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Messages - seafoid

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1
General discussion / Re: Brexit.
« on: Today at 10:31:11 AM »
I'd say your knowledge of "The South" is fairly limited.
That actually cuts both ways many from the south do not understand nationalists in the North, or their motivations. They criticise without the benefit of the experience many nationalists had of the state in which they grew up. Prime example are those FF Republicans sniping at SF for not swearing an oath to the Queen, they don't get that people voted SF on that basis. I would not swear an oath to the Queen why would I expect my MP to do so? There are other examples as well.
Mark Durkan never swore an oath of allegiance to the Queen
SF defences of abstentionism are bollocks

2
General discussion / Re: The Super(ish) Leeds United Thread
« on: Today at 08:54:55 AM »
https://www.theguardian.com/football/2019/jan/16/marcelo-bielsa-leeds-spied-every-opponent

Marcelo Bielsa admits Leeds have spied on every opponent this season
• Manager says it is not illegal but not necessarily right
• Bielsa insists he had no bad intentions or wish to cheat

Louise Taylor
Wed 16 Jan 2019 17.41 GMT Last modified on Thu 17 Jan 2019 00.30 GMT

 
 Marcelo Bielsa explains in his press conference his tactical analysis of opponents this season. Photograph: Mark Walker/PA
Marcelo Bielsa has admitted Leeds United have spied on all their opponents this season but remains adamant no specific rules were broken and believes he is guilty of stupidity rather than cheating.
“I observed all the rivals we played against and watched the training sessions of all opponents,” said the Leeds manager in the course of an extraordinary, unscheduled, press conference cum coaching masterclass at the club’s training headquarters near Wetherby.
Leeds’ spying should be treated as a form of entertainment, not cheating | Paul Wilson
Read more
“So why did I send someone to watch them? Just because I thought I wasn’t violating the norm. All the information I need to clarify [my tactics] I gather without watching the training session of the opponent … but we feel guilty if we don’t work enough. Watching it [the opponents training] allows us to have less anxiety and, in my case, I am stupid enough to allow this kind of behaviour.”
Perhaps the most remarkable thing about Elland Road’s “Spygate” furore is that Bielsa’s Championship leaders have been able to deploy such clandestine tactics undetected for more than half a season.
The former Argentina and Chile manager was finally prompted to address the issue last Friday when, shortly before Leeds beat Frank Lampard’s Derby County 2-0 in West Yorkshire, the Midlands club revealed that police had apprehended a suspicious person outside their training ground on Thursday. Bielsa immediately acknowledged he was a member of his backroom staff.
Although the man was released without charge, it transpired he had been equipped with pliers, binoculars and disguised clothing. “Cheating is a big word but this is over the line,” said Lampard, who revealed that, before Derby lost 4-1 to Leeds earlier in the season a man was spotted lurking in the bushes outside his training ground. “I’d rather not coach than send people undercover on their hands and knees in the undergrowth,” added the former England midfielder.
The Football League and Football Association responded by launching investigations but, given that there are no precise rules governing footballing espionage, it is difficult to see exactly what punishment they can impose on Leeds and Bielsa without stepping into a legal minefield. Even so, the EFL has asked Elland Road executives for their observations and, once a response is received, will decide if there has been a contravention of the League’s charter and whether to issue charges against Leeds and/or their manager.

 

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Marcelo Bielsa said: ‘I observed all the rivals we played against. We watched all the training sessions before we played them.’ Photograph: Paul Childs/Action Images
If any charges are proven, the League – liasing closely with the FA – believe the “full range of sanctions” could potentially be applied. These range from a slap on the wrist to expulsion from the league, although no one is suggesting that the latter scenario - or a points deduction – are likely.
Nonetheless Leeds made a point of issuing a swift, formal, apology to Derby on Saturday and Bielsa has evidently deemed it politic to adopt a conciliatory tone while opting for total honesty.
“I’m going to make it easier for the EFL investigation,” said the 63-year-old Argentinian, speaking via a translator. “My behaviour is observed from the most extreme position. By doing this I respect the possible sanctions by the authorities.”
Significantly he declined to use the precedent of past incidents of football managers spying on opponents – a practice that, as recently as Friday, he maintained is the norm across South America – as a defence and appeared to accept that a certain moral ambiguity underpinned such subterfuge. “I don’t want to make it easier for me by attacking others,” he said.
“Regarding what I’ve done it is not illegal. It’s not specified, described or restrained. It’s not seen as a good thing but it is not a violation of the law. Although not illegal it’s not necessarily the right thing to do. But the wrong things you do are not done with bad intention or an intention to cheat.
In the course of the media briefing, Bielsa also treated assembled journalists to a PowerPoint presentation designed to detail how much preparation and analysis he and his staff devote to each opponent - before spies are deployed and their reports compiled.
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Regardless of information received from undercover operatives, the Leeds manager spends countless hours analysing opponent’s previous matches. Citing Derby as an example, he revealed his research on the exact number of times Lampard had utilised particular formations, which players he had deployed in different positions and the identification of opposing formations they had struggled against.
If the underlying message was that Bielsa’s meticulous attention to the small print would almost certainly have helped transport Leeds to the top of the table without any spying, it
More pertinent though is the question of how lawyers will interpret his actions in relation to EFL Regulation 3.4 which states: “In all matters and transactions relating to the league each club shall behave towards each other club and the league with the utmost good faith.”
Then there is the similarly rather woolly EFL Regulation 21 which states that managers must not bring the League or any club into “disrepute.”
It seems Bielsa’s answer attributed what had happened to cultural misunderstanding. “If you observe something without authorisation we call it spying,” he said. “I’m going to try and explain I did not have bad intentions. I did not try to get an unfair sporting advantage but I did it because it was not illegal or violating specific laws. But I have to adapt to the habits of English football.”Lampard later admitted he had yet to see Bielsa’s explanation. “It’s a funny one for me because I don’t really want to speak too much,” he said after Derby’s win over Southampton. “I’ve said quite a lot at the weekend. It is what it is now. We all know what’s been happening across the board. It’s a league issue now. It’s our league, it’s every team. So it’s up to them to decide what goes from now.”

3
General discussion / Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« on: Today at 06:57:53 AM »
An extreme court is a bad thing....whether its extreme left or extreme right

From what I have seen each side paints the others as extremists even when theyre not

FFS if you listened to Democrats in MA, Charlie Baker is an extremist

http://newtondems.org/dems/2017/9/29/charlie-baker-dont-believe-the-hype

You are a gobshite, Whitey

Trump is a project to pauperise people like you.
You bought it

“Trump is good at lying, and creating crisis and spectacle—exactly the qualities for the perfect leader of a Russian United States.
https://mobile.twitter.com/Teri_Kanefield/status/1037730182294061057

https://mobile.twitter.com/Teri_Kanefield/status/1042073352695734272

https://youtu.be/ZJe4NlOjAJo


Teri Kanefield

@Teri_Kanefield
·
Sep 18



15/ Most of this info was available, but the 2016 election coverage was dominated by Her Emails.

Why? Because Americans weren't prepared for Russian style propaganda & disinformation.

And because spreading simple lies is easier than understanding—& talking about—complex crimes.

4
General discussion / Re: Brexit.
« on: January 16, 2019, 02:52:08 PM »
Our Sammy doing what Sammy does best;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SR7JwVjWByM&feature=youtu.be

48 minutes in.

😂 Sammy put in his box as usual, what a clown

Not a clue does he have. The more he is on the TV with educated real politicians the better as it shows him up for what he really is. A bluffer.
Sammy is a clown
So is Arlene

Ian Gow said 30 years ago that Unionist leaders were useless.
They are even worse now

5
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/central-council-must-take-their-chance-to-change-the-game-1.3759248

"That the handpass proposal has been advanced reflects the deep unease within the game that kicking the ball has become a skill, the practice of which is in accelerated decline. This concern was also expressed by the report of the 2012 Football Review Committee report but it was decided that as hand-passing had shown signs of abating no moves would be made to curb the practice.
That ‘trend’ proved illusory, as can be seen by combining the statistical findings of the FRC and the current Standing Committee on the Playing Rules.
In the 1970s the ratio of hand-pass to kicked pass was 1.1:1. By 2000, this had risen to 1.8:1. Ten years later, it was 2.3:1. The recent SCPR recommendations reported the 2018 figure as 3.4:1.

Time to act

If the GAA wants to do something about this it is clearly time to act. There are those who say that there is nothing wrong with football but the transition to a possession-based game makes it less exciting on the simple objective grounds that the ball is in contest for a far smaller amount of time.
That is the basis of the most damning comparison with hurling where possession is contested several times a minute.
Given the strength of feeling on the quality of football at present, which is a factor, along with others, such as competitive imbalance, in its waning popularity – evident in both match attendances and television audiences – a review was bound to take place."

This could explain at lot


Down would be  operating at a ratio of 1.6 : 1 which was the 1994 level
Meath would be operating at 1.8 :1 or the 2001 level
Tyrone and Kerry  must be at 2.3 :1 or the 2010 level



6
GAA Discussion / Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
« on: January 16, 2019, 11:27:34 AM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/central-council-must-take-their-chance-to-change-the-game-1.3759248

That the handpass proposal has been advanced reflects the deep unease within the game that kicking the ball has become a skill, the practice of which is in accelerated decline. This concern was also expressed by the report of the 2012 Football Review Committee report but it was decided that as hand-passing had shown signs of abating no moves would be made to curb the practice.
That ‘trend’ proved illusory, as can be seen by combining the statistical findings of the FRC and the current Standing Committee on the Playing Rules.
In the 1970s the ratio of hand-pass to kicked pass was 1.1:1. By 2000, this had risen to 1.8:1. Ten years later, it was 2.3:1. The recent SCPR recommendations reported the 2018 figure as 3.4:1.

Time to act

If the GAA wants to do something about this it is clearly time to act. There are those who say that there is nothing wrong with football but the transition to a possession-based game makes it less exciting on the simple objective grounds that the ball is in contest for a far smaller amount of time.
That is the basis of the most damning comparison with hurling where possession is contested several times a minute.
Given the strength of feeling on the quality of football at present, which is a factor, along with others, such as competitive imbalance, in its waning popularity – evident in both match attendances and television audiences – a review was bound to take place.

7
General discussion / Re: Brexit.
« on: January 16, 2019, 11:12:11 AM »


EU ready to discuss new Brexit deal if UK changes ‘red lines’

Michel Barnier says there is ‘no room for manoeuvre’ when it comes to backstop


The European Union’s chief Brexit negotiator has told the United Kingdom that it could have a different kind of departure deal if London is willing to change its key demands.

Addressing the European Parliament on Wednesday, Michel Barnier defended the withdrawal agreement struck with Theresa May which suffered a crushing defeat in a House of Commons’ vote on Tuesday evening and left theprime minister facing a confidence vote.

Mr Barnier warned that the risk of a disorderly withdrawal was now greater than ever as a result of the vote and that the EU would step up its preparations amid concern a no-deal outcome could disrupt the whole of Europe.

He indicated that one way forward would be for Britain to accept even closer alignment with EU regulations to secure a very close trading relationship in future. EU officials say London could, for example, abandon its determination to leave the EU customs union and the centrally regulated single market.

Referring to statements by the European Parliament and all the other member states, Mr Barnier said: “If the United Kingdom chooses to let its red lines change in future, and that it takes this choice for its advantage of the ambition of going beyond a simple but not negligible free trade accord, then the European Union would be ready immediately to ... respond favourably.”

That suggestion for a “deeper relationship” was echoed by the EU parliament’s Brexit coordinator, Guy Verhofstadt.

 
Exposed divisions

Mr Barnier and others lined up to highlight how the vote in London exposed only divisions, without shedding light on what Britain’s could actually rally behind as a consensual position, just 10 weeks before it is set to leave the bloc, potentially into a legal limbo for citizens and businesses.

“Please, please, please tell us finally what you want to achieve,” pleaded Manfred Weber, the centre-right leader in the parliament and an ally of German chancellor Angela Merkel.


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But, he added, there was “no room for manoeuvre” in terms of renegotiating the current agreement, which Brexit campaigners say leaves Britain too tied to EU rules, especially due to a “backstop” insurance clause intended to avoid throwing up a hard customs border across Ireland.

The DUP Brexit spokesman Sammy Wilson on Wednesday doubled down on his party leader’s claimthat there had “never” been a hard border in Ireland, meaning the backstop was unnecessary.

Mr Barnier insisted there could be no weakening on that issue.

“Right now it’s too early to assess all the consequences of this vote,” he told a Strasbourg chamber that was sparsely attended for the early morning debate, perhaps reflecting a growing weariness in Europe with Britain’s troubles.

“We have respected and we continue to respect the democratic parliamentary debate in the UK and I will not speculate on the different scenarios. What yesterday’s vote showed is that the political conditions for the ratification of the withdrawal agreement are not yet there in London.”

Second referendum

Some EU politicians have called for Britain to put the question of remaining in the EU to a second referendum. The chair of EU summits, Donald Tusk, suggested on Tuesday that division in Britain could lead to Brexit being cancelled.

Frans Timmermans, the deputy head of the European Commission, citing a phrase often attributed to British fantasy novelist C.S. Lewis, suggested Britain should put its past tribulations behind it and seek a fresh start with the EU:

“You can’t go back and change the beginning,” the former Dutch foreign minister said, “But you can start where you are and change the ending.”

But Nigel Farage, the former leader of the UK Independence Party which drove the campaign for the 2016 vote to leave, told fellow members of the European Parliament that any second ballot would deliver an even greater majority for quitting because Britons had been angered by the EU’s stance in negotiations.

8
General discussion / Re: Brexit.
« on: January 16, 2019, 11:06:34 AM »
May hasn’t been inept.

She has never, never has a hand to play here. Her country wish to leave. What interest would the EU have in smoothing this over, and handing out sweeteners?

What a second referendum would allow the UK to do is decide whether it’s worth continuing with the process, now we are all better informed.
Her red lines were stupid
The aim of the game was to execute Brexit without breaking up the party and she was a poor leader
She is no Geezer (2002 vintage)

9
General discussion / Re: Brexit.
« on: January 16, 2019, 08:47:14 AM »


FT

May’s defeat spells trouble for the EU’s Brexit approach

Brussels sees outcome as a reality check on timing, renegotiation and Irish backstop
 
Donald Tusk, left, EU Council president, is said to have taken a more hardline position on Brexit than Jean-
Alex Barker in Brussels
yesterday
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The House of Commons vote against Theresa May’s Brexit deal is not just a historic blow for the British prime minister; it is also a moment of reckoning for the longstanding EU strategy on the UK’s exit from the bloc.
Since Britain’s referendum vote in 2016, the EU has largely acted as if there were no fundamental choice between arranging the UK’s orderly exit and maintaining the unity and integrity of the European project. The onus was on Britain to yield.
The sheer scale of the defeat of the draft Brexit deal — a 585-page doorstopper treaty painstakingly negotiated over 18 months— throws that approach into doubt, forcing both sides to revisit their ideas of what is politically feasible in the coming months.
Hosuk Lee-Makiyama, a former EU trade official now heading the European Centre for International Political Economy, said the draft deal was a Pyrrhic victory for the bloc. EU negotiators secured highly favourable terms from Britain but “risk losing because it cannot be ratified”, he said. “The ball is definitely in the EU court.”
Brussels will insist London take the initiative in the aftermath of the vote. But senior EU officials at the heart of the negotiation see the result as a reality check on three fronts: Britain’s scheduled March 29 exit date; the durability of a draft agreement previously billed as a “best and last” offer; and the question of how to manage the impact of a no-deal Brexit on the Northern Ireland border, the most contentious topic.
Recommended

 

Instant Insight Robert Shrimsley
May’s loss points to a Brexit delay
With so much up in the air, a minority in Brussels is now asking whether the EU’s focus should now be more focused on avoiding Brexit altogether.
The initial response
While nerves over Brexit have grown in some European capitals, the response will depend on how Mrs May fares after the vote. Jean-Claude Juncker, the commission president, tweeted of his “regret” at the defeat. “I urge the UK to clarify its intentions as soon as possible,” he said. “Time is almost up.”
The bloc is expected to accelerate no-deal preparations, but Donald Tusk, the European Council president, and many member states are reluctant to call a special summit on Brexit before “the dust has settled” in Westminster, according to one senior diplomat.
Rather than gamble on a summit with “nothing to discuss”, the EU side wants negotiations to develop so that any British demands for revisions are both clear and plausible. “The worst thing for everyone will be a European Council that slides into disagreement and more chaos,” said a second EU diplomat.
The Brexit timeline
Hardly a diplomat is left working on Brexit who believes March 29 will be Britain’s departure day. A significant shift occurred over the Christmas break, as Martin Selmayr, the commission’s top civil servant, began exploring legal avenues to prolong the process, according to senior EU officials.
This is partly because Mrs May’s negotiators privately made clear that if her government’s attempts to win a “meaningful vote” on her deal ran into the new year, Britain would be unable to pass all the ratification legislation required before the end of March. Even in a no-deal scenario, both sides expect to extend the date to allow for preparations.
The open question is not if but when Britain asks for an extension. If Mrs May retains the authority to pursue a second vote on her deal in coming weeks — after seeking relatively minor revisions — she may not want to ease the pressure of an impending deadline.
By contrast, a request for a more fundamental renegotiation — or indeed time for a second referendum or an election — would need to be accompanied by a UK request for an extension.
Views have recently shifted within the EU on how to respond. On Tuesday night French President Emmanuel Macron suggested that the UK would ultimately need to take more time. EU leaders are likely to approve an extension until July 1, even if it is primarily to cope with political gridlock in Britain. “If she asks for one she gets one,” said a senior EU official involved in Brexit. “That is what has changed.” Some political conditions are likely to be attached.
One camp of EU officials see merit in a longer extension, potentially going on to the end of the year, to give Britain time “for the fever to break”. But this runs up against a big political obstacle: the need for Britain to elect MEPs to the new European Parliament before its first session in July. Lawyers have been asked to look for workarounds, but no bulletproof answers have been found.
The renegotiation
Negotiators had seen the “most dangerous” outcome for the EU as being a narrow defeat for Mrs May in the Commons vote, which would have given the UK prime minister leverage to seek surgical but significant changes to the withdrawal treaty.
Her devastating loss in Westminster suggests much broader changes may be needed to secure parliament’s approval.
The most obvious “surgical” change would, in effect, set an end-date to the backstop plan to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland. The backstop is loathed by Brexiters, who see it as a “trap” that could keep the UK in a customs union with the EU for years.
Some member states have no qualms with the concept of time-limiting the backstop. But they want any compromise to emerge from Ireland; there remains no desire to publicly overrule Leo Varadkar, the Irish premier.
Mr Varadkar has made clear to Berlin and Paris that he would prefer a no-deal to a time-limited backstop, according to people familiar with the conversations. “He can blame the Brits for the mess,” said one.


10
General discussion / Re: Brexit.
« on: January 16, 2019, 08:03:29 AM »
She'll win the no confidence motion, rightly so too. Corbyn would make an even bigger mess of things and everyone beyond some of his sycophantic inner circle know it.

In fairness, they probably know it too and just pretend otherwise.
Voting against her yesterday and for her today is incoherent
The Eurosceptics want a weak PM but other Tories do not

11
General discussion / Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« on: January 16, 2019, 08:02:05 AM »
The US was always cowboys vs Indians
Now the Indians are called Latinos.

And the cowboys are losing

https://youtu.be/0UVUW11FENs

Sure isn’t it the same in NI?  Protestants losing their demographic grip .

12
General discussion / Re: Brexit.
« on: January 16, 2019, 07:57:32 AM »
Pushing back the date requires all 27 to support.

Withdrawing 50 is unilateral by the UK only
If the Brits appear to be be making genuine progress towards something coherent in the reality spectrum I think Article 50 could be extended. Apparently the EU are thinking of waiting until the hurling round robin is over to decide on Brexit

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/jan/13/eu-preparing-to-delay-brexit-until-at-least-july

Brexit so far has  been operating in the fantasy spectrum


13
General discussion / Re: Brexit.
« on: January 15, 2019, 05:25:23 PM »
If there was no backstop clause inserted in the Withdrawal Agreement, does anyone think that would make the difference to the agreement being voted through by a majority in parliament?
No

They still don't know what they want

https://brexitoptions.co.uk/diagram.html

14
Hurling Discussion / Re: The home of hurling
« on: January 15, 2019, 03:13:17 PM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/hurling/liam-sheedy-tipperary-are-little-bit-behind-physically-1.3742325

Returning Tipperary hurling manager Liam Sheedy believes his squad have fallen behind in the physical stakes, but he thinks they need an all-round improvement in their standards to be competitive in 2019.

Back at the helm for the first time since 2010, Sheedy will hope to bring Tipp back into the All-Ireland final for the first time since they defeated Kilkenny in the 2016 decider, but after watching on as a supporter in 2018 he thinks there is definite room for improvement.

“We feel physically we are little bit behind some of the other teams in terms of our conditioning so we’ve a few tough weeks and months ahead of us,” said Sheedy.

“One thing I would say, and I know it’s early days, but these boys certainly seem up for work and they can look forward to the new year and the National League. Before you know it you’ll be in the beginning of May and it’ll be charged championship time, so we have plenty of work to do in the mean time.

“It’s about building in every position. I’d be happy that in Tipperary we are a proud hurling county and we are looking to really prepare to the best of our ability. Whatever that takes us it will take us but I do think I am happy with the panel that has been assembled.

15
General discussion / Re: Brexit.
« on: January 15, 2019, 03:09:52 PM »
Crispin Odey's comments (made last week) are the reason sterling jumped last week.
The DUP have lost. The consequences for NI are massive.
Arlene bet the farm on no deal.

Seafoid, you're an awful man for the big dramatic statement.

Nobody's lost or won anything with this yet.

No deal is not going to happen, Franko
You can bet Ballymena on it
Parliament won't accept it and neither will the EU

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