Author Topic: TG4 - Club Championships Coverage  (Read 383365 times)

Milltown Row2

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Re: Cluichí
« Reply #2295 on: November 14, 2022, 01:03:16 PM »
Dia Domhnaigh   20 - 11 - 2022

Ballyea v Saint Finbarrs   beo
1-15pm

Na Piarsaigh v Ballygunner    beo
3-15pm


That's more like it...

Beers from 1.30 onwards !!

I may get the 'duties' done before that, I won't be leaving the sofa
None of us are getting out of here alive, so please stop treating yourself like an after thought. Ea

Armagh18

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Re: TG4 - Club Championships Coverage
« Reply #2296 on: November 14, 2022, 01:09:11 PM »
What way is the draw in the football this year

Ulster winners v Connacht winners ?


Aye, as far as I know it's Ulster v Connacht at all three grades. Believe it's Ulster v the Galway champions in the senior hurling as well.
Moyullen the likely Connacht winners? Meant to be a good side.

imtommygunn

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Re: Cluichí
« Reply #2297 on: November 14, 2022, 02:58:05 PM »
Dia Domhnaigh   20 - 11 - 2022

Ballyea v Saint Finbarrs   beo
1-15pm

Na Piarsaigh v Ballygunner    beo
3-15pm


That's more like it...

Beers from 1.30 onwards !!

I may get the 'duties' done before that, I won't be leaving the sofa

That second game should be a belter. I think the AI champions, as good as they are, are going out.

drici

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Cluichí
« Reply #2298 on: November 20, 2022, 09:32:25 PM »
Dia Domhnaigh   27 - 11 - 2022

Cargin Erin's Own v Glen Watty Grahams   beo
1-30pm

Kilmacud Crokes v Naomh Moling    beo
3-15pm

Too many steps

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Re: TG4 - Club Championships Coverage
« Reply #2299 on: November 22, 2022, 06:21:20 PM »
Just done a speed check on my Starlink connection; 167 mbps d/l and 23 u/l
I haven't seen any issues with speeds shrinking.

Uplink is the key speed barometer here - 23Mb/s is good for feeding 1080p to the streaming server, but little room to go any better. In my experience it's no better than EE 4G in most cases in d'north

Reports concerning shrinking speeds have come from here based on tests done with Ookla - but of course individual experiences can vary.

The likes of Starlink and other potential LEO satellite services (e.g. OneWeb) definitely have a place in areas where it is unlikely FTTP or a fast enough wireless terrestrial network (mobile or FWA) will likely reach, but while LEO satellite internet removes some of the bottlenecks that are inherent in Geostationary satellite internet, there's still a ceiling in the potential available - it's fine for now for most current customers, but as/if more customers come on stream, either more satellites are required (and there is realistically a finite number here - there's enough junk metal orbiting earth as it is!) and/or the available bandwidth has to be spread among more users. There's nothing unusual about this - as newer internet service technologies have come on over the years, new adopters often get great speeds for the technology of the time, but they get gradually slower as more users get on board with it, happened with ADSL, FTTC/VDSL2, 4G LTE and its starting to happen with 5G NR too. Even happened in the 80's & 90's with dial-up connections.

23Mbps is loads for 1080p - enough for 4k with modern encoders.

HEVC encoders on the market specced at 20Mbps max BW for 4k.

Professional broadcasters using HEVC at 6Mbps for news feeds and live with bonded sim and Satellite broadband at 1080i these days - might want to push it for sport content to 8Mbps with the extra motion.

Fionntamhnach

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Re: TG4 - Club Championships Coverage
« Reply #2300 on: November 23, 2022, 07:36:23 PM »
Just done a speed check on my Starlink connection; 167 mbps d/l and 23 u/l
I haven't seen any issues with speeds shrinking.

Uplink is the key speed barometer here - 23Mb/s is good for feeding 1080p to the streaming server, but little room to go any better. In my experience it's no better than EE 4G in most cases in d'north

Reports concerning shrinking speeds have come from here based on tests done with Ookla - but of course individual experiences can vary.

The likes of Starlink and other potential LEO satellite services (e.g. OneWeb) definitely have a place in areas where it is unlikely FTTP or a fast enough wireless terrestrial network (mobile or FWA) will likely reach, but while LEO satellite internet removes some of the bottlenecks that are inherent in Geostationary satellite internet, there's still a ceiling in the potential available - it's fine for now for most current customers, but as/if more customers come on stream, either more satellites are required (and there is realistically a finite number here - there's enough junk metal orbiting earth as it is!) and/or the available bandwidth has to be spread among more users. There's nothing unusual about this - as newer internet service technologies have come on over the years, new adopters often get great speeds for the technology of the time, but they get gradually slower as more users get on board with it, happened with ADSL, FTTC/VDSL2, 4G LTE and its starting to happen with 5G NR too. Even happened in the 80's & 90's with dial-up connections.

23Mbps is loads for 1080p - enough for 4k with modern encoders.

HEVC encoders on the market specced at 20Mbps max BW for 4k.

Professional broadcasters using HEVC at 6Mbps for news feeds and live with bonded sim and Satellite broadband at 1080i these days - might want to push it for sport content to 8Mbps with the extra motion.

You could certainly try running 4K video with HEVC at an 8Mb/s lossy bitrate as an uplink to a CDN server to TV studio, but the end results to the viewer will likely be sub-optimal. This is because even if that original stream looked fine, it will have been recompressed at least once by a further encoding to the end viewer (either via broadcast or IP delivery) as well as possible production use.

For linking purposes where only a lossy compression for video is practical (e.g. satellite, 4G or 5G mobile), consideration for what is intended to being filmed is required - if it's an OB only featuring interviewees there is little movement in pictures & most movements are generally predictable which isn't demanding on live encoding. However where there is lots of moving objects, where the camera is often moving and where there is quite a bit of detail in the images - like a lot of field sports - to prevent artifacting (before the picture even reaches the studio) the video encoders need a lot more elbow room to allow more frame difference pixels to be properly encoded for the same objective video quality compared to a couple of talking heads against a static background.

It's been a while since I was viewing satellite feeds, but I do recall that the live feeds for TG4's GAA Beo's OB broadcasts that were on Astra 3B at 23.5 East had their MPEG4  1080i video encoded at around 16-18 Mb/s alongside their main audio commentary track and a "no commentator" track that gave a crowd-only sound presumably so that footage could be reused without commentators as Gaelige on news reports and/or have dubbed commentary after the event. As these are live broadcasts and the feeds are SCPC, the video will be at a (mostly) fixed bitrates and in setting up will want to keep as much headspace as possible for when the encoders need to work their hardest.

Satellite use for non-critical OB use has markedly dropped in recent years, especially if the feed to the studio isn't live - if some amount of editing is done at the OB location then this can be pre-compressed using adjustable bitrates that usually is set of a perceived quality marker before being sent over an IP delivery system, be that mobile, LEO or geostationary satellies, landline xDSL or optical fibre links etc. which in essence isn't much different to uploading a video on YouTube. I've not a lot of experience myself of satellite broadband, but I'd imagine that since contention rates can be very variable and that it has only limited control over, it likely has issues with bursts & clogs of bandwidth both on downlink and uplink speeds similar to that with mobile internet, where doing a speed test can often see speeds vary wildly during the testing period due to what other users are themselves doing connected at either a specific cell site, or at another cell site that provides the bandwidth to a neigbhouring cell (usually a microwave link).

For what it's worth, as far as I'm aware there are no primary satellite based links to broadcasters covering the current soccer World Cup - instead, all of them are being delivered via private optical fibre connections to broadcasters. There are some satellite links in place (most of them encrypted) as a backup but I don't think anything's been required to need them so far.
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drici

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Cluiche
« Reply #2301 on: November 27, 2022, 12:59:51 AM »
Dia Sathairn   03 - 12 - 2022

Ballygunner v Ballyea    beo
3-15pm

bannside

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Re: TG4 - Club Championships Coverage
« Reply #2302 on: November 27, 2022, 07:22:10 AM »
That's definitely a candidate for post of the year Fionntamhnach!

drici

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Cluichí
« Reply #2303 on: November 27, 2022, 10:19:51 PM »
Dia Domhnaigh   04 - 12 - 2022

Moycullen v Tourlestrane   beo
12-45pm

"Kilmacrud Crokes" v Na Dúnta   beo
2-30pm

"Kilmacrud Crokes" v Ballyhale Shamrocks   beo
4-30pm

Maybe - Programme will also include an analysis of what happened to all the wee individual shops round your way that your Ma and your Granny used to love and still talk about where they could go into,buy needed stuff and have a bit of craic with the person behind the counter.


RedHand88

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Re: TG4 - Club Championships Coverage
« Reply #2304 on: November 27, 2022, 11:12:24 PM »
Just done a speed check on my Starlink connection; 167 mbps d/l and 23 u/l
I haven't seen any issues with speeds shrinking.

Uplink is the key speed barometer here - 23Mb/s is good for feeding 1080p to the streaming server, but little room to go any better. In my experience it's no better than EE 4G in most cases in d'north

Reports concerning shrinking speeds have come from here based on tests done with Ookla - but of course individual experiences can vary.

The likes of Starlink and other potential LEO satellite services (e.g. OneWeb) definitely have a place in areas where it is unlikely FTTP or a fast enough wireless terrestrial network (mobile or FWA) will likely reach, but while LEO satellite internet removes some of the bottlenecks that are inherent in Geostationary satellite internet, there's still a ceiling in the potential available - it's fine for now for most current customers, but as/if more customers come on stream, either more satellites are required (and there is realistically a finite number here - there's enough junk metal orbiting earth as it is!) and/or the available bandwidth has to be spread among more users. There's nothing unusual about this - as newer internet service technologies have come on over the years, new adopters often get great speeds for the technology of the time, but they get gradually slower as more users get on board with it, happened with ADSL, FTTC/VDSL2, 4G LTE and its starting to happen with 5G NR too. Even happened in the 80's & 90's with dial-up connections.

23Mbps is loads for 1080p - enough for 4k with modern encoders.

HEVC encoders on the market specced at 20Mbps max BW for 4k.

Professional broadcasters using HEVC at 6Mbps for news feeds and live with bonded sim and Satellite broadband at 1080i these days - might want to push it for sport content to 8Mbps with the extra motion.

You could certainly try running 4K video with HEVC at an 8Mb/s lossy bitrate as an uplink to a CDN server to TV studio, but the end results to the viewer will likely be sub-optimal. This is because even if that original stream looked fine, it will have been recompressed at least once by a further encoding to the end viewer (either via broadcast or IP delivery) as well as possible production use.

For linking purposes where only a lossy compression for video is practical (e.g. satellite, 4G or 5G mobile), consideration for what is intended to being filmed is required - if it's an OB only featuring interviewees there is little movement in pictures & most movements are generally predictable which isn't demanding on live encoding. However where there is lots of moving objects, where the camera is often moving and where there is quite a bit of detail in the images - like a lot of field sports - to prevent artifacting (before the picture even reaches the studio) the video encoders need a lot more elbow room to allow more frame difference pixels to be properly encoded for the same objective video quality compared to a couple of talking heads against a static background.

It's been a while since I was viewing satellite feeds, but I do recall that the live feeds for TG4's GAA Beo's OB broadcasts that were on Astra 3B at 23.5 East had their MPEG4  1080i video encoded at around 16-18 Mb/s alongside their main audio commentary track and a "no commentator" track that gave a crowd-only sound presumably so that footage could be reused without commentators as Gaelige on news reports and/or have dubbed commentary after the event. As these are live broadcasts and the feeds are SCPC, the video will be at a (mostly) fixed bitrates and in setting up will want to keep as much headspace as possible for when the encoders need to work their hardest.

Satellite use for non-critical OB use has markedly dropped in recent years, especially if the feed to the studio isn't live - if some amount of editing is done at the OB location then this can be pre-compressed using adjustable bitrates that usually is set of a perceived quality marker before being sent over an IP delivery system, be that mobile, LEO or geostationary satellies, landline xDSL or optical fibre links etc. which in essence isn't much different to uploading a video on YouTube. I've not a lot of experience myself of satellite broadband, but I'd imagine that since contention rates can be very variable and that it has only limited control over, it likely has issues with bursts & clogs of bandwidth both on downlink and uplink speeds similar to that with mobile internet, where doing a speed test can often see speeds vary wildly during the testing period due to what other users are themselves doing connected at either a specific cell site, or at another cell site that provides the bandwidth to a neigbhouring cell (usually a microwave link).

For what it's worth, as far as I'm aware there are no primary satellite based links to broadcasters covering the current soccer World Cup - instead, all of them are being delivered via private optical fibre connections to broadcasters. There are some satellite links in place (most of them encrypted) as a backup but I don't think anything's been required to need them so far.

You took the words right out of my mouth.

TwoUpTwoDown

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Re: TG4 - Club Championships Coverage
« Reply #2305 on: November 27, 2022, 11:22:55 PM »
Just done a speed check on my Starlink connection; 167 mbps d/l and 23 u/l
I haven't seen any issues with speeds shrinking.

Uplink is the key speed barometer here - 23Mb/s is good for feeding 1080p to the streaming server, but little room to go any better. In my experience it's no better than EE 4G in most cases in d'north

Reports concerning shrinking speeds have come from here based on tests done with Ookla - but of course individual experiences can vary.

The likes of Starlink and other potential LEO satellite services (e.g. OneWeb) definitely have a place in areas where it is unlikely FTTP or a fast enough wireless terrestrial network (mobile or FWA) will likely reach, but while LEO satellite internet removes some of the bottlenecks that are inherent in Geostationary satellite internet, there's still a ceiling in the potential available - it's fine for now for most current customers, but as/if more customers come on stream, either more satellites are required (and there is realistically a finite number here - there's enough junk metal orbiting earth as it is!) and/or the available bandwidth has to be spread among more users. There's nothing unusual about this - as newer internet service technologies have come on over the years, new adopters often get great speeds for the technology of the time, but they get gradually slower as more users get on board with it, happened with ADSL, FTTC/VDSL2, 4G LTE and its starting to happen with 5G NR too. Even happened in the 80's & 90's with dial-up connections.

23Mbps is loads for 1080p - enough for 4k with modern encoders.

HEVC encoders on the market specced at 20Mbps max BW for 4k.

Professional broadcasters using HEVC at 6Mbps for news feeds and live with bonded sim and Satellite broadband at 1080i these days - might want to push it for sport content to 8Mbps with the extra motion.

You could certainly try running 4K video with HEVC at an 8Mb/s lossy bitrate as an uplink to a CDN server to TV studio, but the end results to the viewer will likely be sub-optimal. This is because even if that original stream looked fine, it will have been recompressed at least once by a further encoding to the end viewer (either via broadcast or IP delivery) as well as possible production use.

For linking purposes where only a lossy compression for video is practical (e.g. satellite, 4G or 5G mobile), consideration for what is intended to being filmed is required - if it's an OB only featuring interviewees there is little movement in pictures & most movements are generally predictable which isn't demanding on live encoding. However where there is lots of moving objects, where the camera is often moving and where there is quite a bit of detail in the images - like a lot of field sports - to prevent artifacting (before the picture even reaches the studio) the video encoders need a lot more elbow room to allow more frame difference pixels to be properly encoded for the same objective video quality compared to a couple of talking heads against a static background.

It's been a while since I was viewing satellite feeds, but I do recall that the live feeds for TG4's GAA Beo's OB broadcasts that were on Astra 3B at 23.5 East had their MPEG4  1080i video encoded at around 16-18 Mb/s alongside their main audio commentary track and a "no commentator" track that gave a crowd-only sound presumably so that footage could be reused without commentators as Gaelige on news reports and/or have dubbed commentary after the event. As these are live broadcasts and the feeds are SCPC, the video will be at a (mostly) fixed bitrates and in setting up will want to keep as much headspace as possible for when the encoders need to work their hardest.

Satellite use for non-critical OB use has markedly dropped in recent years, especially if the feed to the studio isn't live - if some amount of editing is done at the OB location then this can be pre-compressed using adjustable bitrates that usually is set of a perceived quality marker before being sent over an IP delivery system, be that mobile, LEO or geostationary satellies, landline xDSL or optical fibre links etc. which in essence isn't much different to uploading a video on YouTube. I've not a lot of experience myself of satellite broadband, but I'd imagine that since contention rates can be very variable and that it has only limited control over, it likely has issues with bursts & clogs of bandwidth both on downlink and uplink speeds similar to that with mobile internet, where doing a speed test can often see speeds vary wildly during the testing period due to what other users are themselves doing connected at either a specific cell site, or at another cell site that provides the bandwidth to a neigbhouring cell (usually a microwave link).

For what it's worth, as far as I'm aware there are no primary satellite based links to broadcasters covering the current soccer World Cup - instead, all of them are being delivered via private optical fibre connections to broadcasters. There are some satellite links in place (most of them encrypted) as a backup but I don't think anything's been required to need them so far.

You took the words right out of my mouth.

Oh it must have been while you were kissing me