Author Topic: 11th night bonfires  (Read 14443 times)

Orior

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #15 on: July 05, 2017, 09:14:54 AM »
But hang on, maybe there is light at the end of the tunnel. The councils are applying to be the Capital of Culture.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-40499143

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seafoid

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #16 on: July 05, 2017, 09:42:30 AM »
Are bonfires part of Protestant culture anywhere other than the north of Ireland? Do Swedes burn bonfires with tricolours in them? Did Luther specify bonfires in his 95 conditions?
Maybe bonfires are a replacement for a shared protestant history in NI. Were there bonfires in july in the 1500s?
Joyce Carol Oates said that humans are the species that invents symbols in which to represent power and authority and then forgets that they are symbols. 
"you can try and intimidate us, but f**k youse, we're going to win an All-Ireland anyway"

MoChara

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #17 on: July 05, 2017, 10:04:25 AM »
Are bonfires part of Protestant culture anywhere other than the north of Ireland? Do Swedes burn bonfires with tricolours in them? Did Luther specify bonfires in his 95 conditions?
Maybe bonfires are a replacement for a shared protestant history in NI. Were there bonfires in july in the 1500s?
Joyce Carol Oates said that humans are the species that invents symbols in which to represent power and authority and then forgets that they are symbols.

But the bonfires aren't explicitly to celebrate Protestantism its supposed to be in remembrance of the natives lighting fires to help Williamite ships find their way down Belfast Lough to Carrickfergus.

 It may be used for triumphalism in the North but that isn't supposedly the stated intent.

Orior

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #18 on: July 05, 2017, 10:47:19 AM »
Are bonfires part of Protestant culture anywhere other than the north of Ireland? Do Swedes burn bonfires with tricolours in them? Did Luther specify bonfires in his 95 conditions?
Maybe bonfires are a replacement for a shared protestant history in NI. Were there bonfires in july in the 1500s?
Joyce Carol Oates said that humans are the species that invents symbols in which to represent power and authority and then forgets that they are symbols.

I though there were several plantations, the earliest was in the 17th century, not the 16th.
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seafoid

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #19 on: July 05, 2017, 11:04:31 AM »
Are bonfires part of Protestant culture anywhere other than the north of Ireland? Do Swedes burn bonfires with tricolours in them? Did Luther specify bonfires in his 95 conditions?
Maybe bonfires are a replacement for a shared protestant history in NI. Were there bonfires in july in the 1500s?
Joyce Carol Oates said that humans are the species that invents symbols in which to represent power and authority and then forgets that they are symbols.

I though there were several plantations, the earliest was in the 17th century, not the 16th.
Were they not there forever? Was Cuchulainn ot a unionist ?
"you can try and intimidate us, but f**k youse, we're going to win an All-Ireland anyway"

seafoid

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #20 on: July 05, 2017, 11:30:36 AM »
Are bonfires part of Protestant culture anywhere other than the north of Ireland? Do Swedes burn bonfires with tricolours in them? Did Luther specify bonfires in his 95 conditions?
Maybe bonfires are a replacement for a shared protestant history in NI. Were there bonfires in july in the 1500s?
Joyce Carol Oates said that humans are the species that invents symbols in which to represent power and authority and then forgets that they are symbols.

I though there were several plantations, the earliest was in the 17th century, not the 16th.
The first one was after ONeill left which was 17th century. The parades and bonfires are symbols od domination, for which a majority is required. Groupthink is hard to tweak.
"you can try and intimidate us, but f**k youse, we're going to win an All-Ireland anyway"

BenDover

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #21 on: July 05, 2017, 03:33:48 PM »
Was over at Avoniel leisure centre today and there's a bonfire going up in the grounds there. Mad.

Taylor

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #22 on: July 05, 2017, 04:00:51 PM »
With the added focus on the DUP now from the UK media you can be sure they will be trying to keep a lid on things this year.


armaghniac

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #23 on: July 05, 2017, 04:30:43 PM »
With the added focus on the DUP now from the UK media you can be sure they will be trying to keep a lid on things this year.

The losers involved with these things haven't enough intelligence to be concerned with public relations.
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T Fearon

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #24 on: July 05, 2017, 04:44:26 PM »
As a small child growing up in Portadown pre troubles I recall going to 11th night bonfires and I wasnt the only catholic.Too young to understand what it was about but got crisps and minerals like all the other kids and it seemed very harmless then compared to now.

I assume the working or unemployed class protestant insecurity factor now is manifest in bigger and bigger bonfires sadly.

tiempo

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #25 on: July 05, 2017, 05:09:03 PM »
As a small child growing up in Portadown pre troubles I recall going to 11th night bonfires and I wasnt the only catholic.Too young to understand what it was about but got crisps and minerals like all the other kids and it seemed very harmless then compared to now.

I assume the working or unemployed class protestant insecurity factor now is manifest in bigger and bigger bonfires sadly.

Dig it down deep throw it way out wide there Tone.

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T Fearon

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #26 on: July 05, 2017, 07:34:53 PM »
I am also of the opinion that the Orange Order would be all but irrelevant now had SF's policy of protesting not revived an organisation whose membership had dwindled seriously in the early 90s.
Best thing to do with parades and bonfires is ignore them

red hander

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #27 on: July 05, 2017, 07:48:53 PM »
I am also of the opinion that the Orange Order would be all but irrelevant now had SF's policy of protesting not revived an organisation whose membership had dwindled seriously in the early 90s.
Best thing to do with parades and bonfires is ignore them

Croppies lie down, let them trail their coats and walk all over you. Aye, right. You talk of your experience in Portadown. I've family from the Tunnel and I know well what the people of Obins Street and Parkside had to put up with in the 70s/80s, and what the people of Garvaghy Road had to deal with in 90s. Around 25 years ago the RUC forced an Orange parade through the 100% nationalist Panda estate in Dungannon. The b**tards even broke down doors to arrest people waving tricolours from their own bedroom windows and charged them with behaviour likely to cause a breach of the peace ... needless to say the judge laughed the police out of court and dismissed the cases. The strong protests from locals that day, who were batoned off their own streets, ensured those f**kers never walked that route again

armaghniac

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #28 on: July 05, 2017, 07:54:57 PM »
I am also of the opinion that the Orange Order would be all but irrelevant now had SF's policy of protesting not revived an organisation whose membership had dwindled seriously in the early 90s.
Best thing to do with parades and bonfires is ignore them

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StGallsGAA

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Re: 11th night bonfires
« Reply #29 on: July 05, 2017, 08:32:22 PM »
I am also of the opinion that the Orange Order would be all but irrelevant now had SF's policy of protesting not revived an organisation whose membership had dwindled seriously in the early 90s.
Best thing to do with parades and bonfires is ignore them

Croppies lie down, let them trail their coats and walk all over you. Aye, right. You talk of your experience in Portadown. I've family from the Tunnel and I know well what the people of Obins Street and Parkside had to put up with in the 70s/80s, and what the people of Garvaghy Road had to deal with in 90s. Around 25 years ago the RUC forced an Orange parade through the 100% nationalist Panda estate in Dungannon. The b**tards even broke down doors to arrest people waving tricolours from their own bedroom windows and charged them with behaviour likely to cause a breach of the peace ... needless to say the judge laughed the police out of court and dismissed the cases. The strong protests from locals that day, who were batoned off their own streets, ensured those f**kers never walked that route again

There was a loyalist parade thru the Panda around 1992?  Seriously doubt that RH.