Author Topic: Concussion in the GAA  (Read 5975 times)

Declan

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2015, 01:26:05 PM »
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He's moved away from the whole rugby area since and I have the notion that he has concerns about the whole pro rugby thing and the damage being done to the first generation of professionals in order to earn a living.

Yep sure didn't BOD basically say they were guinea pigs in terms of the impact it could have  on their futures?

AZOffaly

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #16 on: October 06, 2015, 01:50:49 PM »
Had 3 concussions in my time. I think they ere cumulative too as it appears to be easier to sustain one after having had previous ones. Been through the hilarious not remembering anything, though I can remember not remembering if you know what I mean.

i think there might be something to that. Certainly the concussions I had seemed to be for less serious collisions each time. The first one was a right hopper of the ground, the second was a head to head collision but nothing crazy, and the third was minor.

twohands!!!

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #17 on: October 06, 2015, 02:49:59 PM »
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He's moved away from the whole rugby area since and I have the notion that he has concerns about the whole pro rugby thing and the damage being done to the first generation of professionals in order to earn a living.

Yep sure didn't BOD basically say they were guinea pigs in terms of the impact it could have  on their futures?

Yeah - one thing is that at least with his parents (both doctors) BOD would have some idea of the risks he was taking. However I'd imagine for a lot of the first generation of professionals there was no real idea that they were risking serious long-term health issues.
Anecdotally I'd imagine amongst current OAPs, that those who played a serious amount of GAA are those with the highest number of bone and joint issues - the number of older/retired GAA lads who've had to have their hips done ot have similar issues is only phenomenal I'd say. My dad has issues with his joints and every time I take him to the specialist he seems to meet someone he played with or against. And that was well before the days of strength and conditioning and proper fitness and taking pain-killers to play though the pain. Really wouldnt be surprised if in a generation of two the rugby of nowadays is looked back on like boxing is viewed now.

The fact that BOD's uncle quit the IRB because he felt that the rugby authorities weren't doing enough to deal with the whole concussion issue is a massive red flag for me about rugby's attitude to the issue. A lot of the folk who seemed to be grand with the current status quo in rugby are those who have an awful lot invested in there not being any problems. Seems to be a fair bit of crossing the fingers and hoping for the best, which really isn't what you want with an issue of this nature.

Dinny Breen

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #18 on: October 06, 2015, 03:11:23 PM »
I still coach rugby and the guidelines are simple if you suspect a player has a concussion you remove him straight away, it's now built into the laws that if the referee suspects concussion he can remove the player.

Pretty much like helmets in hurling, mouth guards in rugby and GAA once consequences are known it makes it a lot easier to change the culture and common sense prevails. You will also have noticed in the WC that foul play around high tackles, shoulder hits towards the neck and head and head grabs in mauls are been picked up and punished immediately or citings are occurring.

The amateur game will be fine, the professional game though is results driven and if anyone saw Any Give Sunday and Laurance Taylor's character that's where professional rugby is heading, coaches want their best players on the pitch, players want to be on the pitch and medical teams will make that happen. As Paul Kimmage has highlighted Professional Rugby is about pain management and reducing recovery times. To become a Professional athlete in any sport you have a will to succeed and to be a winner, most athletes will do almost anything to be out on a pitch/track competing at the highest level. How do you change that culture?
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AZOffaly

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #19 on: October 06, 2015, 03:34:32 PM »
True Dinny. Actually I was very impressed in Thomond Park on Friday night. Don't know if you saw it on TV, but Felix Jones got tackled coming out side the Munster 22, and he got absolutely blasted. His head flew back and when he got off the ground he just didn't look right. He wasn't all over the place, or wobbly or anything, but he looked a bit 'off'.

I said it to the brother in law, and no sooner had I the words said than Dr. O'Sullivan was out, talking to him and he basically dragged him off the pitch and down the tunnel for concussion protocols. He never appeared for the second half, so Dr. O'Sullivan was obviously right. Felix was, as you mention, adamant he was staying on, and he wasn't happy when he was brought off, but I thought it was fantastic out of the Munster medical team.

Dinny Breen

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #20 on: October 06, 2015, 03:51:39 PM »
True Dinny. Actually I was very impressed in Thomond Park on Friday night. Don't know if you saw it on TV, but Felix Jones got tackled coming out side the Munster 22, and he got absolutely blasted. His head flew back and when he got off the ground he just didn't look right. He wasn't all over the place, or wobbly or anything, but he looked a bit 'off'.

I said it to the brother in law, and no sooner had I the words said than Dr. O'Sullivan was out, talking to him and he basically dragged him off the pitch and down the tunnel for concussion protocols. He never appeared for the second half, so Dr. O'Sullivan was obviously right. Felix was, as you mention, adamant he was staying on, and he wasn't happy when he was brought off, but I thought it was fantastic out of the Munster medical team.

No I didn't see that but that's brilliant to hear, players really can be their own worst enemies.
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winghalfun

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #21 on: October 06, 2015, 05:47:33 PM »
Was there not a motion at congress this year to deal with this issue?

How far did it get?

5 Sams

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #22 on: October 06, 2015, 07:28:46 PM »
I got a junior B concussion. As you can imagine, it was handled with the greatest medical attention.

That morning I banged my head on the window sill while painting.

Drove from Belfast to Newry to play the Mitchels, and soon afterwards lined out in my usual 13 jersey (it was either 13 or 23 for me). Scored a point early enough, then couldn't get into the game at all - but as we had no subs I knew I would still be clear to rack up a bit of black type behind my name in the second half.

Shortly after half time, based on what people told me (I've no recollection), a ball went into the corridor of uncertainty, and I elected to try to head it into the net, and in doing so I shipped a heavy knock on the head. Lay down for 30 seconds, then got up and at it. Allegedly I played a blinder for 10 minutes or so, when I decided to take myself out to midfield and drive the team forward (I still don't believe that bit). Then I lay down in the midfield area and decided to go for a wee sleep. The reserve management duo (including 5 Sams), got me revived enough to drag me over to the side of the field, where I lay down and came in and out of silly talk and sleep for 10 minutes.

I do remember the final whistle going. I'll never forget that sound, for it also seemed to put me back into sound mind.

Except, I'd no memory of anything that happened that day. Didn't remember playing football, didn't remember coming from Belfast. My hands were covered in a yellow paint, and I'd absolutely no recollection of painting the house that morning. It took one of the players who I'd been chatting to before the game, to put that piece of the jigsaw together. And over the course of the next few hours, more of the lights started to come on.

Weird shit. Wouldn't recommend it to anyone.

Ha ha. Love it. Junior B concussion.  ;D ;D Remember it well. We just thought you were still pissed from the night before!
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Declan

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #23 on: October 06, 2015, 09:26:10 PM »
AZ /Dinny  - I thought the last sentence of the programme the other night was telling  when Conor O'Shea posed the hypothetical question re Paulie getting a knock in the head on the Tuesday before a WC final and would he play. I must admit listening to Dr McLaughlin from the IRFU on the programme I would 't have huge confidence in the right decision being made

ONeill

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #24 on: October 06, 2015, 10:24:33 PM »
St Gall's had three players concussed during their All-Ireland final win. Was talking to one who said it was like playing in black and white.

Was also talking to a doctor who said the concussed player can easily play the next 20 mins or so as if they're ok - just going through the motions without actually doing anything with the ball.
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snoopdog

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #25 on: October 06, 2015, 11:00:58 PM »
AZ /Dinny  - I thought the last sentence of the programme the other night was telling  when Conor O'Shea posed the hypothetical question re Paulie getting a knock in the head on the Tuesday before a WC final and would he play. I must admit listening to Dr McLaughlin from the IRFU on the programme I would 't have huge confidence in the right decision being made

I agree,  no disrespect to the man but he sounded like a yes man.

BenDover

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #26 on: October 07, 2015, 08:22:54 AM »
I got this email re an ELEARNING CONCUSSION AWARENESS COURSE.

The above course is available to complete at learning.gaa.ie

When you enter the GAA Learning and Development portal you will need to register onto the system. This will take around 2 minutes and will require you to forward enter an email address and a password.

You will only have to do this once. Every time you revisit the site you will be asked to input your email and password.

Once registered click into the section Coach Education. (on your left hand side)

Then click into Ulster.

Then click into Armagh.

Then click Armagh Elearning Courses.

Then click the course which is named Armagh Concussion.

Hound

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #27 on: October 07, 2015, 09:15:18 AM »
Here's a clip of the All Ireland final from 2013

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hC7Wa1slbiU

Go to 4.30, and check out Ger Brennan's late point for Dublin.
As the ball is going over the bar, watch the Dublin player who runs into the Mayo box. He'd got a good bang to the head earlier and I don't think he'd any clue where he was at that stage!

AZOffaly

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #28 on: October 07, 2015, 09:49:00 AM »
Alan Brogan against Mayo seemed to get an awful bang as well, and it seemed to slip under the radar and I think he played the replay.

Declan

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Re: Concussion in the GAA
« Reply #29 on: October 07, 2015, 01:13:09 PM »

Rory O'Carroll has called for a change in attitudes towards head injuries.

The Dublin full back famously played on with concussion in the 2013 All-Ireland final against Mayo but he accepts that this was a mistake.

Speaking at the launch of Acquired Brain Injury Ireland's new smartphone app, Concussion Smart, O'Carroll said: "I suppose it was because it was the All-Ireland final and we had no substitutes left. I was recognised as concussion.
 "It is about changing the culture. I was so determined to convince the doctor that I was okay, and the referee.

"The GAA and the rugby as well are seen as the bastion of masculinity within Ireland. When you play with a head injury and if you are bleeding and have a bandage wrapped around your head, you are seen as more of a man.

"The concussion or the blood injury are seen as a badge of honour. It's about kind of changing that culture, a shift, to use your head in these decisions. It isn't a badge of honour; it's a medical issue which could affect your life into the future."