Author Topic: Death Notices  (Read 624146 times)

Gabriel_Hurl

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4770 on: July 23, 2017, 03:13:11 AM »
Great actor .....

gallsman

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4771 on: July 25, 2017, 10:32:30 PM »
Indigenous Australian musician Geoffrey Gurrumul.
"Never mind your why. Why ain't in your repetoire no more n***a"

seafoid

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4772 on: July 25, 2017, 11:07:32 PM »
« Last Edit: July 25, 2017, 11:32:12 PM by seafoid »
Jaysus would you shtop

SHEEDY

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4773 on: July 28, 2017, 07:06:00 PM »
Little Charlie Gard. RIP. Hopefully his parents can move on and get some closure. Wasnt nice to see it all play out in the media.
nil satis nisi optimum

gallsman

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4774 on: July 28, 2017, 07:23:49 PM »
Little Charlie Gard. RIP. Hopefully his parents can move on and get some closure. Wasnt nice to see it all play out in the media.

RIP

It wasn't nice to see all the publicity and controversy but it was all of their own doing unfortunately.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2017, 07:27:03 PM by gallsman »
"Never mind your why. Why ain't in your repetoire no more n***a"

theskull1

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4775 on: July 28, 2017, 10:54:56 PM »
+1
It’s a lot easier to sing karaoke than to sing opera

longballin

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4776 on: July 29, 2017, 12:31:50 AM »
Little Charlie Gard. RIP. Hopefully his parents can move on and get some closure. Wasnt nice to see it all play out in the media.

RIP

It wasn't nice to see all the publicity and controversy but it was all of their own doing unfortunately.

unless you're been in that position impossible to know.... God help them .. very tragic

foxcommander

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4777 on: July 29, 2017, 06:45:10 AM »
Little Charlie Gard. RIP. Hopefully his parents can move on and get some closure. Wasnt nice to see it all play out in the media.

RIP

It wasn't nice to see all the publicity and controversy but it was all of their own doing unfortunately.

Come on. What a shitty thing to say.
Every second of the day there's a Democrat telling a lie

omaghjoe

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4778 on: July 29, 2017, 07:47:59 AM »
Little Charlie Gard. RIP. Hopefully his parents can move on and get some closure. Wasnt nice to see it all play out in the media.

RIP

It wasn't nice to see all the publicity and controversy but it was all of their own doing unfortunately.

No weans o your own then?
Thought not! Ye POS

Owen Brannigan

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4779 on: July 29, 2017, 08:17:11 AM »
Very few of us will have gone through the sorrow and the grief of Charlie Gard's parents nor experienced at first hand the pain and suffering of a first born child struggling with a terminal illness. The parents will never recover from this loss and while many, standing back in judgment, will disagree with much that has happened regarding the legal case and other interjections, all must realise that grieving parents will do whatever they can for their dying child. I would hope but probably know otherwise that the parents will be supported by many of those previously involved as they struggle through the dark times ahead for them.

We should be thankful to the staff of GOSH and the facility they provide to all NHS users in their care for children with relatively rare conditions. They always put the needs of children first. Many from this country have availed of their help. They have not come through this unscathed.

Rightfully, there is and will be anger towards those who exploited the plight of Charle Gard and his parents for their own theological and political ends but no one should blame the parents for being exploited by people from Trump and US ideologues fighting to remove healthcare from their own citizens, to the Pope and preachers making it a right to life issue because Charlie was an infant, to the US doctor seeking publicity while not bothering to review the child's records or scans.

Not often I would quote the Daily Mail as a source but it is worthwhile looking at this article......

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4741296/The-experts-saviours-gave-Charlie-s-parents-hope.html

gallsman

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4780 on: July 29, 2017, 09:08:50 AM »
Once l again, the resident board idiots are incapable of discussing anything without resorting to emotion and bluster.

His parents of course wanted nothing more than to try and save their son and deserve all the sympathy and empathy in the world. Their campaign has been badly hijacked and exploited but even in their final statement when giving up the legal battle, they made false claims that he could have been saved.

The below, again from a surprising source, is a very good read on the matter.

http://www.melaniephillips.com/cruel-ignorant-campaign/
"Never mind your why. Why ain't in your repetoire no more n***a"

theskull1

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4781 on: July 29, 2017, 09:57:38 AM »
Theres ugly realities potentially at play here and the abuse/threats to NHS staff is collateral damage when it comes to driving these myopic campaigns that are founded on emotion instead of facts. Social justice warriors/campaigners shown to be receptive to what they want to hear rather than the full arguments.
Excuse some for being slightly cynical about the opportunities to exploit as a result of played out dramas. That might be a thing
It’s a lot easier to sing karaoke than to sing opera

T Fearon

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4782 on: July 29, 2017, 11:01:16 AM »
Agreed.If expert medical opinion maintains that an illness is untreatable and incurable,unfortunately fate will take its course.

longballin

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4783 on: July 29, 2017, 11:07:32 AM »
If you think there is any hope however illogical it seems to others you will hold onto it... maybe those who dont have children dont fully understand this.

gallsman

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Re: Death Notices
« Reply #4784 on: July 29, 2017, 11:24:33 AM »
If you think there is any hope however illogical it seems to others you will hold onto it... maybe those who dont have children dont fully understand this.

I don't think you'll find too many who disagree with that. That doesn't mean it's what's best for the child. The attacks on GOSH and its staff are certainly not in the best interests of anybody.

From Janice Turner in The Times

Quote
Imagine startng your nursing shift on a children’s cancer ward with demonstrators calling you scum. Or trying to keep your daughter calm as she is admitted for heart surgery amid a placard-waving march. If we can, why couldn’t Charlie Gard’s parents who purported to be the embodiment of selfless love?

They said it was all for Charlie, that they just wanted to save their little boy. They said the death threats to Great Ormond Street staff were not in their name, their case just struck an emotional chord. And when the legal arguments were about efficacy of treatment, we could forgive their strange alliances with far-right US preachers, put their screaming at judges and denial of expert evidence down to a noble, grief-fuelled battle for their son.

And yesterday in a hospice poor Connie Yates and Chris Gard finally said farewell to their terminally ill son. But did it have to end this way, with only anger for the hospital that cared for him for so long? They must have known, or at least have been advised, that dragging GOSH back to court then declaring “we’ve been denied our final wish” to let him die at home would only recharge the hate. They ignored the ever-patient doctors saying no amount of love could get Charlie’s vast high-pressure ventilator through their front door or that taking him out of ICU risked a disordered, painful death.

If they die we don’t believe we’ll see them in some better place
Because this wasn’t about their child, but about them. They “promised Charlie” he’d sleep for two days in the home he’d never seen, could never see, since he was unconscious, in the cot they had bought. No matter that their tragic fantasy of an ordinary life would divert intensive care staff away from other babies who might live. As the Rev Giles Fraser wrote in The Guardian in praise of the Gards: “I would rain fire on the whole world to hold my child for a day longer.”

So would I. Because parental love is the most selfish love of all. Not altruistic, but Darwinian: we are programmed to perpetuate our genes, our bloodline. We’d give our children our savings, organs, our last breath. Yet we do so heedless of all beyond our own kin, and drive our precious cargo around in fortress 4x4s, unconcerned that we imperil every other passing kid.

Yet is parental concern, at heart, about our own self-protection? Please don’t stray far, I’d say when my sons were small. Please don’t ride motorbikes or join the army, I beg now. Just try not to die! Not only because I love you, for your unique, wonderful self, but because your death would leave me struggling to live. In an areligious world our children are our household gods. And if they die we don’t believe we’ll see them again in some better place: they are just gone and we are left alone, undone.

So the Gards cannot be blamed for delaying the ultimate emotional pain, even if it meant perpetuating their son’s physical suffering. Was it ever a loving act to keep Charlie alive? Even if the US neurologist Professor Michio Hirano had been permitted to treat him, the prognosis was hopeless. His most successful patient so far, six-year-old Arturito Estopinan, is still profoundly brain-damaged and needs a respirator most of the time. His father reports: “He can now move his fingers, hands and toes, and sit (with support) at a 90 degree angle for 90 minutes compared to a 45 degree angle for 15 minutes previously.”

The parent prepared to lose their child is the truly selfless one
Is that enough of an existence for a child? Arturito’s parents clearly think so and sacrifice their lives to care for him. But as medical science advances, children, many born prematurely with profound disabilities, are sustained where once they’d have peacefully died. With his rare genetic disorder Charlie Gard could never have been, whatever his mother’s belief, “a normal little boy”, but barely sentient, strapped to machinery, in medically preserved limbo. In the hospital’s oddly poetic legalese “Charlie’s has been an existence devoid of all benefit and pleasure”, “his relationship with the world around him has been one of suffering”.

David Cameron was once asked if his son Ivan, who had cerebral palsy and severe epilepsy, enjoyed his life. “Not really,” Cameron replied. “I think his life is very tough.” He and his wife always downplayed their sacrifices to care for him, until his death aged six: “It was only Ivan that ever really suffered.” Their love was clear-eyed: we know the price of still holding you in our arms is your pain.

It is perhaps to be expected that Giles Fraser, a priest, values belief over science, thinks that “love must carry greater weight than the calculations of reason”. But sometimes love is cruel and faith is blind. In 2012 the High Court ruled to switch off the life support of an eight-year-old with lung failure whose Christian parents wished to keep him alive. Ignoring evidence that he had no hope of recovery and would die of an infection, they insisted they could summon up a miracle with their prayers.

It is the parent who is prepared to put their child first, even if it means losing him, who is truly selfless. Like Mark and Julie James, who accompanied their son Daniel, 23, to a Dignitas clinic, because he felt that being paralysed from the neck down in a rugby accident had given him “a second-class existence”. And this is what the Gards faced in the end.

When we speak of “dignity in dying” and “quality of life” we mostly mean the old, those who’ve already had a life, not someone who has barely lived. The only positive outcome of Charlie’s tragic year is that he has made us consider many hard truths. Including whether the pure force of parental love is always best for a child.
"Never mind your why. Why ain't in your repetoire no more n***a"