed on September 09, 2014, 02:22:07 PM
Whats the rule for kickouts now that they are all taken from the 13? where do the outfeild players need to be? outside the 21 or outside the D or what? Every referee seems to inforce something different
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: westbound on September 09, 2014, 02:36:30 PM
Outside the 21 (and 13metres from the ball). But the ball must travel a distance of 13metres before it can be gathered by another player (on the defending team).

Where lots of people get confused is when the ball goes diagonally towards the sideline and travels more than 13metres, a player IS allowed to come inside the 21 to collect the ball provided he was outside the 21 when it was kicked.

I think i remember reading on here before that technically, by the letter of the law the goalkeeper could kick the ball to himself (and in theory dribble the length of the field) as long as he didn't pick it up!

Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Milltown Row2 on September 09, 2014, 03:00:25 PM
Outside the 21 (and 13metres from the ball). But the ball must travel a distance of 13metres before it can be gathered by another player (on the defending team).

Where lots of people get confused is when the ball goes diagonally towards the sideline and travels more than 13metres, a player IS allowed to come inside the 21 to collect the ball provided he was outside the 21 when it was kicked.

I think i remember reading on here before that technically, by the letter of the law the goalkeeper could kick the ball to himself (and in theory dribble the length of the field) as long as he didn't pick it up!

Correct
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: blewuporstuffed on September 09, 2014, 04:07:57 PM
Outside the 21 (and 13metres from the ball). But the ball must travel a distance of 13metres before it can be gathered by another player (on the defending team).

Where lots of people get confused is when the ball goes diagonally towards the sideline and travels more than 13metres, a player IS allowed to come inside the 21 to collect the ball provided he was outside the 21 when it was kicked.

I think i remember reading on here before that technically, by the letter of the law the goalkeeper could kick the ball to himself (and in theory dribble the length of the field) as long as he didn't pick it up!

Correct
Its just that ive seen players standing on the 21 directly in front of the keeper with their arms in the air and referees letting that go (even though they would only be 8m from the ball) whereas some referees insist on all players being outside the 'D' as well.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: screenexile on September 09, 2014, 04:22:00 PM
Outside the 21 (and 13metres from the ball). But the ball must travel a distance of 13metres before it can be gathered by another player (on the defending team).

Where lots of people get confused is when the ball goes diagonally towards the sideline and travels more than 13metres, a player IS allowed to come inside the 21 to collect the ball provided he was outside the 21 when it was kicked.

I think i remember reading on here before that technically, by the letter of the law the goalkeeper could kick the ball to himself (and in theory dribble the length of the field) as long as he didn't pick it up!

Correct
Its just that ive seen players standing on the 21 directly in front of the keeper with their arms in the air and referees letting that go (even though they would only be 8m from the ball) whereas some referees insist on all players being outside the 'D' as well.

Good point! Why is the D there in the first place? Was it brought in as an exclusion zone for when keepers used to kick the ball from the 21?

Anyway if it's there we may as well use it and have lads stand outside it for kickouts!!!
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: AZOffaly on September 09, 2014, 04:22:45 PM
Penalties in Hurling and Football,  and Kickouts I thought.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: westbound on September 09, 2014, 04:32:10 PM
Penalties in Hurling and Football,  and Kickouts I thought.

Correct, exclusion zone was brought in for penalties (and kickouts when they were on the 21).

In response to blewuporstuffed, I guess some referees use some discretion and don't bother holding the game up to move players back a few yards if they aren't going to interfere with the keeper's kickout. If they blocked the ball down I presume the attacker would be penalised.
I'm not saying thats correct as per the rule book, but I'd say that what some refs do.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: johnneycool on September 09, 2014, 04:37:31 PM
Outside the 21 (and 13metres from the ball). But the ball must travel a distance of 13metres before it can be gathered by another player (on the defending team).

Where lots of people get confused is when the ball goes diagonally towards the sideline and travels more than 13metres, a player IS allowed to come inside the 21 to collect the ball provided he was outside the 21 when it was kicked.

I think i remember reading on here before that technically, by the letter of the law the goalkeeper could kick the ball to himself (and in theory dribble the length of the field) as long as he didn't pick it up!

Correct
Its just that ive seen players standing on the 21 directly in front of the keeper with their arms in the air and referees letting that go (even though they would only be 8m from the ball) whereas some referees insist on all players being outside the 'D' as well.

I know its slightly different, but I was once told by an intercouty referee (hurling) when I questioned him on why he gave a free against one of our lads for blocking a sideline cut was that he wasn't the required distance away from the ball. I pointed out he was standing directly beside his marker and he responded that if he'd have blocked it instead it would have been our free...
Not sure if he was using poetic license or not..
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: bailestil on September 09, 2014, 04:44:24 PM
Rule 1.2 Exception II
Any Player who falls or is knocked to the ground while in possession of the ball may fist or palm the ball away on the ground and may score by doing so.

I can safely say I've seen this hundreds of times, and blown up every single time.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: rrhf on September 10, 2014, 06:58:47 AM
The paddy Russell rule.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: westbound on September 10, 2014, 08:49:50 AM
Rule 1.2 Exception II
Any Player who falls or is knocked to the ground while in possession of the ball may fist or palm the ball away on the ground and may score by doing so.

I can safely say I've seen this hundreds of times, and blown up every single time.

In fairness, I've seen a few refs allow this (Correctly) - but the abuse they've gotten from the players/mentors & supporters who obviously didn't know this rule has been ridiculous!
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Harold Disgracey on September 10, 2014, 12:42:03 PM
Has a referee ever ordered a penalty to be retaken for a goalkeeper advancing off his line?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: blanketattack on September 10, 2014, 02:48:15 PM
If a player attempts a fist pass to his goalie but it goes over his head straight into the net, is it a 45 or a goal?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: larryin89 on September 10, 2014, 02:57:24 PM
Slightly off topic but still in line with the theme.

Cormac Reiley had an absolute stinker in semi final replay in a lot of peoples opinion. The usually outspoken godfather of  officialdom mr Pat ' i robbed mayo in 96' McNeaney has not commented on the performance . Is there a reason for this , is he obliged to comment on such a controversial performance ?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Milltown Row2 on September 10, 2014, 04:49:00 PM
Outside the 21 (and 13metres from the ball). But the ball must travel a distance of 13metres before it can be gathered by another player (on the defending team).

Where lots of people get confused is when the ball goes diagonally towards the sideline and travels more than 13metres, a player IS allowed to come inside the 21 to collect the ball provided he was outside the 21 when it was kicked.

I think i remember reading on here before that technically, by the letter of the law the goalkeeper could kick the ball to himself (and in theory dribble the length of the field) as long as he didn't pick it up!

Correct
Its just that ive seen players standing on the 21 directly in front of the keeper with their arms in the air and referees letting that go (even though they would only be 8m from the ball) whereas some referees insist on all players being outside the 'D' as well.

I know its slightly different, but I was once told by an intercouty referee (hurling) when I questioned him on why he gave a free against one of our lads for blocking a sideline cut was that he wasn't the required distance away from the ball. I pointed out he was standing directly beside his marker and he responded that if he'd have blocked it instead it would have been our free...
Not sure if he was using poetic license or not..

Both players need to be back the required distance,  the player who's not back the proper distance and 'fouls' the ball will be penalised against. Has been in a while in fairness, it used to be a hop ball back in the day? Anyways I make sure the feckers are right back and warn them accordingly. The amount of times I've heard he's too close ref!!! Feck off stop annoying me lol
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Rossfan on September 10, 2014, 05:41:09 PM
If a player attempts a fist pass to his goalie but it goes over his head straight into the net, is it a 45 or a goal?

3.4 If a defending player plays the ball through his
own scoring space in any manner, this shall
count as a score.

Hope you're not a Ref blanket  :o
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: From the Bunker on September 10, 2014, 11:11:54 PM
Slightly off topic but still in line with the theme.

Cormac Reiley had an absolute stinker in semi final replay in a lot of peoples opinion. The usually outspoken godfather of  officialdom mr Pat ' i robbed mayo in 96' McNeaney has not commented on the performance . Is there a reason for this , is he obliged to comment on such a controversial performance ?

Silence is golden. It's all about getting past the week after. Dublin losing to Donegal helped defer attention. The pitch intruder also deferred attention. Pat will keep his gob shut. Sure he can't say he had a stinker? Can he? The dogs on the street know we were shafted! Reilly had his agenda (what ever it was) and he seen it through. Kerry seen an opening and they like any grateful receiver said thank you very much. We'd have done the same given half a chance. Churning out the same lines about the Ref being grand, we had more hunger and We played better!
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: blanketattack on September 11, 2014, 01:31:55 AM
If a player attempts a fist pass to his goalie but it goes over his head straight into the net, is it a 45 or a goal?

3.4 If a defending player plays the ball through his
own scoring space in any manner, this shall
count as a score.

Hope you're not a Ref blanket  :o

No, for some reason I thought it was like a throw-in in soccer where if it goes into your own net it's a corner.


Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: blewuporstuffed on September 11, 2014, 08:40:15 AM
Can anyone clarify the advantage rule?
Last week we had a very dubious application of the advantage rule (and it benefited us)
A long ball was played into one of our forwards, who was quite clearly being fouled, but the ball broke to our corner forward who was through one on one with the keeper, the ref quite rightly put his arm in the air for an advantage, our player took a shot at goal and the keeper got down and made a great save.The referee then brought play back for the original foul.
Surely this isnt the way the advantage rule was intended to be applied  ???
I would have thought as soon as the ball fell to our other forward in an advantageous position, that was the end of the advantage, regardless of whether he scored or not?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: westbound on September 11, 2014, 09:54:05 AM
Advantage Rule:
When a foul is committed the referee may allow the play to continue if he considers it to be to the advantage of the offended team. He shall signal that advantage by raising an arm upright. If he deems no advantage to have occurred, he may subsequently award a free for that foul from where it occurred*. The referee shall allow the advantage to run by maintaining his arm in the upright position for up to five seconds after the initial foul or for less time if it becomes clear that no advantage has accrued. He shall apply any relevant disciplinary action.”

It's at the referee's discretion as to what he considers an advantage to be.

For me, if a foul is committed which is in a scoreable position then if the attacking team doesn't score within the 5 seconds (regardless of whether they have had a shot at goal or not) then the play should be called back for the free.
IMO, a scoreable free is more advantageous than a shot being saved by the goalkeeper. So therefore I would say the referee was correct in the example given by blewuporstuffed.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Hardy on September 11, 2014, 10:24:43 AM
It's interesting that the wording is such that the referee may end the advantage period inside the five seconds if an advantage has not occurred, but may not end it within the five seconds if an advantage has occurred.

So the referee must wait for five seconds to deem that an advantage has accrued but can deem that an advantage has not accrued in, say, 2 seconds.

That seems to mean that he can't consider it an advantage if, for instance, the team of the fouled player gets possession from the foul and end the advantage period. He must wait five seconds. In theory, the attacking team could have two shots back off the post and a great save from the keeper in that time and still get a free. 

It also means that if there's a subsequent foul within the five seconds, he can't start a new advantage, but must stop  for the original foul.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: haranguerer on September 11, 2014, 10:32:49 AM
There would need to be certainty of consistency between refs, but it had occurred to me that in an attackng position where a ref has signalled advantage, you should shoot for goal, no matter the angle, distance, etc, as the point would be secure from the free if you miss anyway. Refs dont like anyone being too smart though, so no doubt you'd lose your free no matter the precedents.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Down Follower on September 11, 2014, 11:01:36 AM
There would need to be certainty of consistency between refs, but it had occurred to me that in an attackng position where a ref has signalled advantage, you should shoot for goal, no matter the angle, distance, etc, as the point would be secure from the free if you miss anyway. Refs dont like anyone being too smart though, so no doubt you'd lose your free no matter the precedents.

I laughed at that one and can imagine a cocky wee corner forward with the coloured boots on trying a ridiculous shot over his shoulder with the weak foot thinking in his head - well I am guaranteed a free anyway!! Ref thinks knows rightly what he is at and plays on coz he was being too smart  ;)
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: westbound on September 11, 2014, 11:06:12 AM
It's interesting that the wording is such that the referee may end the advantage period inside the five seconds if an advantage has not occurred, but may not end it within the five seconds if an advantage has occurred.

So the referee must wait for five seconds to deem that an advantage has accrued but can deem that an advantage has not accrued in, say, 2 seconds.

That seems to mean that he can't consider it an advantage if, for instance, the team of the fouled player gets possession from the foul and end the advantage period. He must wait five seconds. In theory, the attacking team could have two shots back off the post and a great save from the keeper in that time and still get a free. 

It also means that if there's a subsequent foul within the five seconds, he can't start a new advantage, but must stop  for the original foul.

Hardy, I would agree with all you have said except the very last part. If there is a subsequent foul in a better position the ref shouldn't stop play for the original foul.  A free from the position of the latter foul is the advantage accrued.

I would also argue that the ref could give a new advantage and start another 5 seconds but we might need Pat McEnaney to clarify for us!!!  ;)
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: johnneycool on September 11, 2014, 11:13:34 AM
There would need to be certainty of consistency between refs, but it had occurred to me that in an attackng position where a ref has signalled advantage, you should shoot for goal, no matter the angle, distance, etc, as the point would be secure from the free if you miss anyway. Refs dont like anyone being too smart though, so no doubt you'd lose your free no matter the precedents.

In all likelihood the ref is going to be behind you, so seeing an advantage signal could be difficult unless the refs now shout out that they're playing an advantage ala the rugby lads.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: passedit on September 11, 2014, 11:23:28 AM
Not sure the ref I saw on friday night is totally au fait with the advantage rule.

Defender pursuing attacker when a second attacker body checked the defender leaving the first attacker with a clear run on goal which he took full advantage of. Referee awarded the goal then jogged back up the pitch and black carded the body checker. Still trying to get my head round that one.

Also in a recent game same team awarded two fourteen yard frees for a push and a drag back in the large square. The referee's logic for these was that neither foul was 'Aggressive'.  :o
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Hardy on September 11, 2014, 11:33:06 AM
It's interesting that the wording is such that the referee may end the advantage period inside the five seconds if an advantage has not occurred, but may not end it within the five seconds if an advantage has occurred.

So the referee must wait for five seconds to deem that an advantage has accrued but can deem that an advantage has not accrued in, say, 2 seconds.

That seems to mean that he can't consider it an advantage if, for instance, the team of the fouled player gets possession from the foul and end the advantage period. He must wait five seconds. In theory, the attacking team could have two shots back off the post and a great save from the keeper in that time and still get a free. 

It also means that if there's a subsequent foul within the five seconds, he can't start a new advantage, but must stop  for the original foul.

Hardy, I would agree with all you have said except the very last part. If there is a subsequent foul in a better position the ref shouldn't stop play for the original foul.  A free from the position of the latter foul is the advantage accrued.

That makes sense.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: blewuporstuffed on September 11, 2014, 11:56:46 AM
Advantage Rule:
When a foul is committed the referee may allow the play to continue if he considers it to be to the advantage of the offended team. He shall signal that advantage by raising an arm upright. If he deems no advantage to have occurred, he may subsequently award a free for that foul from where it occurred*. The referee shall allow the advantage to run by maintaining his arm in the upright position for up to five seconds after the initial foul or for less time if it becomes clear that no advantage has accrued. He shall apply any relevant disciplinary action.”

It's at the referee's discretion as to what he considers an advantage to be.

For me, if a foul is committed which is in a scoreable position then if the attacking team doesn't score within the 5 seconds (regardless of whether they have had a shot at goal or not) then the play should be called back for the free.
IMO, a scoreable free is more advantageous than a shot being saved by the goalkeeper. So therefore I would say the referee was correct in the example given by blewuporstuffed.
Yes but is an attacker being through one on one with the keeper not more advantageous than a free kick?Therefore the advantage has occurred?if he then chooses to take his point or go for goal (no matter what the out come) then that is up to the attacker.
As I said, we came out the right side of this one, but it just didnt seem right to me.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: westbound on September 11, 2014, 12:20:31 PM
Advantage Rule:
When a foul is committed the referee may allow the play to continue if he considers it to be to the advantage of the offended team. He shall signal that advantage by raising an arm upright. If he deems no advantage to have occurred, he may subsequently award a free for that foul from where it occurred*. The referee shall allow the advantage to run by maintaining his arm in the upright position for up to five seconds after the initial foul or for less time if it becomes clear that no advantage has accrued. He shall apply any relevant disciplinary action.”

It's at the referee's discretion as to what he considers an advantage to be.

For me, if a foul is committed which is in a scoreable position then if the attacking team doesn't score within the 5 seconds (regardless of whether they have had a shot at goal or not) then the play should be called back for the free.
IMO, a scoreable free is more advantageous than a shot being saved by the goalkeeper. So therefore I would say the referee was correct in the example given by blewuporstuffed.
Yes but is an attacker being through one on one with the keeper not more advantageous than a free kick?Therefore the advantage has occurred?if he then chooses to take his point or go for goal (no matter what the out come) then that is up to the attacker.
As I said, we came out the right side of this one, but it just didnt seem right to me.

That's a valid argument blewuporstuffed. And the fact that it comes down to the referee's discretion always leads to inconsistencies.
However, I think that the attacker being through one on one is only an advantage if he's able to score it!!!!  :P
The 5 second part of the rule means that the referee has time to see if a REAL advantage has accrued. I should point out that I like this - it's similar to rugby, but with a more certain time limit!

The problem with the old advantage rule was that the decision had to be made pretty much instantaneously. So in your example above you'd have got the free in and most supporters (obviously not you!) would have blinded the ref for not giving an advantage and said he'd have scored a goal if the ref didn't blow the whistle! (or alternatively blinded him not not giving the free in!)
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Hardy on September 11, 2014, 12:34:16 PM
Just as an aside, it's amusing that it seems the majority of spectators don't have a clue about the advantage rule, as evidenced by the howling and booing every time an advantage fails to accrue and the ref calls play back for the free. People either didn't see the the original foul or have assumed he got away with and haven't noticed the referee's raised hand or, if they have, presume he's waving to his mates. Then when he blows apparently for no reason, they go crazy.   

What's not amusing, but annoying, is when paid commentators and overpaid "pundits" react the same way.

That's not to mention the bemusement when the umpires make the "Hawkeye" signal and the same clowns interpret it as the wide signal and then say Hawkeye overruled the umpire, whereupon the producer orders a close-up of the properly performing umpire in order to shame him before the nation.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: magpie seanie on September 11, 2014, 01:05:24 PM
To be fair there are a few refs I know of here in Sligo that ruin around with an arm up in the air all the time, long bofre any advantage rule was thought of!!!
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: AZOffaly on September 11, 2014, 01:07:19 PM
Fascists!!!
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: PAULD123 on September 11, 2014, 01:57:47 PM
Advantage Rule:
When a foul is committed the referee may allow the play to continue if he considers it to be to the advantage of the offended team. He shall signal that advantage by raising an arm upright. If he deems no advantage to have occurred, he may subsequently award a free for that foul from where it occurred*. The referee shall allow the advantage to run by maintaining his arm in the upright position for up to five seconds after the initial foul or for less time if it becomes clear that no advantage has accrued. He shall apply any relevant disciplinary action.”

It's at the referee's discretion as to what he considers an advantage to be.

For me, if a foul is committed which is in a scoreable position then if the attacking team doesn't score within the 5 seconds (regardless of whether they have had a shot at goal or not) then the play should be called back for the free.
IMO, a scoreable free is more advantageous than a shot being saved by the goalkeeper. So therefore I would say the referee was correct in the example given by blewuporstuffed.
Yes but is an attacker being through one on one with the keeper not more advantageous than a free kick?Therefore the advantage has occurred?if he then chooses to take his point or go for goal (no matter what the out come) then that is up to the attacker.
As I said, we came out the right side of this one, but it just didnt seem right to me.

I disagree. Advantage is if you are in a better position because of continuing to play than you would have been if you had stopped for the original free.

Say a team gets a free inside their own 21, the ball is played quickly forward and the attacker gets a shot away within 5 seconds but misses. The free should not be called back, because even though he missed, the ball is now at the other end of the pitch which is about all you could really have hoped for from a deep defensive free.

But say instead an attacker is fouled on the 13m line dead centre. He slips the ball away as he is going down and his team mate blasts a shot wide. Clearly it is very much less advantageous to have a shot wide than a near certain 13m free scored. In this instance I would argue that anything less than a point scored during advantage play is not advantageous over the benefit of a simple free. The play should be called back for the free.

What is an advantage anyway? I say - Did the offended team gain a better position as a result of the advantage than they would have got from the free? And if you are fouled 13m out then yes, I do think the advantage rule effectively means that you are being allowed two shots at the sticks. Having a one-on-one with the keeper is in itself not an advantage, that's just what happened during advantage. Only after the advantage is at an end can a ref make a decision if the team would have been better off with the free and if it is the difference between one point scored and three points missed then it is definitely one point scored puts you in a better position!

Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: westbound on September 12, 2014, 12:22:31 PM
Advantage Rule:
When a foul is committed the referee may allow the play to continue if he considers it to be to the advantage of the offended team. He shall signal that advantage by raising an arm upright. If he deems no advantage to have occurred, he may subsequently award a free for that foul from where it occurred*. The referee shall allow the advantage to run by maintaining his arm in the upright position for up to five seconds after the initial foul or for less time if it becomes clear that no advantage has accrued. He shall apply any relevant disciplinary action.”

It's at the referee's discretion as to what he considers an advantage to be.

For me, if a foul is committed which is in a scoreable position then if the attacking team doesn't score within the 5 seconds (regardless of whether they have had a shot at goal or not) then the play should be called back for the free.
IMO, a scoreable free is more advantageous than a shot being saved by the goalkeeper. So therefore I would say the referee was correct in the example given by blewuporstuffed.
Yes but is an attacker being through one on one with the keeper not more advantageous than a free kick?Therefore the advantage has occurred?if he then chooses to take his point or go for goal (no matter what the out come) then that is up to the attacker.
As I said, we came out the right side of this one, but it just didnt seem right to me.

I disagree. Advantage is if you are in a better position because of continuing to play than you would have been if you had stopped for the original free.

Say a team gets a free inside their own 21, the ball is played quickly forward and the attacker gets a shot away within 5 seconds but misses. The free should not be called back, because even though he missed, the ball is now at the other end of the pitch which is about all you could really have hoped for from a deep defensive free.

But say instead an attacker is fouled on the 13m line dead centre. He slips the ball away as he is going down and his team mate blasts a shot wide. Clearly it is very much less advantageous to have a shot wide than a near certain 13m free scored. In this instance I would argue that anything less than a point scored during advantage play is not advantageous over the benefit of a simple free. The play should be called back for the free.

What is an advantage anyway? I say - Did the offended team gain a better position as a result of the advantage than they would have got from the free? And if you are fouled 13m out then yes, I do think the advantage rule effectively means that you are being allowed two shots at the sticks. Having a one-on-one with the keeper is in itself not an advantage, that's just what happened during advantage. Only after the advantage is at an end can a ref make a decision if the team would have been better off with the free and if it is the difference between one point scored and three points missed then it is definitely one point scored puts you in a better position!

This is exactly what I was trying to say! - You just explained it better!  :)
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: haranguerer on September 12, 2014, 12:39:32 PM
There would need to be certainty of consistency between refs, but it had occurred to me that in an attackng position where a ref has signalled advantage, you should shoot for goal, no matter the angle, distance, etc, as the point would be secure from the free if you miss anyway. Refs dont like anyone being too smart though, so no doubt you'd lose your free no matter the precedents.

In all likelihood the ref is going to be behind you, so seeing an advantage signal could be difficult unless the refs now shout out that they're playing an advantage ala the rugby lads.

In all likelihood if you see a certain foul and are first onto the ball without hearing a whistle, it would be safe to assume there is advantage being played
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: haranguerer on September 12, 2014, 12:40:54 PM
Has a referee ever ordered a penalty to be retaken for a goalkeeper advancing off his line?

Yes
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: macdanger2 on September 21, 2014, 03:42:47 PM
Are players meant to be outside the semicircle on the 21 when a kickout is being taken?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: macdanger2 on September 21, 2014, 10:56:32 PM
Are players meant to be outside the semicircle on the 21 when a kickout is being taken?

Anyone??
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Hardy on September 21, 2014, 11:01:43 PM
No, Mac. The semi circle doesn't come into it. They must be outside the 20m line and more than 13m from the ball.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: macdanger2 on September 21, 2014, 11:04:52 PM
Cheers hardy

Always thought that was the purpose of that semicircle. If not, then is there a reason for it?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: imtommygunn on September 21, 2014, 11:07:20 PM
Defenders have to be outside it for kickouts i think??

Was wondering the same myself with donaghy and the goal.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Hardy on September 21, 2014, 11:14:47 PM
It's just for penalties - all players but goalie and kicker have to be outside it.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: lynchbhoy on September 21, 2014, 11:24:49 PM
Not sure if the 'D' has been modified but it was incorrectly measuring the distance defenders had to be away from the ball at a penalty ( since the penalty spot has been moved forward from the 14 yard line/13 m line) but I don't think the GAA has redrawn the correct distance and new 'D' - they may have , I just haven't heard.

Donaghy was not 13m from the ball for durcans kickout.

The D defines the distance but he didn't have to be outside it. He however wasn't the requisite distance.
But durcan made a schoolboy error and shouldn't have kicked it!
Certainly not with Donaghy lurking so closely!!

Fair play for Donaghy being so alert though
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: macdanger2 on September 21, 2014, 11:27:03 PM
He was at the same against mayo and we almost got caught only that the ref gave us an extremely soft free
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: BennyCake on September 23, 2014, 12:26:39 PM
Keane kicked the ball away when Durcan went to take a kickout. He did similar in Limerick, throwing the spare balls away. Disgusting acts. There has to be a sterner punishment for this sort of behaviour.

Unsurprisingly I didnt hear them mention either on Sunday game either.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Jinxy on September 23, 2014, 12:35:36 PM
Yeah, watching him kick the ball away like that I couldn't help thinking that if I was playing against him and time was almost up, I'd take the red card.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: blewuporstuffed on September 23, 2014, 01:44:31 PM
Keane kicked the ball away when Durcan went to take a kickout. He did similar in Limerick, throwing the spare balls away. Disgusting acts. There has to be a sterner punishment for this sort of behaviour.

Unsurprisingly I didnt hear them mention either on Sunday game either.
That sort of thing is something that should be added to the black card list, however, im not even sure that would be a deterant
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: saffron sam2 on September 23, 2014, 01:53:52 PM
Keane kicked the ball away when Durcan went to take a kickout. He did similar in Limerick, throwing the spare balls away. Disgusting acts. There has to be a sterner punishment for this sort of behaviour.

Unsurprisingly I didnt hear them mention either on Sunday game either.

Niall Morgan says Stevie O'Neill practices that during Tyrone training sessions.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: larryin89 on September 23, 2014, 01:54:21 PM
There are one set of rules for Kerry and then there is the other counties who have to adhere to the ones in the rule book.  Pat  McAneany had a meeting with Eammon Fitz at the dub v Donegal semi final to explain the Kerry rules and had a meeting with Tomas O Se Aug weekend, both were pic with the Don of refs at croker for their meetings. 

Since the ''kerry'' meetings took place the usually outspoken Pat has stayed stum because in no way can he justify Cormac O Reillys display in limerick.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Jinxy on September 23, 2014, 02:30:42 PM
You need to stay on this one Larry.
All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: J OGorman on September 23, 2014, 02:38:37 PM
You need to stay on this one Larry.
All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.

+1. Larry, yer like a wee dog let out in a big field. Go gettum
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Hardy on September 23, 2014, 03:05:10 PM

Keane kicked the ball away when Durcan went to take a kickout. He did similar in Limerick, throwing the spare balls away. Disgusting acts. There has to be a sterner punishment for this sort of behaviour.


Unsurprisingly I didnt hear them mention either on Sunday game either.
That sort of thing is something that should be added to the black card list, however, im not even sure that would be a deterant

Ah lads. Is there no room for a bit of comedy in the game?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: larryin89 on September 23, 2014, 03:35:53 PM
Why was pat pic with them ? Why has pat not reviewed the Limerick shambles of a refereeing job after such an outcry not only by the ordinary joe like myself but by tsg s Kevin mcstay on tsg?

What did Liam O Neill by '' if mayo know whats good for them , they'll just get on with it''? Whats good for us a low interest rate on a loan perhaps?

Look at Liam O fat face neills talk at the Kerry hotel on sunday night, are ye blinded, he just said '' my black card rule won the day cause the best footballers in Ireland Kerry won the sam maguire'' he said it with fooking gusto . The little fat bollix.

Of course you're laughing at lil old me with my little bitter bursts but if you examine the whole situation , there is surely an element of truth in what im saying
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: johnneycool on September 23, 2014, 03:38:41 PM
Why was pat pic with them ? Why has pat not reviewed the Limerick shambles of a refereeing job after such an outcry not only by the ordinary joe like myself but by tsg s Kevin mcstay on tsg?

What did Liam O Neill by '' if mayo know whats good for them , they'll just get on with it''? Whats good for us a low interest rate on a loan perhaps?

Look at Liam O fat face neills talk at the Kerry hotel on sunday night, are ye blinded, he just said '' my black card rule won the day cause the best footballers in Ireland Kerry won the sam maguire'' he said it with fooking gusto . The little fat bollix.

Of course you're laughing at lil old me with my little bitter bursts but if you examine the whole situation , there is surely an element of truth in what im saying

Aye that was a bit cringe alright, sour faced auld bollox is always on message no matter the occasion, only one black card dished out from the quarter finals on, not one bit of cynical play thereafter, yeah it worked a treat if you're one of the lesser lights.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: naka on September 23, 2014, 04:43:05 PM
Keane kicked the ball away when Durcan went to take a kickout. He did similar in Limerick, throwing the spare balls away. Disgusting acts. There has to be a sterner punishment for this sort of behaviour.

Unsurprisingly I didnt hear them mention either on Sunday game either.
thought it was a despicable act by keane
was not surprised that no mention was made of it on tv
wasn't surprised at no mention by pat about the reilly shambles in limerick either
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: BennyCake on September 23, 2014, 05:11:59 PM
Keane kicked the ball away when Durcan went to take a kickout. He did similar in Limerick, throwing the spare balls away. Disgusting acts. There has to be a sterner punishment for this sort of behaviour.

Unsurprisingly I didnt hear them mention either on Sunday game either.
thought it was a despicable act by keane
was not surprised that no mention was made of it on tv
wasn't surprised at no mention by pat about the reilly shambles in limerick either

All you'll hear from Spillane is we have the most AIs, we're team of the decade, aren't we a great county, everyone else plays puke football but not us. He's like a child. Why he's still in the media I'll never know.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: BennyCake on September 23, 2014, 06:28:43 PM
What's the rule on a player jumping into a tackle? Both feet were off the ground and he just jumped into a defender. I think it was Young or Keane did it. It resulted in a handy free for Keane. Might have been just before the goal.

It should have been a free out for charging should it not?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: tyroneman on September 23, 2014, 08:42:20 PM
What's the rule on a player jumping into a tackle? Both feet were off the ground and he just jumped into a defender. I think it was Young or Keane did it. It resulted in a handy free for Keane. Might have been just before the goal.

It should have been a free out for charging should it not?

Yip. In my book that's a free out.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: David McKeown on September 24, 2014, 01:17:20 AM
Going back to the advantage rule if I may.

For me it's a nonsense how some referees are currently interpreting it. Getting a shot at goal from a better position than a free is by definition an advantage. If it goes wide or is saved that's neither here nor there. The advantage was the shot. If an attacker doesn't want that advantage then fine just stop and take the free.

The idea of waiting to see the outcome of a shot is ludicrous. The rule isn't there to give a team two bites at the cherry. It's there for stopping defending teams benefitting when they cheat and break the rules.

If the attacking team wins a free and takes immediately and miss it do they get another chance at the free? 

Also the idea of waiting the full 5 seconds to see if a score has occurred is rubbish what about a high hanging shot from distance taken 5 seconds after the foul. Is the ref supposed to guess where it's going to land? Ie given he's only allowed 5 seconds does he blow for the free in case it falls into the keepers hands or does he wait to see if it makes it over.

As I say it's usualy perfectly obvious which is more advantageous the shot or the free. A free shot at goal from a better angle or shorter distance is more advantageous than a long range. A shot from a tight angle or with multiple defenders around is not. Similarly a shot a goal is more advantageous than a 13m free.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: blewuporstuffed on September 24, 2014, 08:19:00 AM
What's the rule on a player jumping into a tackle? Both feet were off the ground and he just jumped into a defender. I think it was Young or Keane did it. It resulted in a handy free for Keane. Might have been just before the goal.

It should have been a free out for charging should it not?

Yip. In my book that's a free out.
yeah i think it should be a free out, i dont know how the defenders in that situation could have done anything differently to avoid 'fouling' him, bar standing out of the way
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: blewuporstuffed on September 24, 2014, 08:23:32 AM
Going back to the advantage rule if I may.

For me it's a nonsense how some referees are currently interpreting it. Getting a shot at goal from a better position than a free is by definition an advantage. If it goes wide or is saved that's neither here nor there. The advantage was the shot. If an attacker doesn't want that advantage then fine just stop and take the free.

The idea of waiting to see the outcome of a shot is ludicrous. The rule isn't there to give a team two bites at the cherry. It's there for stopping defending teams benefitting when they cheat and break the rules.

If the attacking team wins a free and takes immediately and miss it do they get another chance at the free? 

Also the idea of waiting the full 5 seconds to see if a score has occurred is rubbish what about a high hanging shot from distance taken 5 seconds after the foul. Is the ref supposed to guess where it's going to land? Ie given he's only allowed 5 seconds does he blow for the free in case it falls into the keepers hands or does he wait to see if it makes it over.

As I say it's usualy perfectly obvious which is more advantageous the shot or the free. A free shot at goal from a better angle or shorter distance is more advantageous than a long range. A shot from a tight angle or with multiple defenders around is not. Similarly a shot a goal is more advantageous than a 13m free.
This was exactly my point aswell., and in the example i gave, we were the benefactors of it, but if just didnt seem right to me.
IMO 9/10 when its in a scoring position , the referee should just blow the free, the only time he should allow the advantage is when the player gets away and is through on goal or has a very obviously easier shot at goal.
The advantage rule should only really be used more further out the feild, where the referee can let the play go on a bit more rather than stopping for a free. This is an advantage to teh time on the ball as it doesnt allow the defending team to purposely slow the game down by fouling.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: westbound on September 24, 2014, 09:41:43 AM
Going back to the advantage rule if I may.

For me it's a nonsense how some referees are currently interpreting it. Getting a shot at goal from a better position than a free is by definition an advantage. If it goes wide or is saved that's neither here nor there. The advantage was the shot. If an attacker doesn't want that advantage then fine just stop and take the free.

The idea of waiting to see the outcome of a shot is ludicrous. The rule isn't there to give a team two bites at the cherry. It's there for stopping defending teams benefitting when they cheat and break the rules.

If the attacking team wins a free and takes immediately and miss it do they get another chance at the free? 

Also the idea of waiting the full 5 seconds to see if a score has occurred is rubbish what about a high hanging shot from distance taken 5 seconds after the foul. Is the ref supposed to guess where it's going to land? Ie given he's only allowed 5 seconds does he blow for the free in case it falls into the keepers hands or does he wait to see if it makes it over.

As I say it's usualy perfectly obvious which is more advantageous the shot or the free. A free shot at goal from a better angle or shorter distance is more advantageous than a long range. A shot from a tight angle or with multiple defenders around is not. Similarly a shot a goal is more advantageous than a 13m free.

I would disagree with this. A point (presumably guaranteed from the 13m free) is better for the attacking team than a wide or a save (presuming the shot at goal was not scored).

Also, even under the old advantage rule, if the player got a shot at goal away as he was being fouled; if it went in the ref would allow the goal and if it didn't the ref would give the free in. The difference being that under the old rule the ref had to make the decision instantaneously whereas now he has 5 seconds to decide.

As I mentioned in an earlier post, I like the way the refs are applying the advantage rule. It's very much like the advantage rule in rugby except that there is a definite length of time the advantage can be played. It benefits the attacking team and surely that's the whole purpose, i.e to punish the team who fouls!
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: PAULD123 on September 24, 2014, 10:24:04 AM
Going back to the advantage rule if I may.

For me it's a nonsense how some referees are currently interpreting it. Getting a shot at goal from a better position than a free is by definition an advantage. If it goes wide or is saved that's neither here nor there. The advantage was the shot. If an attacker doesn't want that advantage then fine just stop and take the free.

The idea of waiting to see the outcome of a shot is ludicrous. The rule isn't there to give a team two bites at the cherry. It's there for stopping defending teams benefitting when they cheat and break the rules.

If the attacking team wins a free and takes immediately and miss it do they get another chance at the free? 

Also the idea of waiting the full 5 seconds to see if a score has occurred is rubbish what about a high hanging shot from distance taken 5 seconds after the foul. Is the ref supposed to guess where it's going to land? Ie given he's only allowed 5 seconds does he blow for the free in case it falls into the keepers hands or does he wait to see if it makes it over.

As I say it's usualy perfectly obvious which is more advantageous the shot or the free. A free shot at goal from a better angle or shorter distance is more advantageous than a long range. A shot from a tight angle or with multiple defenders around is not. Similarly a shot a goal is more advantageous than a 13m free.

I disagree with you David. I agree with Westbound. The advantage is there to make sure a team is no worse off by getting a free or playing on. If you have a central 13m free then you are virtually guaranteed a point. The only thing more advantageous is an actual point (or goal). Having a shot at goal saved is less advantageous to the team than having a point. Therefore in final analysis no advantage occurred. So the free should be called back because after the snap shot is saved, as it is then clear it would have been better to have awarded the original free.

But think about it. An attacker is running clean-through on goal. He is fouled. What has happened is the defender is sacrificing a point for a goal chance. Clearly as a minimum the attacker deserves a simple free but he has still been cheated. So the advantage rule allows him to pass to teammate to have that goal chance. But by now it is a much worse goal chance than the clean-through attacker would have had. If you don't call back the free when the goal shot is saved then the cheater still wins. He denied a clear goal chance and the attacking team is told it is to their advantage to have a less good goal chance. That is self-contradictory.

Unless you allow the free to be called back then you are by definition being disadvantageous. If a defender cheats a player out a single shot then I see no problem is saying the advantage is in effect a free less good shot with a guaranteed free kick to come (just like in rugby)
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: David McKeown on September 24, 2014, 04:53:23 PM
Ok so am I right in thinking that you feel it should always be a free unless the ball has been put into the net or over the bar within 5 seconds so that even if a player is fouled takes 2 seconds to escape the foul another 3 seconds to advance towards goal and then shoots the free must come back because when the 5 seconds were up the ball hadn't yet been scored (even had it clearly been going in)?  To me thats a nonsense, the advantage is the shot if the attacking team don't want the advantage then simply don't take the shot.

Also the idea of giving a team two bites at the cherry should only encourage more effectively fouling to prevent that second opportunity.

Why is a team awarded two opportunities to score when advantage is played but not when a free is awarded?

The comparison to rugby I don't get either the relative value of a free in GAA v a penalty in rugby is completely different.  An average rugby match would have far fewer scoring opportunities than a GAA game so a similar advantage rule should not be applied.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: yellowcard on September 24, 2014, 05:40:50 PM
The biggest problem in gaelic football at the minute is the influence that a referee can have over the outcome of a match. I could pick out any given match and probably pull out at least 15 incidences where a referee could justify giving a decision either way yet at the same time he could just as easily justify not giving the same decision. Too many times the rules are applied based on the referees interpretation. Its a worse situation at club level where the referees are under less scrutiny, they are of a poorer standard and worst of all they are biased against one side.   
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: PAULD123 on September 24, 2014, 05:58:51 PM
Ok so am I right in thinking that you feel it should always be a free unless the ball has been put into the net or over the bar within 5 seconds so that even if a player is fouled takes 2 seconds to escape the foul another 3 seconds to advance towards goal and then shoots the free must come back because when the 5 seconds were up the ball hadn't yet been scored (even had it clearly been going in)?  To me thats a nonsense, the advantage is the shot if the attacking team don't want the advantage then simply don't take the shot.

Also the idea of giving a team two bites at the cherry should only encourage more effectively fouling to prevent that second opportunity.

Why is a team awarded two opportunities to score when advantage is played but not when a free is awarded?

The comparison to rugby I don't get either the relative value of a free in GAA v a penalty in rugby is completely different.  An average rugby match would have far fewer scoring opportunities than a GAA game so a similar advantage rule should not be applied.

Ok firstly, I certainly do think 5 seconds is way too long. 2-3 seconds is more than enough to decide on advantage. So I think we agree on that one.

I also think you make a good point about scores in rugby being harder to come by, but that doesn't change the fact that a point is always more advantageous than a miss.

If the defender fouls so absolutely that no advantage could ever occur then he will be getting a booking of black card. So fair enough, let them foul to that level if they want, they won't be doing it for long.

As for two opportunities - It is because they have been cheated out of a really good opportunity. If a defender wants to cheat a fella then he should be punished. Allowing only a less good chance is effectively rewarding the cheater. In the advantage play the attacking team should definitely be allowed a crack at the maximum and if that doesn't come off then be allowed to come back fro a crack at the minimum which is the minimum you desire for being hauled down 13m out.

It would be better and simpler to say that any free within 21m is always called back if no score is made in the following 2 seconds. Any free outside 21m depends solely on the chance to get a good possession/pass/shot away.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: yellowcard on September 24, 2014, 07:36:21 PM
Keane kicked the ball away when Durcan went to take a kickout. He did similar in Limerick, throwing the spare balls away. Disgusting acts. There has to be a sterner punishment for this sort of behaviour.

Unsurprisingly I didnt hear them mention either on Sunday game either.
thought it was a despicable act by keane
was not surprised that no mention was made of it on tv
wasn't surprised at no mention by pat about the reilly shambles in limerick either

It was on a par with Cavanagh pulling down McManus last year and yet it never got mentioned once by any of the pundits in the aftermath. He deserved a good thump but Durcan was still reeling from his own mistake earlier in the match. It's the hypocrisy that is baffling. I don't have much time for Cavanagh but if he had done what Keane done there would have been an outcry. Instead we are constantly fed a diet of garbage that the best footballers playing football in its purest form are Kerry footballers. Rubbish if you ask me.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Hardy on September 25, 2014, 12:22:00 PM
Keane kicked the ball away when Durcan went to take a kickout. He did similar in Limerick, throwing the spare balls away. Disgusting acts. There has to be a sterner punishment for this sort of behaviour.

Unsurprisingly I didnt hear them mention either on Sunday game either.
thought it was a despicable act by keane
was not surprised that no mention was made of it on tv
wasn't surprised at no mention by pat about the reilly shambles in limerick either

It was on a par with Cavanagh pulling down McManus last year

Ah come on now.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Asal Mor on September 25, 2014, 02:26:53 PM
It was worse than Cavanagh, who just did what he had to do. But I'd call it childish rather than disgusting. A fart sniffing fetish is disgusting.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: FermGael on November 09, 2014, 09:03:00 PM
Decided to go up to Owenbeg this afternoon and watch the Ulster Club games.
Two decisions by the referee puzzled me.
1. Slaughtneil defender was soloing out of defence with the ball. He bounced the ball and then lost control of the ball. He regained control by bouncing the ball one handed like a basketball player would and the referee gave a free against him for a double bounce. Was the referee correct?
2. Cavan Gaels player was tackled well and fisted the ball away.  The ball bounced once and the same player regained possession.  The referee played on. Was the referee correct ?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Zulu on November 09, 2014, 09:08:59 PM
No to first one and yes to second question.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: brokencrossbar1 on November 10, 2014, 09:37:54 AM
No to first one and yes to second question.

I actually think that the ref was right in the first time as well.  The rule about a 'controlling' bounce was implemented a few seasons ago if I recall.  The rule is pretty clear and unambiguous

4.6 To bounce the ball more than once
consecutively after catching it.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: brianboru00 on November 10, 2014, 10:20:52 AM
You have to read the entire rule book

1.5 When the ball has not been caught, it may be
bounced more than once in succession.


and in the "important terms and  definitions" section:
1. BOUNCE For a player who has caught
the ball to play the ball against
the ground with his hand(s)
and to catch it on


Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: brokencrossbar1 on November 10, 2014, 10:42:17 AM
You have to read the entire rule book

1.5 When the ball has not been caught, it may be
bounced more than once in succession.


and in the "important terms and  definitions" section:
1. BOUNCE For a player who has caught
the ball to play the ball against
the ground with his hand(s)
and to catch it on


Fair enough,  I thought I read somewhere that this rule had been abolished
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: brianboru00 on November 10, 2014, 10:55:26 AM
not sure - I thought they had actually included a reference to basketball - but that may have been the clarification :
http://www.gaa.ie/content/documents/publications/rules/Summary_of_Playing_Rule_changes_2010.pdf

The rule has been there for many years but the 2010 changes was clarifying this to give a clearer definition.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Rossfan on November 10, 2014, 11:24:13 AM
You have to read the entire rule book

1.5 When the ball has not been caught, it may be
bounced more than once in succession.


and in the "important terms and  definitions" section:
1. BOUNCE For a player who has caught
the ball to play the ball against
the ground with his hand(s)
and to catch it on


Fair enough,  I thought I read somewhere that this rule had been abolished

Always better to read the oul Treoir Oifigiúil
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Croí na hÉireann on November 10, 2014, 03:01:38 PM
The basketball dribble is a great subvention of the "only one solo" training matches.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: AZOffaly on November 10, 2014, 03:59:35 PM
You have to read the entire rule book

1.5 When the ball has not been caught, it may be
bounced more than once in succession.


and in the "important terms and  definitions" section:
1. BOUNCE For a player who has caught
the ball to play the ball against
the ground with his hand(s)
and to catch it on


Fair enough,  I thought I read somewhere that this rule had been abolished

Always better to read the oul Treoir Oifigiúil

Is that not self contradictory? If the definition of a bounce includes catching it, how can a ball be bounced more than once in succession?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Jell 0 Biafra on November 10, 2014, 04:30:35 PM
And since a contradiction logically implies everything, nothing is forbidden in football. 
Title: Seo
Post by: drici on November 18, 2014, 09:55:29 AM
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24-week suspension for Donegal dual player after social media comment

Social media

BY CHRIS MCNULTY

IN what is believed to be the first case of its kind in Donegal GAA, a club player has been given a proposed 24-week suspension because of comments posted on social media.

Seán Mac Cumhaills’ player David White, who plays football and hurling for the Twin Towns club, has been singled out over a comment following the Donegal SFC quarter-final between Ardara and Naomh Conaill.

In response to a message from the official Donegal GAA account which confirmed that the drawn quarter-final would be replayed that Wednesday night, White is understood to have posted a tweet that was critical of the decision not to play extra-time in the fixture.

The dual star is understood to have posted a similar message on Facebook and County Board chiefs have reacted by handing down the ban. It is likely that the sanction, believed by the relevant parties to be ‘extremely excessive’ will be appealed.

The decision to serve notice of a lengthy ban for social media comments will flash the alarm sirens around the county with club players’ social media activity under scrutiny.

GAA members had been warned by the Donegal County Board in August of this year that they could face disciplinary action over comments made on social media websites.

The secretary of the Donegal Co Board, Aodh Mairtín Ó Fearraigh, also issued an email to club secretaries at that time urging them to make their members aware of the GAA’s social media policies.

That letter outlined that all GAA members are encouraged to take part in social media but the Association expects each individual to follow the guidelines on using social media.

“I would ask all clubs to remind their members and players of the implications of referring to the GAA in social media when they do.

“Each member is to adhere to the GAA’s Official Guide and Club Constitution, as well as other applicable documents. All GAA members are subject to the GAA Code of Behaviour when online, even when they are not acting on behalf of the Association.”
http://donegalnews.com/2014/11/24-week-suspension-for-donegal-dual-player-after-social-media-comment/#sthash.DhRzShsT.mmvPYAuT.dpuf
Title: Re: Seo
Post by: orangeman on November 18, 2014, 11:03:40 AM
visitors can't see pics , please register or login

24-week suspension for Donegal dual player after social media comment

Social media

BY CHRIS MCNULTY

IN what is believed to be the first case of its kind in Donegal GAA, a club player has been given a proposed 24-week suspension because of comments posted on social media.

Seán Mac Cumhaills’ player David White, who plays football and hurling for the Twin Towns club, has been singled out over a comment following the Donegal SFC quarter-final between Ardara and Naomh Conaill.

In response to a message from the official Donegal GAA account which confirmed that the drawn quarter-final would be replayed that Wednesday night, White is understood to have posted a tweet that was critical of the decision not to play extra-time in the fixture.

The dual star is understood to have posted a similar message on Facebook and County Board chiefs have reacted by handing down the ban. It is likely that the sanction, believed by the relevant parties to be ‘extremely excessive’ will be appealed.

The decision to serve notice of a lengthy ban for social media comments will flash the alarm sirens around the county with club players’ social media activity under scrutiny.

GAA members had been warned by the Donegal County Board in August of this year that they could face disciplinary action over comments made on social media websites.

The secretary of the Donegal Co Board, Aodh Mairtín Ó Fearraigh, also issued an email to club secretaries at that time urging them to make their members aware of the GAA’s social media policies.

That letter outlined that all GAA members are encouraged to take part in social media but the Association expects each individual to follow the guidelines on using social media.

“I would ask all clubs to remind their members and players of the implications of referring to the GAA in social media when they do.

“Each member is to adhere to the GAA’s Official Guide and Club Constitution, as well as other applicable documents. All GAA members are subject to the GAA Code of Behaviour when online, even when they are not acting on behalf of the Association.”
http://donegalnews.com/2014/11/24-week-suspension-for-donegal-dual-player-after-social-media-comment/#sthash.DhRzShsT.mmvPYAuT.dpuf

Slippery slope. Another stick to beat themselves with.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: blanketattack on November 18, 2014, 11:30:54 AM
A couple of rule related questions.
1. A forward is behind the goal line, in the net essentially. A long ball is kicked in (from play) and he moves out in front of the goalie, flicking the ball to the net. Goal or no goal?
2. Same situation but the goalie punches the attacker while he is still behind the goal line. What does the ref give (besides a red card)?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: DuffleKing on November 18, 2014, 11:37:09 AM

1) Technically, if a player leaves the field of play he cannot reenter without permission from the referee. Free out.
2) Assuming the referee stops play to deal with the incident, play restarts with a free to the team in possession from which they cannot score
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Farrandeelin on November 18, 2014, 08:41:47 PM
If a player remonstrates with a linesman over a lineball decision, does he get a yellow card?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: muppet on November 18, 2014, 09:11:53 PM
If a player remonstrates with a linesman over a lineball decision, does he get a yellow card?

Yes.

But if he is from Donegal and does it on Twitter he gets a 24 weeks ban.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: fiabhras gael on November 20, 2014, 05:59:47 PM
Anyone know what is the length of term a club chairman can stay in the seat
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Zulu on November 20, 2014, 06:17:55 PM
5 years for all position I think.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: macdanger2 on April 08, 2015, 01:26:20 PM
In the game in Castlebar on Sunday, the Mayo crowd went mad when the Donegal back collected a kickout inside his own 21. Personally, I thought it was ok because he was outside the 21 when the ball was kicked and it's ok to move inside to collect.

On Mad West on the way home though, they said that the rule had been changed from the 21 to the 14 - can anyone confirm this?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: AZOffaly on April 08, 2015, 01:29:12 PM
We played a game last year, and the ref was specific. You have to be outside 13 metres from the kick out when it is taken, but you could run into collect it. (Not like soccer where you have to touch it outside the box). So a kick out from the 13 metre line, factoring in the exclusion 'D' is basically outside the 20 metre line and the D.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: AZOffaly on April 08, 2015, 01:33:17 PM
Here's the rule

2.7 (a) When the ball is played over the endline by
the Team attacking that end, or after a score
is made, play is restarted by a kick-out off the
ground from the 13m line and within the large
rectangle.
 If the goalkeeper is not taking the kick-out, he
shall stay in the small rectangle, and all other
players, except the player taking the kick-out,
shall be outside the 20m line and 13m from
the ball, until it has been kicked.
 The player taking a kick-out may kick the
ball more than once before any other player
touches it but may not take the ball into his
hands.
 The ball shall travel 13m before being played
by another player of the defending team.


So therefore you could technically kick the ball 13 metres sideways (which is what our goalie did in that game) and as long as the defender was outside the 20 metre line at the time the ball was kicked, he could run in and get it.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: macdanger2 on April 08, 2015, 02:00:47 PM
Cheers AZ
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: BennyCake on April 26, 2015, 01:08:55 PM
Can a player take a sideline kick from the ground if he wishes?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: JoG2 on May 15, 2015, 11:00:24 AM
was just reading there on gaa.ie that:

'The ball used in Gaelic Football is round, slightly smaller than a soccer ball'.

I've played both sports pretty much all my life but I always thought both balls were the same size, with the A'Neils being heavier. Everyday's a school day
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: brokencrossbar1 on May 15, 2015, 11:08:25 AM
Here's the rule

2.7 (a) When the ball is played over the endline by
the Team attacking that end, or after a score
is made, play is restarted by a kick-out off the
ground from the 13m line and within the large
rectangle.
 If the goalkeeper is not taking the kick-out, he
shall stay in the small rectangle, and all other
players, except the player taking the kick-out,
shall be outside the 20m line and 13m from
the ball, until it has been kicked.
 The player taking a kick-out may kick the
ball more than once before any other player
touches it but may not take the ball into his
hands.
 The ball shall travel 13m before being played
by another player of the defending team.


So therefore you could technically kick the ball 13 metres sideways (which is what our goalie did in that game) and as long as the defender was outside the 20 metre line at the time the ball was kicked, he could run in and get it.

Alternatively your full back could take the kick out backwards towards the goalkeeper,  so long as it traveled 13 m and the goalie started off in the small square and then the FB could take the return pass.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: DuffleKing on May 15, 2015, 11:26:49 AM
5 years for all position I think.

That's a county level regulation only?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: twohands!!! on May 15, 2015, 01:28:56 PM
5 years for all position I think.

That's a county level regulation only?

Yup
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: macdanger2 on April 15, 2017, 10:33:21 PM
I was chatting to my nephew who plays U12 for a club in Dublin earlier and he's convinced that there's a rule against 1) using two hands to tackle the ball and 2) using anything other than the "near" hand to tackle (he wasn't able to explain what the "near" hand was when you're tackling front on, but anyway)

While I realise that both of these are good practice i.e. you're less likely to foul the playerl; I'm fairly certain that neither are actual rules. Can anyone confirm??
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: hardstation on April 15, 2017, 10:42:37 PM
I was chatting to my nephew who plays U12 for a club in Dublin earlier and he's convinced that there's a rule against 1) using two hands to tackle the ball and 2) using anything other than the "near" hand to tackle (he wasn't able to explain what the "near" hand was when you're tackling front on, but anyway)

While I realise that both of these are good practice i.e. you're less likely to foul the playerl; I'm fairly certain that neither are actual rules. Can anyone confirm??
There are no rules regarding tackling in Gaelic Football. That page of the rule book just says, "Whatever you think yourself".
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: macdanger2 on April 15, 2017, 11:31:41 PM
 ;D ;D

We did discuss that alright
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: ONeill on April 18, 2017, 11:50:10 AM
Can you lift a team mate up to catch the ball, like in a line-out in rugby? Be deadly for the smallish Tyrone lads trying to get a mark.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: John Martin on April 18, 2017, 12:39:46 PM
Does a goalkeeper have any sort of exemption from the foot block rule?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Main Street on April 20, 2017, 11:01:53 PM
Can you lift a team mate up to catch the ball, like in a line-out in rugby? Be deadly for the smallish Tyrone lads trying to get a mark.

Check out the  'GAA for Dummies' book, if there is one,
until now I didn't think there was a need for one.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Hardy on April 21, 2017, 12:44:37 PM
Can you lift a team mate up to catch the ball, like in a line-out in rugby? Be deadly for the smallish Tyrone lads trying to get a mark.

There's no rule against it. So if you did it and the ref blew it, it'd be interesting to hear his reason and what rule he was invoking.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: rrhf on April 21, 2017, 01:22:26 PM
the ban on foreign sports
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: vallankumous on April 22, 2017, 08:37:49 AM
Can a few carry a player on his shoulders while he holds the ball high in the air?

This would mean the ball carrier could cover the distance of the pitch without taking any steps and there is no determination on how long it might take to take 4 steps.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: BennyCake on April 22, 2017, 09:39:56 AM
Can you lift a team mate up to catch the ball, like in a line-out in rugby? Be deadly for the smallish Tyrone lads trying to get a mark.

There's no rule against it. So if you did it and the ref blew it, it'd be interesting to hear his reason and what rule he was invoking.

If that's the case, could a player be lifted up to sit/stand on the crossbar to prevent a winning point?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: The Stallion on April 22, 2017, 10:23:52 AM
Are there any transgender players within the GAA? Do the GAA rules address gender fluidity at all?

I know there have been several high profile cases in other sports which caused controversy.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: BennyCake on April 22, 2017, 11:41:57 AM
Are there any transgender players within the GAA? Do the GAA rules address gender fluidity at all?

I know there have been several high profile cases in other sports which caused controversy.

I wonder then, if Northern counties will have to have a percentage of their starting 15 made up of such players, to fall in line with Fair Employment/Equality legislation?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Ball Hopper on April 22, 2017, 10:25:12 PM
Can a few carry a player on his shoulders while he holds the ball high in the air?

This would mean the ball carrier could cover the distance of the pitch without taking any steps and there is no determination on how long it might take to take 4 steps.

Or how long will a player in possession stand absolutely still before a ref gives a free against him?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: DuffleKing on April 22, 2017, 10:39:51 PM
Can a few carry a player on his shoulders while he holds the ball high in the air?

This would mean the ball carrier could cover the distance of the pitch without taking any steps and there is no determination on how long it might take to take 4 steps.

Or how long will a player in possession stand absolutely still before a ref gives a free against him?

So we're just pretending not to know the rules now
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Ball Hopper on April 22, 2017, 10:54:44 PM
Can a few carry a player on his shoulders while he holds the ball high in the air?

This would mean the ball carrier could cover the distance of the pitch without taking any steps and there is no determination on how long it might take to take 4 steps.

Or how long will a player in possession stand absolutely still before a ref gives a free against him?

So we're just pretending not to know the rules now

From the "Important Terms and Definitions" part of the rulebook, in case anyone was wondering:

13. OVERCARRY
To take more than four steps while holding the ball in the hand(s).

14. OVERHOLD
To hold the ball longer than is required to take four steps.

Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Farrandeelin on April 22, 2017, 11:11:37 PM
Could this thread be made a sticky?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: ONeill on April 23, 2017, 10:42:55 AM
Can you lift a team mate up to catch the ball, like in a line-out in rugby? Be deadly for the smallish Tyrone lads trying to get a mark.

There's no rule against it. So if you did it and the ref blew it, it'd be interesting to hear his reason and what rule he was invoking.

If that's the case, could a player be lifted up to sit/stand on the crossbar to prevent a winning point?

Can't believe Jimmy McGuinness didn't try it.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Hardy on April 23, 2017, 12:30:55 PM
14. OVERHOLD
To hold the ball longer than is required to take four steps.

This is the type of shyte that make the Offical Guide a laugh. If you're standing still, the time to take four steps is infinity. If they mean the time required to take four steps if you weren't standing still, what sort of nonsense is that? If your imaginary steps (that you're not taking, remember) were running-flat-out steps, the time to take four of them might be 0.75 of a second. But the referee might be imagining walking steps, as the rules don't tell him otherwise. Four of those might take 3 seconds.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Ball Hopper on April 23, 2017, 09:54:36 PM
14. OVERHOLD
To hold the ball longer than is required to take four steps.

This is the type of shyte that make the Offical Guide a laugh. If you're standing still, the time to take four steps is infinity. If they mean the time required to take four steps if you weren't standing still, what sort of nonsense is that? If your imaginary steps (that you're not taking, remember) were running-flat-out steps, the time to take four of them might be 0.75 of a second. But the referee might be imagining walking steps, as the rules don't tell him otherwise. Four of those might take 3 seconds.

Be a lot easier if they said 4 seconds...
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: DuffleKing on April 23, 2017, 10:58:49 PM

You'd get a lot more than 4 steps in 4 seconds
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: ONeill on April 23, 2017, 11:00:23 PM
Not if you're playing in Omagh on a wet day.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Main Street on April 23, 2017, 11:54:53 PM
Can you lift a team mate up to catch the ball, like in a line-out in rugby? Be deadly for the smallish Tyrone lads trying to get a mark.

There's no rule against it. So if you did it and the ref blew it, it'd be interesting to hear his reason and what rule he was invoking.

If that's the case, could a player be lifted up to sit/stand on the crossbar to prevent a winning point?
:)
Agreed, but why not have 3 players on the crossbar (strength permitting of course) just to be sure of stopping the ball before it crossed the bar, as it is not written in the rules (or the book of genesis) that we can't?
For that matter, there is no rule saying we can't shove the ball up the jersey, take 4 giant leaps and give birth to ball in a more advantageous location on the pitch.
Yes ref, what do you have to say about that?


Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: BennyCake on June 05, 2017, 10:46:00 PM
Just read Louth Meath report. Meath made a late change to their goalkeeper, and apparently that meant they'd used up one of their subs before the match had even started.

What's that all about then? Teams are forever making last minute changes and it doesn't count towards their sub allocation.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: manfromdelmonte on June 05, 2017, 11:16:49 PM
Just read Louth Meath report. Meath made a late change to their goalkeeper, and apparently that meant they'd used up one of their subs before the match had even started.

What's that all about then? Teams are forever making last minute changes and it doesn't count towards their sub allocation.
why was he in the goal getting his hat when the 2nd goal went in???
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: BennyCake on June 05, 2017, 11:56:57 PM
Just read Louth Meath report. Meath made a late change to their goalkeeper, and apparently that meant they'd used up one of their subs before the match had even started.

What's that all about then? Teams are forever making last minute changes and it doesn't count towards their sub allocation.
why was he in the goal getting his hat when the 2nd goal went in???

Mis-read that, it wasn't the goalie, but half forward.

And yeah, that was a strange one. Was like Paddy Cullen blind-folded!
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Norf Tyrone on June 06, 2017, 08:45:23 AM
Just read Louth Meath report. Meath made a late change to their goalkeeper, and apparently that meant they'd used up one of their subs before the match had even started.

What's that all about then? Teams are forever making last minute changes and it doesn't count towards their sub allocation.

I believe if its after you've submitted the teams to the ref 30 mins before throw in you are locked in.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: twohands!!! on June 06, 2017, 09:45:03 AM
Just read Louth Meath report. Meath made a late change to their goalkeeper, and apparently that meant they'd used up one of their subs before the match had even started.

What's that all about then? Teams are forever making last minute changes and it doesn't count towards their sub allocation.

I believe if its after you've submitted the teams to the ref 30 mins before throw in you are locked in.

Yeah - I think it's a newish enough rule and only for intercounty iirc - within the last 3/4 years at Congress.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: tyroneman on June 10, 2017, 07:14:26 PM
One that you rarely see is the sideline ball being moved infield.

Pretty sure if the ref is being given cheek he can move the sideline kick onto the pitch playing area if it is more adventageous, just like he can move a normal free closer to goal.

Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Smokin Joe on June 10, 2017, 07:56:27 PM
One that you rarely see is the sideline ball being moved infield.

Pretty sure if the ref is being given cheek he can move the sideline kick onto the pitch playing area if it is more adventageous, just like he can move a normal free closer to goal.

The ref did this on one occasion last week in the Down v Armagh game.  I remember thinking that it looked odd (as its not normally done)
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Minus15 on June 13, 2017, 05:26:54 PM
It happened in one of the games in at the weekend there too, I always thought 'you couldn't move up a sideline ball'. Was this a myth or did the rule change at some point?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: BennyCake on June 21, 2017, 05:46:41 PM
Blood subs...

I thought when the rule was introduced, the blood sub coming on had to wear a coloured armband signifying he was a blood sub?

Maybe someone could clarify.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Rossfan on June 21, 2017, 06:53:52 PM
That was done originally alright.
However that was probably too transparent for the GAA and it had to be stopped.
Blood sub rule needs some tidying up.
As it is the Ref tells a lad to go off and a temporary sub comes on. It's up to his manager then how long to leave him on for and there seems to be no time limit which leaves it open to abuse.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: mrdeeds on June 21, 2017, 07:26:07 PM
It happened in one of the games in at the weekend there too, I always thought 'you couldn't move up a sideline ball'. Was this a myth or did the rule change at some point?

Think it used to be that it could be moved in field but not forward but rule amended to allow it to be moved towards oposition goal.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Rossfan on June 22, 2017, 12:29:37 PM
I hear Jarlath's Rules Committee are bringing a tweak to the kick out before the Special Hurley Congress - that the ball has to go outside the 20m line.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: BennyCake on June 22, 2017, 01:40:42 PM
That was done originally alright.
However that was probably too transparent for the GAA and it had to be stopped.
Blood sub rule needs some tidying up.
As it is the Ref tells a lad to go off and a temporary sub comes on. It's up to his manager then how long to leave him on for and there seems to be no time limit which leaves it open to abuse.

Needs tidying indeed.

So, a player could get hurt and bloodied at same time, goes off to get blood sorted. While on sideline, he can't return due to injury, but blood sub stays on.

Can injured/bloody player just slink back to the bench hoping nobody noticed he's all cleaned up, and should be ready to return to play? Does anyone check that he returns immediately? Really then the team get away with using an extra sub?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: AZOffaly on June 22, 2017, 03:20:01 PM
Because the ref initiates a blood sub, rather than the team, there is a loophole that can be exploited alright. But you'd want to be lucky that the ref orders a lad off that you don't mind losing :)

One of the other complications is that the returning player does NOT have to replace the lad that came on for him, and this would only count as one sub.

Example, Player A gets cut, and re calls for a sub, player B.

Player B has a stormer, but they want Player A to come back on. Player A returns for Player C.

So effectively Player A's return negates the blood sub, and Player B actually replaces Player C. It only counts as 1 sub.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Taylor on June 22, 2017, 03:30:40 PM
Season or two ago a Rugby Union team in England gave a sub a blood capsule to get around a blood sub rule (cant mind the team).

Only a matter of time before someone here is caught at it (assuming it is already taking place left, right and centre)
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: AZOffaly on June 22, 2017, 04:18:05 PM
Season or two ago a Rugby Union team in England gave a sub a blood capsule to get around a blood sub rule (cant mind the team).

Only a matter of time before someone here is caught at it (assuming it is already taking place left, right and centre)

That was Harlequins against Leinster in a Heineken Cup Quarter Final. Nick Evans it was. They went so far as to cut him with a razor in the dressing room after to try and head off suspicion.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: BennyCake on June 22, 2017, 04:33:30 PM
Season or two ago a Rugby Union team in England gave a sub a blood capsule to get around a blood sub rule (cant mind the team).

Only a matter of time before someone here is caught at it (assuming it is already taking place left, right and centre)

Tomato ketchup would do the same trick.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Taylor on June 22, 2017, 07:54:46 PM
Season or two ago a Rugby Union team in England gave a sub a blood capsule to get around a blood sub rule (cant mind the team).

Only a matter of time before someone here is caught at it (assuming it is already taking place left, right and centre)

That was Harlequins against Leinster in a Heineken Cup Quarter Final. Nick Evans it was. They went so far as to cut him with a razor in the dressing room after to try and head off suspicion.

That's the one. I have no doubt it is in our games as well. No reason to believe it isn't when we are already up to our neck in diving, drugs etc etc  :-\
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Croí na hÉireann on June 23, 2017, 09:32:00 AM
One that you rarely see is the sideline ball being moved infield.

Pretty sure if the ref is being given cheek he can move the sideline kick onto the pitch playing area if it is more adventageous, just like he can move a normal free closer to goal.

In the Offaly replay there was something similar. After Heslin scored one of the late goals, Tommy McDaniels ran into the goal, retrieved the ball and kicked it straight into the stand. Referee brought the kickout forward the 13m and the keeper took it out of his hands. Fella operating the scoreboard thought the referee was giving a free out due to where and how the kickout was taken and promptly removed the goal from the scoreboard. This led to confusion in the stand and on the various media platforms until it reappeared without notice on the scoreboard 5 minutes later.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: blewuporstuffed on June 23, 2017, 10:25:41 AM
Season or two ago a Rugby Union team in England gave a sub a blood capsule to get around a blood sub rule (cant mind the team).

Only a matter of time before someone here is caught at it (assuming it is already taking place left, right and centre)

That was Harlequins against Leinster in a Heineken Cup Quarter Final. Nick Evans it was. They went so far as to cut him with a razor in the dressing room after to try and head off suspicion.

I witnessed in a Tyrone senior championship game a few years ago, a player go down injured and the physio coming on to treat him, it was pretty obvious he wouldnt be able to continue and the team had already used their subs,so the physio hit him a box in the mouth to draw blood !!

Happened right in front of us,we couldnt believe it ;D ;D ;D.

That's the one. I have no doubt it is in our games as well. No reason to believe it isn't when we are already up to our neck in diving, drugs etc etc  :-\
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: BennyCake on June 23, 2017, 10:59:07 AM
Ah, that's Tyrone for ye!
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: PMG1 on June 23, 2017, 08:21:58 PM
Season or two ago a Rugby Union team in England gave a sub a blood capsule to get around a blood sub rule (cant mind the team).

Only a matter of time before someone here is caught at it (assuming it is already taking place left, right and centre)

That was Harlequins against Leinster in a Heineken Cup Quarter Final. Nick Evans it was. They went so far as to cut him with a razor in the dressing room after to try and head off suspicion.

I witnessed in a Tyrone senior championship game a few years ago, a player go down injured and the physio coming on to treat him, it was pretty obvious he wouldnt be able to continue and the team had already used their subs,so the physio hit him a box in the mouth to draw blood !!

Happened right in front of us,we couldnt believe it ;D ;D ;D.

That's the one. I have no doubt it is in our games as well. No reason to believe it isn't when we are already up to our neck in diving, drugs etc etc  :-\
I remember that incident well,  think there was actually red sauce used, was laughable but they went on to won the game
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: tonto1888 on July 09, 2017, 10:37:48 PM
Going to use roscommons second goal as an example but there's plenty. How many steps can you take? Do refs just ignore it at times?? Or have I missed a rule change?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Main Street on July 30, 2017, 02:40:35 PM
I'm confused (common enough) on the difference between a legal 2 /3 man tackle and an illegal one.
Oft times I see almost exactly the same scenario being played out, a player on the ball receiving slaps/blows from 2 or more players simultaneoulsly, sometimes the foul is given, sometimes not.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: hardstation on July 30, 2017, 02:53:20 PM
I'm confused (common enough) on the difference between a legal 2 /3 man tackle and an illegal one.
Oft times I see almost exactly the same scenario being played out, a player on the ball receiving slaps/blows from 2 or more players simultaneoulsly, sometimes the foul is given, sometimes not.
If the player is fouled, it's a free. If he is not, it's not.
A player may be legally tackled by 15 players simultaneously.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Zulu on July 30, 2017, 02:56:18 PM
You're only allowed play the ball so if any of the three defenders hit Donaghy rather than the ball it was a free, though I know that's not really how it's reffed. Thought it was a free myself.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Main Street on July 30, 2017, 03:38:28 PM
You wouldn't mind (within reason) contact from one tackler in an attempt to get the ball, happens all the time,  but 2/3  players flaying away simulaneoulsy with arms and hands  is a clear foul.  I thought the interpretation was back in the day of the swarm, that there could only be one active while others can swarm around, blocking.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Hardy on August 02, 2017, 01:39:56 PM
There's nothing in the rules (never was, I'm fairly sure) about the number of players who can tackle and I don't remember any interpretation of rules that considered the number of payers involved.

I think it's one of those mythical rules that were imagined into existence by force of erroneous reference, like rolling ball, you can't tackle the goalkeeper, etc.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Esmarelda on August 02, 2017, 02:47:47 PM
Going to use roscommons second goal as an example but there's plenty. How many steps can you take? Do refs just ignore it at times?? Or have I missed a rule change?
No, but  you've missed a full thread on the subject.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: DuffleKing on August 02, 2017, 03:42:54 PM
There's nothing in the rules (never was, I'm fairly sure) about the number of players who can tackle and I don't remember any interpretation of rules that considered the number of payers involved.

I think it's one of those mythical rules that were imagined into existence by force of erroneous reference, like rolling ball, you can't tackle the goalkeeper, etc.

Correcto (2 turns ref!)
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Main Street on August 02, 2017, 08:55:08 PM
"The tackle is a skill by which one or more players may dispossess an opponent or frustrate his objective within the rules of fair play. A tackle is aimed at the ball, not the player. A tackler may use his body to confront the opponent, but deliberate bodily contact such as punching, slapping, arm-holding, pushing, tripping, jersey pulling or a full frontal charge is forbidden."

My point is there is leeway for one player to tackle and make body contact at the same time but when you have 2 and 3 doing it at the same time, flaying arms in unison, then imo that's a foul.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: DuffleKing on August 03, 2017, 10:48:07 AM
"The tackle is a skill by which one or more players may dispossess an opponent or frustrate his objective within the rules of fair play. A tackle is aimed at the ball, not the player. A tackler may use his body to confront the opponent, but deliberate bodily contact such as punching, slapping, arm-holding, pushing, tripping, jersey pulling or a full frontal charge is forbidden."

My point is there is leeway for one player to tackle and make body contact at the same time but when you have 2 and 3 doing it at the same time, flaying arms in unison, then imo that's a foul.

That tackle definition isn't fit for purpose.
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Rossfan on August 03, 2017, 11:21:10 AM
What are "the rules of fair play"?
Title: Re: Gaelic Football - Rules & Regulations discussion/clarification
Post by: Main Street on August 03, 2017, 03:35:34 PM
"The tackle is a skill by which one or more players may dispossess an opponent or frustrate his objective within the rules of fair play. A tackle is aimed at the ball, not the player. A tackler may use his body to confront the opponent, but deliberate bodily contact such as punching, slapping, arm-holding, pushing, tripping, jersey pulling or a full frontal charge is forbidden."

My point is there is leeway for one player to tackle and make body contact at the same time but when you have 2 and 3 doing it at the same time, flaying arms in unison, then imo that's a foul.

That tackle definition isn't fit for purpose.
who said it was fit for purpose, but it's a standard not a gospel.
Slapping, punching, pushing within limits is allowed when you have one tackler doing it, but 2 or 3  slapping, punching, pushing  at the same time? is that fit for purpose?