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GAA Discussion => GAA Discussion => Topic started by: Wildweasel74 on August 11, 2013, 04:04:07 PM

Title: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on August 11, 2013, 04:04:07 PM
As always when played in the right way the game of hurling is hard to surpass and i am a out and out football man who never played hurling.
You watch the dublin cork game on tv and it is easily better for spectators than anything the football has produced this year.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: armaghniac on August 11, 2013, 04:09:07 PM
Apart from skill, today's game is close, whereas the likes of Mayo-Donegal wasn't competitive.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on August 11, 2013, 04:13:52 PM
Why do we get this every time we see a half decent game of hurling?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 11, 2013, 04:17:15 PM
Give me a 7-6 mudfest between Urney and Brocagh any day.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rois on August 11, 2013, 04:18:09 PM
Why do we get this every time we see a half decent game of hurling?

I was waiting for this post too. zzzzz
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: From the Bunker on August 11, 2013, 04:22:13 PM
Imagine if at the beginning of the year football decided to make their Code Elite and we had 10 team competing for Sam. There was two provincial titles on offer North West with Mayo, Donegal, Tyrone, Down, Galway and South East with Cork, Kerry, Dublin, Meath, Kildare. You'd have a really big game every week in the front door and big games in the back door from June to September. The provincial titles would be much bigger and harder to win and hold more weight. The teams/Counties involved would get better from the top class games, bigger gates and the pundits would turn into the hurling pundits praising the games every week.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: babarino on August 11, 2013, 04:28:58 PM
Why do we get this every time we see a half decent game of hurling?

If it had been football do you think Treacy would have scored that goal for Dublin?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: From the Bunker on August 11, 2013, 04:29:57 PM
Apart from skill, today's game is close, whereas the likes of Mayo-Donegal wasn't competitive.

Yeah, reminded me of the 2008 All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship Final!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on August 11, 2013, 04:37:47 PM
Do dublin fans not get fed up booing the opposition all the time
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rois on August 11, 2013, 04:44:35 PM
Cynical referring there.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: rodney trotter on August 11, 2013, 04:46:44 PM
Epic game..
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Gabriel_Hurl on August 11, 2013, 04:46:55 PM
http://gaaboard.com/board/index.php?board=4.0
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: muppet on August 11, 2013, 05:05:52 PM
Epic game..

Agreed, but completely unreffable. - (Hardy is that a real word?)
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on August 11, 2013, 05:08:24 PM
It's a fine word, real or not.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Aristo 60 on August 11, 2013, 05:08:45 PM
As always when played in the right way the game of hurling is hard to surpass and i am a out and out football man who never played hurling.
You watch the dublin cork game on tv and it is easily better for spectators than anything the football has produced this year.

Just booked tickets for Limerick & Clare...my first big hurling game, so hoping for a good one.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on August 11, 2013, 05:17:53 PM
Love the way the same old lads get upset every time someone starts a thread like this.  ;D

Hurling is the greatest game there is. This year's Championship has been wonderful.
Aristo 60 enjoy the game, should be a good one.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: BennyHarp on August 11, 2013, 05:20:48 PM
Why do we get this every time we see a half decent game of hurling?

If it had been football do you think Treacy would have scored that goal for Dublin?

With a few mins to go Cork were quite happy to drag down a Dublin forward so not to concede a goal and concede a 21 yard free instead.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: neilthemac on August 11, 2013, 05:25:39 PM
where's Joe Brolly when ya need him?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: muppet on August 11, 2013, 05:29:22 PM
where's Joe Brolly when ya need him?

Probably bollocking Bambi somewhere.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: armaghniac on August 11, 2013, 05:40:09 PM
Tyrone have ruined football, they don't have much influence in hurlıng.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Farrandeelin on August 11, 2013, 06:28:21 PM
Cynical referring there.

Referring to what, may I ask? :P
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: haze on August 11, 2013, 08:31:31 PM
The 2013 hurling championship has been unbelievably entertaining but that has been almost entirely due to its undpredictability and the ending of the Kilkenny/Tipp duopoly rather than the actual games themselves. Today's game was the first old school classic and I like a lot of others got caught up in it and despaired a little for this years football championship.

Give me Armagh Tyrone 05 any day over Dublin Cork today, in fact give me bad football over mediocre hurling but when there is an epic hurling game it is hard not understand that from, the casual observer of Gaelic Games to the hardcore hurling snobs, might think hurling is the greatest game of all.

Ultimate irony for this years hurling championship is that Cork can still continue the big 3's 15 year stranglehold on the Liam McCarthy whereas in football we could possibly see out 6th different winner in 6 years.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: muppet on August 11, 2013, 08:38:36 PM
The 2013 hurling championship has been unbelievably entertaining but that has been almost entirely due to its undpredictability and the ending of the Kilkenny/Tipp duopoly rather than the actual games themselves. Today's game was the first old school classic and I like a lot of others got caught up in it and despaired a little for this years football championship.

Give me Armagh Tyrone 05 any day over Dublin Cork today, in fact give me bad football over mediocre hurling but when there is an epic hurling game it is hard not understand that from, the casual observer of Gaelic Games to the hardcore hurling snobs, might think hurling is the greatest game of all.

Ultimate irony for this years hurling championship is that Cork can still continue the big 3's 15 year stranglehold on the Liam McCarthy whereas in football we could possibly see out 6th different winner in 6 years.

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Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Aaron Boone on August 11, 2013, 08:40:24 PM
Exactly.
Cork, Tipp & Kilkenny have won 90 of the Hurling All-Ireland's. Cork to win it this year for me.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: trileacman on August 11, 2013, 09:01:58 PM
Delighted to see Kilkenny toppled. They were destroying Hurling as a spectator sport for me.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: From the Bunker on August 11, 2013, 09:11:05 PM
The 2013 hurling championship has been unbelievably entertaining but that has been almost entirely due to its undpredictability and the ending of the Kilkenny/Tipp duopoly rather than the actual games themselves. Today's game was the first old school classic and I like a lot of others got caught up in it and despaired a little for this years football championship.

Give me Armagh Tyrone 05 any day over Dublin Cork today, in fact give me bad football over mediocre hurling but when there is an epic hurling game it is hard not understand that from, the casual observer of Gaelic Games to the hardcore hurling snobs, might think hurling is the greatest game of all.

Ultimate irony for this years hurling championship is that Cork can still continue the big 3's 15 year stranglehold on the Liam McCarthy whereas in football we could possibly see out 6th different winner in 6 years.

As i said, if football decided to make their Code Elite and we had only 10 teams competing for Sam. If there was two provincial titles on offer North West with Mayo, Donegal, Tyrone, Down, Galway and South East with Cork, Kerry, Dublin, Meath, Kildare. You'd have a really big game every week in the front door and big games in the back door from June to September. The provincial titles would be much bigger and harder to win and hold more weight. The teams/Counties involved would get better from the top class games, bigger gates and the pundits would turn into the hurling pundits praising the games every week.

The rest would be left in the lower tiered Cups drifting into oblivion and fading at ever becoming major powers or even entertaining it. But sure we could still marvel at the Elite teams, their great skills, their great squads and their yearly push for an ALL IRELAND ! An All Ireland with 10 teams competing in it! But sure the we'd be reassured by the pundits that even boring one sided games had great skill and it was the best game in the world.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: DJGaliv on August 11, 2013, 10:38:43 PM
Isn't hurling great?
Few men can master the stick work (niche sport in 10 counties or when sliothar is on the floor an arse measuring contest), majestic physicality, passion (pulling across a mans chest) and drama (shockingly inconsistent refereeing with no defined tackle as in gaelic football).  To be honest I don't know which side I believe.

Lets not analyse it too much or point at the flaws. You rarely hear the self reflection in the analysis of a hurling game. Is that a lesson for Gaelic football?
However the constant screaming of hurling fans about how great it is tells me the lady doth protest too much. The game is spun by lads that want to spread the gospel of hurling. Cyril Farrell and Ger Loughnane - great hurling men. When have you heard anyone called a great football man?

Today there was plenty of short passing, Cork player going down fairly easily clutching his face through his helmet to get the Dublin lad his second yellow, and terrible inconsistent refereeing. You want to talk about defining the tackle in Gaelic football? Give my head peace.

But hey, what a game.

For me it's like the stupid hot hairdresser you see. I wouldn't never leave my beautiful intelligent wife (gaelic football) for her, but there's an odd night you'd be tempted to book a hotel room.

As I said, hurling - isn't it great, but let's not scratch beneath the surface too much.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: trileacman on August 11, 2013, 10:46:31 PM
Watched the last 10 mins of the Dublin-Mayo semi last year and it was a cracker now that I look back on it. The semi-finals usually through up a top match every year in both codes.

Funny how when we see a fantastic match in football (Kerry-Galway 08), (Tyrone-Armagh 05), (Mayo- Dublin 06) never does some-one voice the opinion "wasn't it better than seeing the Cats bore their way to an All-Ireland" but when there is a decent hurling match the occasion cannot pass without a "jaysus that was better than a football " comment.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 11, 2013, 11:15:49 PM


Funny how when we see a fantastic match in football (Kerry-Galway 08), (Tyrone-Armagh 05), (Mayo- Dublin 06) never does some-one voice the opinion "wasn't it better than seeing the Cats bore their way to an All-Ireland" but when there is a decent hurling match the occasion cannot pass without a "jaysus that was better than a football " comment.

That's an excellent observation.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on August 11, 2013, 11:21:22 PM
You will hear, "how could you watch soccer after that?" and other ballbaggy comments though.

Let's not pretend that Gaelic football fans are far removed from sport snobbery.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 11, 2013, 11:23:53 PM
You will hear, "how could you watch soccer after that?" and other ballbaggy comments though.

Let's not pretend that Gaelic football fans are far removed from sport snobbery.

That is true too. But I've never heard football fans denigrate hurling.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on August 11, 2013, 11:24:29 PM
You will hear, "how could you watch soccer after that?" and other ballbaggy comments though.

Let's not pretend that Gaelic football fans are far removed from sport snobbery.

That is true too. But I've never heard football fans denigrate hurling.
Aye, cos it's better. :D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on August 11, 2013, 11:30:38 PM


For me it's like the stupid hot hairdresser you see. I wouldn't never leave my beautiful intelligent wife (gaelic football) for her, but there's an odd night you'd be tempted to book a hotel room.



 ;D
Football is more like the farmers daughter with the chunky thighs and a hairy lip.Hurling is the graceful ballet dancer with legs that go on and on and on..
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on August 11, 2013, 11:31:45 PM
Watched the last 10 mins of the Dublin-Mayo semi last year and it was a cracker now that I look back on it. The semi-finals usually through up a top match every year in both codes.

Funny how when we see a fantastic match in football (Kerry-Galway 08), (Tyrone-Armagh 05), (Mayo- Dublin 06) never does some-one voice the opinion "wasn't it better than seeing the Cats bore their way to an All-Ireland" but when there is a decent hurling match the occasion cannot pass without a "jaysus that was better than a football " comment.

Bullshit.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on August 11, 2013, 11:35:38 PM
It may also be the case that hurling is easier watched because the RTE pundits actually like the game. Their football counterparts seem to totally despise their game and have us all thinking "This game is a lot of bollox" before the ball is even thrown in. A depressing shower of whinging cnuts.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 11, 2013, 11:37:53 PM
It may also be the case that hurling is easier watched because the RTE pundits actually like the game. Their football counterparts seem to totally despise their game and have us all thinking "This game is a lot of bollox" before the ball is even thrown in. A depressing shower of whinging cnuts.

That's why I always think England are going to win the World Cup.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on August 11, 2013, 11:38:41 PM
Still nawthing on the AI club final in March.

Great game, though.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on August 11, 2013, 11:39:48 PM
Watched the last 10 mins of the Dublin-Mayo semi last year and it was a cracker now that I look back on it. The semi-finals usually through up a top match every year in both codes.

Funny how when we see a fantastic match in football (Kerry-Galway 08), (Tyrone-Armagh 05), (Mayo- Dublin 06) never does some-one voice the opinion "wasn't it better than seeing the Cats bore their way to an All-Ireland" but when there is a decent hurling match the occasion cannot pass without a "jaysus that was better than a football " comment.

There were some classic hurling matches throughout the noughties but you fail to mention any of them, your point being that the football games were better. The last great GAA game was played today. The rest is history and fair play to Dublin and Cork for a fantatstic occasion.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 11, 2013, 11:46:47 PM
Hurling can be shite too.

2 strikes of the sliotar and it's a point, from one keeper to the other end. 28 players ignored.

Also, 91% of the clearances are to no one in particular. Like football in 1977.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on August 11, 2013, 11:55:42 PM
We want to see scores, not passes.

Teams do now have a keep possession (feckin about) game. I find that style hard to watch. Too many opportunities for mistakes.

Hurlers are a hell of a lot more accurate with the stick than footballers are with the boot. When they clear the ball 80 yards, they still give their own man more of a chance to win it than footballers do with a 30 yard pass.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: blast05 on August 11, 2013, 11:59:20 PM
Watched the last 10 mins of the Dublin-Mayo semi last year and it was a cracker now that I look back on it. The semi-finals usually through up a top match every year in both codes.

Funny how when we see a fantastic match in football (Kerry-Galway 08), (Tyrone-Armagh 05), (Mayo- Dublin 06) never does some-one voice the opinion "wasn't it better than seeing the Cats bore their way to an All-Ireland" but when there is a decent hurling match the occasion cannot pass without a "jaysus that was better than a football " comment.

Bullshit.

Why is it bullshit ? It is definitely true to say that in the aftermath of a great game of football that football supporters don't feel some bizarre need to stick the chest out and say gaelic football is the greatest sport ever even though many many of us believe it truely is (we are entitled to our view!)
This hurling superiority nonsense is a deep down inferiority thing ..... hurling knows its on the hind tit in terms of the overall level of interest in the sport compared to football. It knows that it will never compete with gaelic football in the hearts and minds of those outside the small hurling heartlands. It knows that it needs a broader audience and hence why it is orgasmic with delight at the way this years championship is panning out.

The superiority thing is just painful to listen to. A flavour of the bullshit i will have to listen to tomorrow in work from various hurling heads:
"Jaysus, you'd never see a game like that in football" ..... correct, its a different sport.
"After watching that, it would remind you why i wouldn't cross the road to see my county in an All-Ireland football final" ... why oh why the need to say this ?
And when talking about the golf .... "ara, that aul golf is just protestant hurling"
Change the bloody tune.


And the reality of all this ..... the game today, while highliy entertaining and showing great levels of skills also could have the adjectives 'nice' and 'innocent' used to describe it. 'Nice' FFS
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 12, 2013, 12:00:36 AM
That's only because the ball moves faster between player a and b. An 80 yard pass in football takes 3.5 times longer to reach its target, bringing in to play 3-4 variables.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on August 12, 2013, 12:02:22 AM
Watched the last 10 mins of the Dublin-Mayo semi last year and it was a cracker now that I look back on it. The semi-finals usually through up a top match every year in both codes.

Funny how when we see a fantastic match in football (Kerry-Galway 08), (Tyrone-Armagh 05), (Mayo- Dublin 06) never does some-one voice the opinion "wasn't it better than seeing the Cats bore their way to an All-Ireland" but when there is a decent hurling match the occasion cannot pass without a "jaysus that was better than a football " comment.

Bullshit.

Why is it bullshit ? It is definitely true to say that in the aftermath of a great game of football that football supporters don't feel some bizarre need to stick the chest out and say gaelic football is the greatest sport ever
Who are you trying to kid?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 12, 2013, 12:04:41 AM
Watched the last 10 mins of the Dublin-Mayo semi last year and it was a cracker now that I look back on it. The semi-finals usually through up a top match every year in both codes.

Funny how when we see a fantastic match in football (Kerry-Galway 08), (Tyrone-Armagh 05), (Mayo- Dublin 06) never does some-one voice the opinion "wasn't it better than seeing the Cats bore their way to an All-Ireland" but when there is a decent hurling match the occasion cannot pass without a "jaysus that was better than a football " comment.

Bullshit.

Why is it bullshit ? It is definitely true to say that in the aftermath of a great game of football that football supporters don't feel some bizarre need to stick the chest out and say gaelic football is the greatest sport ever
Who are you trying to kid?

Antrim hurling aficionados are the worst. They won't even watch the football final.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on August 12, 2013, 12:06:06 AM
That's only because the ball moves faster between player a and b. An 80 yard pass in football takes 3.5 times longer to reach its target, bringing in to play 3-4 variables.
I did compare the 80 yard hurling pass to the 30 yard football pass. Keep up.

The ball itself has a lot to do with it. If a back gets a touch on a football coming from 30 yards, it'll travel a fair distance from the two competing for it. A hurling ball will almost drop dead, giving the forward a better chance of getting it.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on August 12, 2013, 12:06:13 AM
Watched the last 10 mins of the Dublin-Mayo semi last year and it was a cracker now that I look back on it. The semi-finals usually through up a top match every year in both codes.

Funny how when we see a fantastic match in football (Kerry-Galway 08), (Tyrone-Armagh 05), (Mayo- Dublin 06) never does some-one voice the opinion "wasn't it better than seeing the Cats bore their way to an All-Ireland" but when there is a decent hurling match the occasion cannot pass without a "jaysus that was better than a football " comment.

Bullshit.

Why is it bullshit ? It is definitely true to say that in the aftermath of a great game of football that football supporters don't feel some bizarre need to stick the chest out and say gaelic football is the greatest sport ever
Who are you trying to kid?

What's funny is the thread was started by a self confessed football man.....
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on August 12, 2013, 12:07:04 AM
Watched the last 10 mins of the Dublin-Mayo semi last year and it was a cracker now that I look back on it. The semi-finals usually through up a top match every year in both codes.

Funny how when we see a fantastic match in football (Kerry-Galway 08), (Tyrone-Armagh 05), (Mayo- Dublin 06) never does some-one voice the opinion "wasn't it better than seeing the Cats bore their way to an All-Ireland" but when there is a decent hurling match the occasion cannot pass without a "jaysus that was better than a football " comment.

Bullshit.

Why is it bullshit ? It is definitely true to say that in the aftermath of a great game of football that football supporters don't feel some bizarre need to stick the chest out and say gaelic football is the greatest sport ever
Who are you trying to kid?

Antrim hurling aficionados are the worst. They won't even watch the football final.
Fcuk off, Celtic were playing and the Kelstar were doing buy one get one free on pasties.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on August 12, 2013, 12:37:44 AM
Isn't hurling great?
Few men can master the stick work (niche sport in 10 counties or when sliothar is on the floor an arse measuring contest), majestic physicality, passion (pulling across a mans chest) and drama (shockingly inconsistent refereeing with no defined tackle as in gaelic football).  To be honest I don't know which side I believe.

Lets not analyse it too much or point at the flaws. You rarely hear the self reflection in the analysis of a hurling game. Is that a lesson for Gaelic football?
However the constant screaming of hurling fans about how great it is tells me the lady doth protest too much. The game is spun by lads that want to spread the gospel of hurling. Cyril Farrell and Ger Loughnane - great hurling men. When have you heard anyone called a great football man?

Today there was plenty of short passing, Cork player going down fairly easily clutching his face through his helmet to get the Dublin lad his second yellow, and terrible inconsistent refereeing. You want to talk about defining the tackle in Gaelic football? Give my head peace.

But hey, what a game.

For me it's like the stupid hot hairdresser you see. I wouldn't never leave my beautiful intelligent wife (gaelic football) for her, but there's an odd night you'd be tempted to book a hotel room.

As I said, hurling - isn't it great, but let's not scratch beneath the surface too much.


That's what I'd like to have said.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on August 12, 2013, 12:41:29 AM
We want to see scores, not passes.

Teams do now have a keep possession (feckin about) game. I find that style hard to watch. Too many opportunities for mistakes.

Hurlers are a hell of a lot more accurate with the stick than footballers are with the boot. When they clear the ball 80 yards, they still give their own man more of a chance to win it than footballers do with a 30 yard pass.

That's true. I think it's because it's easier to be accurate with your hands than with your feet.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on August 12, 2013, 01:51:23 AM
Am a football man, but even i know hurling a better game than the gaelic football, i don think there even a good argument that footballs a better game outside the fact that Ulster and the west dont often much to hurling in terms of competitive teams!!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on August 12, 2013, 02:02:25 AM
Football for me anyway, always enjoyed and played both codes but nothing beats football, the best game on earth.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on August 12, 2013, 02:27:44 AM
We want to see scores, not passes.

Teams do now have a keep possession (feckin about) game. I find that style hard to watch. Too many opportunities for mistakes.

Hurlers are a hell of a lot more accurate with the stick than footballers are with the boot. When they clear the ball 80 yards, they still give their own man more of a chance to win it than footballers do with a 30 yard pass.

That's true. I think it's because it's easier to be accurate with your hands than with your feet.

Clearly you're saying footballers are far more skilled than hurlers.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Sidney on August 12, 2013, 02:40:47 AM
Hurling is a more skilful game than Gaelic football.

That point's not even up for debate.

If only you could see the ball.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ballela-angel on August 12, 2013, 02:55:50 AM
Started out playing football, then turned to hurling - After playing hurling for a while I mixed it with some football, mostly 7-aside and found that I had no fear at all of going in to block a kick and I was also very sure-handed when catching high balls above my head - Both talents I believe came from playing hurling- I wonder if anyone else had this experience
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on August 12, 2013, 03:53:29 AM
There's nothing as skilful as a bullock run up the field in football, lads.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on August 12, 2013, 07:10:33 AM
Hurling is a more skilful game than Gaelic football.

That point's not even up for debate.

Of course it's not up for debate but it's always funny to hear lads try and tell you otherwise.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on August 12, 2013, 08:32:34 AM
Cricket is more skilful than handball too. But handball beats poker and swimming every time. Snooker vs. golf - that's still up for debate.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 12, 2013, 08:33:31 AM
Ever seen bog-snorkling?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on August 12, 2013, 08:34:55 AM
I've never even seen a bog.


(But hurling puts it in the shade.)
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jonah on August 12, 2013, 09:00:45 AM
I can't understand the need for a debate like this anyway.
Hurling and football only supporters are as bad as each other anyway not that they would ever admit it.You have hurling lads having a go at football when there is a good game and telling us all how it's so much better and you have football lads having a go at the Premier League and how Gaelic is so superior to soccer every other day. Load of bullshit the lot of it.

I love sport in general and wouldn't consider myself hurling or football.
I don't understand this notion as someone said earlier that they would rather watch a bad football game than a good hurling one(or vice versa) I would rather watch a good soccer game than a bad football one,or a good football game than a bad hurling game and so on. When I watch sport I want to be entertained I don't see the need to try and defend a particular sport so much that I'd say I would rather watch a bad game of it rather than admitting to enjoying a different sport.

Yesterday was a wonderful game of hurling and it was a breath of fresh air after all the negativity surrounding the football over the last few weeks. I don't see how someone can say it was a half decent game of hurling  ::) It was a superb game and we should just see it as that and not that hurling is better than football but that yesterday was a brilliant GAA match.
Yes the hurling championship has imo being excellent this year and the football has yet to really ignite but let's just enjoy both for what they are and not worry about which is better. Those two teams yesterday were a credit to the GAA and their respective counties.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: deiseach on August 12, 2013, 09:01:03 AM
Snooker vs. golf - that's still up for debate.

Sports whose participants generally hail from very different socio-economic backgrounds, yet where even professionals will routinely call fouls against themselves. Fascinating.

What was the question again?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on August 12, 2013, 09:13:45 AM
Snooker vs. golf - that's still up for debate.

Sports whose participants generally hail from very different socio-economic backgrounds, yet where even professionals will routinely call fouls against themselves. Fascinating.

What was the question again?

It was a statement: "Hurling is a more skilful game than Gaelic football."

Anyway - croquet anybody?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: deiseach on August 12, 2013, 09:17:43 AM
It was a statement: "Hurling is a more skilful game than Gaelic football."

Anyway - croquet anybody?

Oh right. Yes, croquet sounds delightful, especially when fuelled by Pimms.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 12, 2013, 09:27:47 AM
I can't understand the need for a debate like this anyway.



95% aren't being serious.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: deiseach on August 12, 2013, 09:34:42 AM
I can't understand the need for a debate like this anyway.



95% aren't being serious.

95% don't start out as serious. But then someone presses a sore spot...
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 12, 2013, 10:09:57 AM


95% don't start out as serious. But then someone presses a sore spot...

Only a dimwit would declare one game is better than another or the greatest.

You might have a personal preference as you would in beer or women or men.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Farrandeelin on August 12, 2013, 10:20:46 AM
Isn't hurling great?
Few men can master the stick work (niche sport in 10 counties or when sliothar is on the floor an arse measuring contest), majestic physicality, passion (pulling across a mans chest) and drama (shockingly inconsistent refereeing with no defined tackle as in gaelic football).  To be honest I don't know which side I believe.

Lets not analyse it too much or point at the flaws. You rarely hear the self reflection in the analysis of a hurling game. Is that a lesson for Gaelic football?
However the constant screaming of hurling fans about how great it is tells me the lady doth protest too much. The game is spun by lads that want to spread the gospel of hurling. Cyril Farrell and Ger Loughnane - great hurling men. When have you heard anyone called a great football man?

Today there was plenty of short passing, Cork player going down fairly easily clutching his face through his helmet to get the Dublin lad his second yellow, and terrible inconsistent refereeing. You want to talk about defining the tackle in Gaelic football? Give my head peace.

But hey, what a game.

For me it's like the stupid hot hairdresser you see. I wouldn't never leave my beautiful intelligent wife (gaelic football) for her, but there's an odd night you'd be tempted to book a hotel room.

As I said, hurling - isn't it great, but let's not scratch beneath the surface too much.

That was a great post.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: RedandGreenSniper on August 12, 2013, 10:31:03 AM
I've never even seen a bog.


(But hurling puts it in the shade.)

Does that mean you won't get sunburned in the bog so?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: deiseach on August 12, 2013, 10:44:02 AM


95% don't start out as serious. But then someone presses a sore spot...

Only a dimwit would declare one game is better than another or the greatest.

You might have a personal preference as you would in beer or women or men.

Are you accusing the denizens of this board of being dimwits?

Oh.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 12, 2013, 10:56:33 AM
Seriously though. It's like when adults argue whether the iphone or Android is the best phone. Depresses me. Not really like.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: pullhard on August 12, 2013, 11:20:17 AM
Apart from skill, today's game is close, whereas the likes of Mayo-Donegal wasn't competitive.

Yeah, reminded me of the 2008 All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship Final!

That game was a classic. It’s so rare to see a team so totally and completely on fire, a bit like watching ayrton senna or muhammad ali. If i remember correctly they hit two wides all game.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Mario on August 12, 2013, 11:53:45 AM
Hurling definitely has an inferiority complex, all you hear from analysts and commentators is how great it is compared to any other sport, during the Sunday Game last night they even compared it with soccer and how much better this was, there is no praise like self praise.

If it was so great it would be more popular than gaelic football and its not, the hurlers would say 'thats because its so skillful only a few can play' but why would that affect the support?

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: pullhard on August 12, 2013, 12:14:01 PM
If it was so great it would be more popular than gaelic football and its not, the hurlers would say 'thats because its so skillful only a few can play' but why would that affect the support?

simple people like simple games, look at gaelic and football fans ;)
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: easytiger95 on August 12, 2013, 12:22:08 PM
Forget snooker or golf - the cricket has been brilliant this summer......


I'm actually serious.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: pullhard on August 12, 2013, 12:39:32 PM
Forget snooker or golf - the cricket has been brilliant this summer......


I'm actually serious.

It actually has been enjoyable. Sky coverage of it is great.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Bingo on August 12, 2013, 12:45:34 PM
I love these topics  ::)

We also due one on professionalism as well due to the high level of these games and the bumper gates to date.

I don't think you can measure what is better or more entertaining etc, everyone to their own and enjoy them for what they are.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: haveaharp on August 12, 2013, 12:48:17 PM
Forget snooker or golf - the cricket has been brilliant this summer......


I'm actually serious.

That paint is still wet. Careful now.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: easytiger95 on August 12, 2013, 04:13:49 PM
Always loved test cricket - first got into it with the West Indies side of the late 80s early 90s - Curtly Ambrose, Courtney Walsh etc. Fell out of following it for a few years but the Ashes 2005 got me back into it - this series is not as good as that year but as mentioned the Sky coverage is first class.

Bringing it back to the hurling v football debate, sport is sport, and for me there is no aesthetic difference between Conor Lehane side stepping for a point, Jack mcCaffrey blasting past wing forwards to set up an attack, or Ian Bell dissecting the Aussie attack for another century - we're just privileged to see these artists doing their thing. Genius.

(though as I speak the Aussies are taking over the 4th test - Warner playing great for a man who usually wears a comedy moustache!)
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Eamonnca1 on August 12, 2013, 04:18:42 PM
Has 20Twenty cricket appeared on TV yet? By all accounts it's huge in India.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: easytiger95 on August 12, 2013, 04:24:35 PM
Yeah the IPL was on ITV4 this summer - I prefer the Tests myself, but a good IPL game will give you a nerve jangling finish - say 40 needed off 24 balls and it goes down to the wire, and then they have an over each to bat in extra time - loads of 4's and 6's. But apparently a lot of those IPL games are fixed.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on August 12, 2013, 04:26:05 PM
20Twenty has been around for a couple of years now. I think the English counties play a T20 Cup or something as well.

I went to a double Wicket tournament in Saint Lucia one time and it was great. All the test nations were playing, the day flew..
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: easytiger95 on August 12, 2013, 04:39:47 PM
Saint Lucia, no less!! Far from Saint Lucia you were raised AZ  ;D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on August 12, 2013, 04:50:02 PM
Saint Lucia, no less!! Far from Saint Lucia you were raised AZ  ;D

You can sing that :D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: pullhard on August 12, 2013, 05:11:25 PM
I was asked my mate to play a game of cricket to make up the numbers. By f**K is a long day out. It’s a bit like American football no set end time.

It’s hard to compare gaelic and hurling, guess its what you grow up with and enjoy. I played both and then focused on the hurling.
One thing I have noticed that during club games of both hurling has a quieter atmosphere, hurling fans don't chat as much s**t during the game. The players as the game is much quicker don’t yell as much for the ball or at each other.

I believe both games shouldn't share the same rule book. There are too different in terms of speed, scoring and contact areas
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on August 12, 2013, 05:12:27 PM
I was asked my mate to play a game of cricket to make up the numbers. By f**K is a long day out. It’s a bit like American football no set end time.

It’s hard to compare gaelic and hurling, guess its what you grow up with and enjoy. I played both and then focused on the hurling.
One thing I have noticed that during club games of both hurling has a quieter atmosphere, hurling fans don't chat as much s**t during the game. The players as the game is much quicker don’t yell as much for the ball or at each other.

I believe both games shouldn't share the same rule book. There are too different in terms of speed, scoring and contact areas

 ???
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: pullhard on August 12, 2013, 05:19:04 PM


 ???
[/quote]

I think cricket might be more interesting and easier to follow.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Eamonnca1 on August 12, 2013, 06:09:27 PM
???

I think he meant to say baseball. That's a relaxing evening out!

Only because hurling and Gaelic football share the same organization do you get this discussion coming up. People sometimes ask me if I can convince college hurlers to take up football. I keep saying they're not interested, and why would they be?  It's like asking a (field) hockey player if he wants to play soccer.  Why would he?  They're two fundamentally different sports. Apples and oranges. Cars and motorbikes. Beans and peas.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: muppet on August 12, 2013, 07:22:13 PM


Funny how when we see a fantastic match in football (Kerry-Galway 08), (Tyrone-Armagh 05), (Mayo- Dublin 06) never does some-one voice the opinion "wasn't it better than seeing the Cats bore their way to an All-Ireland" but when there is a decent hurling match the occasion cannot pass without a "jaysus that was better than a football " comment.

That's an excellent observation.

Ya left out this bit ya bollix  ;D: "Watched the last 10 mins of the Dublin-Mayo semi last year and it was a cracker now that I look back on it."
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: 5 Sams on August 12, 2013, 08:25:44 PM
???

I think he meant to say baseball. That's a relaxing evening out!

Only because hurling and Gaelic football share the same organization do you get this discussion coming up. People sometimes ask me if I can convince college hurlers to take up football. I keep saying they're not interested, and why would they be?  It's like asking a (field) hockey player if he wants to play soccer.  Why would he?  They're two fundamentally different sports. Apples and oranges. Cars and motorbikes. Beans and peas.

+ 1 about the baseball. Went to a few games in The Sky Dome many moons ago. Very enjoyable...beer on tap for 3 or 4 hours while watching a hugely enjoyable game. It was the year the Blue Jays won the World Series. 92? Joe Carter was the man. Helps to have a modicum of understanding of what's going on to get the most from it.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: bennydorano on August 18, 2013, 05:24:24 PM
Well done Clare, with an age profile like that they'll be about for a longtime. Shite game btw.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on August 18, 2013, 05:32:50 PM
Shite game btw.

+1.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Asal Mor on August 18, 2013, 05:39:16 PM
I've seen better but I still thought it was a great game. I don't know how you could watch the skills of Tony Kelly and Paudge Collins and declare it a sh!te game but each to their own.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on August 18, 2013, 05:42:07 PM
Ah it was a poor game to be fair but Clare will definitely give Cork plenty of it.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Whishtup on August 18, 2013, 09:15:30 PM
Thought it was a great game.  Again, if ye wanted to, you could tear it apart for cynical/dirty tackles,blablabla,  etc...but why the hell would ye?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on August 18, 2013, 09:36:00 PM
That's not why I thought it was poor. Limerick were brutal for much of the game and once Clare pulled away mid way through the first half they were never really in trouble so I thought it was a very average game. The amount of wides took the wide out of the game too.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Whishtup on August 18, 2013, 09:39:12 PM
That's not why I thought it was poor. Limerick were brutal for much of the game and once Clare pulled away mid way through the first half they were never really in trouble so I thought it was a very average game. The amount of wides took the wide out of the game too.

My apologies-I was just making a general statement.  I suppose if you look at the shots to wides in Cork Dub game it didn't compare-less space though and plenty of hooks.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: rrhf on August 19, 2013, 09:09:34 AM
Whether it was good, great or shite dosent really matter does it now? Do you think the Man UTD fans were discussing the aesthetic appeal of the game on Saturday evening on their forums. 
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on August 19, 2013, 12:19:15 PM
It was quite boring I thought.
Tony Kelly is a smashing player though.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: GalwayBayBoy on August 19, 2013, 12:34:06 PM
Well done Clare, with an age profile like that they'll be about for a longtime. Shite game btw.

Wasn't a great game as Limerick underperformed quite badly to be honest. Still some great patches of hurling in it.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on August 19, 2013, 12:40:33 PM
It was quite boring I thought.
Tony Kelly is a smashing player though.

Limerick not turning up certainly didn't help the game as a contest, but some of the skills on display for the Clare lads was unreal and that in itself is entertainment in my eyes. Tony Kelly's point was fantastic.

When Spain handed Ireland and numerous others their arsés on a plate, a contest it wasn't but the joy comes from watching skilled performers is still to be admired.


I'm not the biggest football fan in the world, but the few games I've watched this summer have been entertaining in their own ways, Galway v Cork, Cork v Dublin, Down v Derry (the first time) and even Mayo v Donegal.

Not sure about thon Cricket though.   8)
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Asal Mor on August 19, 2013, 12:45:31 PM

Limerick not turning up certainly didn't help the game as a contest, but some of the skills on display for the Clare lads was unreal and that in itself is entertainment in my eyes. Tony Kelly's point was fantastic.

When Spain handed Ireland and numerous others their arsés on a plate, a contest it wasn't but the joy comes from watching skilled performers is still to be admired.

+1
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Aristo 60 on August 19, 2013, 04:16:54 PM
As always when played in the right way the game of hurling is hard to surpass and i am a out and out football man who never played hurling.
You watch the dublin cork game on tv and it is easily better for spectators than anything the football has produced this year.

Just booked tickets for Limerick & Clare...my first big hurling game, so hoping for a good one.

Well I'm back safe from Dublin, thanks for asking everyone.

I enjoyed the two matches well enough but I must admit at one stage during the minor match I was looking forward to the football in the next game!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: blanketattack on August 19, 2013, 04:18:41 PM
One thing that I always find odd is how come if hurling is such an amazing sport and so entertaining and is the best game in the world, how come outside of All-Ireland finals, no hurling game has sold out Croke Park in living memory? This can't be blamed on the recession either as there were no sell-outs during the Celtic Tiger either (besides AI-finals).
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on August 19, 2013, 04:50:04 PM
I've seen better but I still thought it was a great game. I don't know how you could watch the skills of Tony Kelly and Paudge Collins and declare it a sh!te game but each to their own.

Thought it was a great game.  Again, if ye wanted to, you could tear it apart for cynical/dirty tackles,blablabla,  etc...but why the hell would ye?

Ah lads, it really wasn't.
But that's ok.
You can still enjoy it without it having to be a great game.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: pullhard on August 19, 2013, 05:17:12 PM
Some bitterness here. From the impression I get most of the hurling lads have played a bit of Gaelic, whereas most of the Gaelic boys have never held a hurl in anger. Perhaps they should get involved, in other to form a more balance view…

But this arguement that we dont really need. As its comparing two different beasts
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Whishtup on August 19, 2013, 06:48:52 PM
I've seen better but I still thought it was a great game. I don't know how you could watch the skills of Tony Kelly and Paudge Collins and declare it a sh!te game but each to their own.

Thought it was a great game.  Again, if ye wanted to, you could tear it apart for cynical/dirty tackles,blablabla,  etc...but why the hell would ye?


Ah lads, it really wasn't.
But that's ok.
You can still enjoy it without it having to be a great game.

A culmination of things about this game made it great for me-the Limerick support, Clare's young hurlers finally coming through, Davy Fitz lepping about like a mad yoke, John Allen's humility after the match, even when faced with these new cheap,  hateful questions that post match reporters are fond of asking, the commentary, the analysis.  A breath of fresh air. 
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: armaghniac on August 19, 2013, 07:30:28 PM
Has any football game not involving Dublin, other than the final, sold out in Crime Park. The attendance at Sunday'd game was very respectable.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Redhand Santa on August 19, 2013, 08:11:41 PM
Has any football game not involving Dublin, other than the final, sold out in Crime Park. The attendance at Sunday'd game was very respectable.

Not sure about sold out but I'd say a few have come close. Armagh Donegal semi in 2003 had over 75,000 at it. The quarter final double header that year of Tyrone Fermanagh Armagh Laois also had something similar from memory.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Sidney on August 20, 2013, 12:38:42 AM
One thing that I always find odd is how come if hurling is such an amazing sport and so entertaining and is the best game in the world, how come outside of All-Ireland finals, no hurling game has sold out Croke Park in living memory? This can't be blamed on the recession either as there were no sell-outs during the Celtic Tiger either (besides AI-finals).
Why has the Munster hurling championship always consistently attracted higher attendances than the Ulster football championship? And it isn't the size of the stadiums, because Ulster football matches very rarely sell out.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on August 20, 2013, 10:37:51 AM
I've seen better but I still thought it was a great game. I don't know how you could watch the skills of Tony Kelly and Paudge Collins and declare it a sh!te game but each to their own.

Thought it was a great game.  Again, if ye wanted to, you could tear it apart for cynical/dirty tackles,blablabla,  etc...but why the hell would ye?


Ah lads, it really wasn't.
But that's ok.
You can still enjoy it without it having to be a great game.

A culmination of things about this game made it great for me-the Limerick support, Clare's young hurlers finally coming through, Davy Fitz lepping about like a mad yoke, John Allen's humility after the match, even when faced with these new cheap,  hateful questions that post match reporters are fond of asking, the commentary, the analysis.  A breath of fresh air.

So you're basically saying, it doesn't have to be a great game, in order for it to be a 'great game'.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on September 22, 2013, 05:15:01 PM
Thank fcuk we have another hurling final to look forward to after that muck that was on today.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on September 22, 2013, 06:16:35 PM
Damn right
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: DuffleKing on September 22, 2013, 08:24:20 PM

Yawn

 I was at hurling championship final recently and it was a glorified hockey match - the worst excuse for a field sport i ever had to endure. Which is the true reflection?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on September 28, 2013, 06:23:09 PM
Dare i even say anything, another clinker the day again
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on September 28, 2013, 06:30:50 PM
WHAT.A.F U C K I N G.GAME.  ;D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on September 28, 2013, 06:37:03 PM
Great to see the Roscommon hurlers doing so well.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Club Rossa on September 28, 2013, 06:41:36 PM
Mickey Harte won't be impressed with the lack of defensive play :P
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: 5 Sams on September 28, 2013, 07:44:59 PM
I have to say that some of the skill I saw today was unbelievable. There used to be a poster on here called First Touch Joe Cooney (FTJC). Some of the first touches today were unreal.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: DuffleKing on September 28, 2013, 08:13:33 PM

Apart from the cork inside forwards
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Sidney on September 28, 2013, 10:27:17 PM
In Davy "El Loco" Fitzgerald, hurling possesses the greatest character in Irish sport.

What a day, and the €10 above face value I paid for a Canal End ticket five minutes before the throw in was SO worth it.

Viva the Baby Banner, and viva la revolucion.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: BartSimpson on September 28, 2013, 10:46:02 PM
Best gamne in the world. Brilliant stuff. tryin to watch MOTD now and im bored.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on September 28, 2013, 10:48:24 PM
In Davy "El Loco" Fitzgerald, hurling possesses the greatest character in Irish sport.

What a day, and the €10 above face value I paid for a Canal End ticket five minutes before the throw in was SO worth it.

Viva the Baby Banner, and viva la revolucion.

Tut tut.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jell 0 Biafra on September 29, 2013, 01:32:30 AM
What a match.  Cracking stuff.

The missus just started watching the hurling this year.  Trying to explain to her just how lucky she is.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on February 23, 2014, 03:30:55 PM
Again hurling games like this are unmissable,
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on February 23, 2014, 03:47:04 PM
The funny thing is when football delivers games like this there is always a significant number of people who complain about the lack of defending. A high scoring hurling game is always lauded as a great game while a high scoring football can be derided for a lack of defending. Football can't win sometimes.

Today's game was excellent but you'd really have to wonder where the defenders were!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on February 23, 2014, 04:10:52 PM
10 goals would tend to say both full back line were a tad awol
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on June 22, 2014, 07:39:46 PM
Bump.
Kilkenny Galway was excellent today.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on June 22, 2014, 10:13:31 PM
Another serious game of hurling the day before Kilkenny started to pull clear, you couldn't have made up the last 5 minutes, with 2 of the games greatest hurlers scoring at the death!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: From the Bunker on June 22, 2014, 10:37:26 PM
Have you ever seen a good hurling game involving Fermanagh, Tyrone, Armagh, Monaghan, Cavan, Donegal, Mayo, Sligo, Leitrim, Roscommon, Longford, Louth, Meath or Kildare? Have you ever seen a good football game involving any of those counties?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on June 22, 2014, 11:21:40 PM
Have you ever seen a good hurling game involving Fermanagh, Tyrone, Armagh, Monaghan, Cavan, Donegal, Mayo, Sligo, Leitrim, Roscommon, Longford, Louth, Meath or Kildare? Have you ever seen a good football game involving any of those counties?

Meath and Kildare would be of a very high standard (second tier), all the other teams would be of a similar standard to themselves and would throw up a good game, Armagh and Louth would be a good game, while the quality may not be the same as the top tier it would certainly be exciting
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: moysider on June 23, 2014, 12:24:38 AM
The funny thing is when football delivers games like this there is always a significant number of people who complain about the lack of defending. A high scoring hurling game is always lauded as a great game while a high scoring football can be derided for a lack of defending. Football can't win sometimes.

Today's game was excellent but you'd really have to wonder where the defenders were!

I don t watch hurling much these days but today s finish was class it has to be said.

But why people compare hurling and football is beyond me. Lacrosse and American football anybody? Baseball and basketball?

Chalk and cheese.

As regards discipline. Imagine if all those early rows, bullying and dirty digs happened in a football match. Hurlers can do it right in front of the ref too and know they ll usually get a finger wag and unless they really push their luck they wont even get a yellow.

As regards scores in hurling. I m sure I came across a proposal from Christy Ring that hurling would be a goals-only game, with player numbers being reduced to maybe 13?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on June 23, 2014, 12:42:11 AM
Actually highlighted how easy it is to score a goal in hurling.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on June 23, 2014, 07:21:41 AM
Have you ever seen a good hurling game involving Fermanagh, Tyrone, Armagh, Monaghan, Cavan, Donegal, Mayo, Sligo, Leitrim, Roscommon, Longford, Louth, Meath or Kildare? Have you ever seen a good football game involving any of those counties?

There were a few alright
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kE_maOQWTOk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mftE3kDIYBk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIV73ywp41o
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: blast05 on June 23, 2014, 05:36:38 PM
Quote
But why people compare hurling and football is beyond me

Seriously ?? You're smarter than that.
Tis the aul inferiority complex - pure and simple !!

"Wouldn't cross the road to watch a game of football" .... or translated as 'why oh why dear God is it that only 6 or 7 counties take hurling seriously and everybody seems to take football seriously. So ask not what hurling can do for me but what i can do for hurling .... i'll talk that feckin' bogball down at any opportunity'

"Golf ? Sure golf is only Protestant hurling" .... or translated as 'i tried that golf crack once but i was laughed out of the place when the ball was whacking off the roof at the driving range with me hurling swing'

"Hurling, the most skilfull game on earth" .... usually roared by a lad from Tipp, Clare or Limerick after about 7 pints when watching one of his county men on the Sunday Game that evening after a match when said county match does something special. The intention is to roar loudly enough so that the circle of hurling areas in the 3 counties that the lads is visualising (on a map) in his head expands and breaks down barriers into the barren wastelands of football in Kerry, west Clare and North and west Galway

and on and on and on.....

Me ..... hurling is a great sport and i like watching an odd game and as an Irish man i'm proud of it. I prefer football though.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on June 23, 2014, 08:19:37 PM
Quote
But why people compare hurling and football is beyond me

Seriously ?? You're smarter than that.
Tis the aul inferiority complex - pure and simple !!

"Wouldn't cross the road to watch a game of football" .... or translated as 'why oh why dear God is it that only 6 or 7 counties take hurling seriously and everybody seems to take football seriously. So ask not what hurling can do for me but what i can do for hurling .... i'll talk that feckin' bogball down at any opportunity'

"Golf ? Sure golf is only Protestant hurling" .... or translated as 'i tried that golf crack once but i was laughed out of the place when the ball was whacking off the roof at the driving range with me hurling swing'

"Hurling, the most skilfull game on earth" .... usually roared by a lad from Tipp, Clare or Limerick after about 7 pints when watching one of his county men on the Sunday Game that evening after a match when said county match does something special. The intention is to roar loudly enough so that the circle of hurling areas in the 3 counties that the lads is visualising (on a map) in his head expands and breaks down barriers into the barren wastelands of football in Kerry, west Clare and North and west Galway

and on and on and on.....

Me ..... hurling is a great sport and i like watching an odd game and as an Irish man i'm proud of it. I prefer football though.

Name me 6 or 7 counties that actually take football seriously? It's the same faces every year in the semis, and prior to the back door it was even less teams.  But hey its a completely different sport and it's like someone comparing cricket over rugby ffs
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Redhand Santa on June 23, 2014, 08:40:37 PM
I'd say in the last 15 there's been a lot of counties made it to the semi finals in the football. Off the top of my head the following have:
Tyrone
Armagh
Derry
Donegal
Fermanagh
Down
Dublin
Meath
Kildare
Cork
Kerry
Mayo
Galway

On top of that Monaghan have won an Ulster title, Westmeath have won a Leinster, and Sligo and Roscommon have won a Connaught.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on June 23, 2014, 08:48:04 PM
I'd say in the last 15 there's been a lot of counties made it to the semi finals in the football. Off the top of my head the following have:
Tyrone
Armagh
Derry
Donegal
Fermanagh
Down
Dublin
Meath
Kildare
Cork
Kerry
Mayo
Galway

On top of that Monaghan have won an Ulster title, Westmeath have won a Leinster, and Sligo and Roscommon have won a Connaught.

Outta that who have won? Just off the top of you're head? Kerry, Cork, Dublin, Tyrone?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on June 23, 2014, 08:53:46 PM
My point is, in all sports you have counties or countries that dominate, others come and go but generally 3 or 4 counties/countries in a sport will always be there or thereabouts.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Redhand Santa on June 23, 2014, 08:56:06 PM
In the last 15 years Tyrone, Armagh, Donegal, Dublin, Meath, Kerry, Galway and Cork.  So since 1999 that's 8 winners.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on June 23, 2014, 08:57:53 PM
In the last 15 years Tyrone, Armagh, Donegal, Dublin, Meath, Kerry, Galway and Cork.  So since 1999 that's 8 winners.

And when will Armagh, Tyrone, Meath and heaven help me Galway!! (fecking we beat them ffs) win their next?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Redhand Santa on June 23, 2014, 09:03:15 PM
In the last 15 years Tyrone, Armagh, Donegal, Dublin, Meath, Kerry, Galway and Cork.  So since 1999 that's 8 winners.

And when will Armagh, Tyrone, Meath and heaven help me Galway!! (fecking we beat them ffs) win their next?

Who knows - these things can turn round very quick. Donegal in 2010 were lucky to be a top 15 team in Ireland. By 2012 they were champs. Galway have won u21 all irelands in recent years and have a habit of coming from know where. Football has a large number of competitive counties.

I just remembered even Wexford made it to a semi final in 08 and ran the eventual champions close. On top of the 8 winners in the last 15 years Mayo have played and got close in multiple finals and Down made it to the 2010 final only getting beat by a point in the final.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on June 23, 2014, 09:05:41 PM
My point is and don't get lost on it, 6/7 counties take it seriously in Hurling and football, generally and you can look at the stats, Kerry on 36 and Dublin on 24 it usually follows this format.

I've a preference for hurling because I play it and I played football and enjoyed it also, but as a spectacle for me entertainment wise I prefer it over the defensive football nowadays

Oh and Galway last won it 16 years ago ;)

As for competitive that's fine, but facts tell us that they  don't win
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on June 23, 2014, 09:16:07 PM
My point is and don't get lost on it, 6/7 counties take it seriously in Hurling and football, generally and you can look at the stats, Kerry on 36 and Dublin on 24 it usually follows this format.

I've a preference for hurling because I play it and I played football and enjoyed it also, but as a spectacle for me entertainment wise I prefer it over the defensive football nowadays

Oh and Galway last won it 16 years ago ;)

As for competitive that's fine, but facts tell us that they  don't win
They won it in 2001 as well.
A lot of people think Meath won that year because they beat Kerry in the semifinal.
Ask Hardy or Jinxy who won in 2001

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on June 23, 2014, 09:21:19 PM
We weren't taking football seriously that year.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on June 23, 2014, 09:28:34 PM
My point is and don't get lost on it, 6/7 counties take it seriously in Hurling and football, generally and you can look at the stats, Kerry on 36 and Dublin on 24 it usually follows this format.

I've a preference for hurling because I play it and I played football and enjoyed it also, but as a spectacle for me entertainment wise I prefer it over the defensive football nowadays

Oh and Galway last won it 16 years ago ;)

As for competitive that's fine, but facts tell us that they  don't win
They won it in 2001 as well.
A lot of people think Meath won that year because they beat Kerry in the semifinal.
Ask Hardy or Jinxy who won in 2001

Aye right enough, that was a tremendous final in fairness, the second half performance from Galway was great
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Redhand Santa on June 23, 2014, 09:31:50 PM
Given that there is no transfer market counties will come and go in Gaelic. It's not that counties don't take it seriously it's just that most aren't good enough at any one time. Football is much more competitive than hurling generally and the facts speak for itself. How long would you have to go back to find 8 winners of the hurling all Ireland?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Fionntamhnach on June 23, 2014, 09:36:27 PM
Tyrone didn't take football seriously before 2003!  :P
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on June 23, 2014, 09:37:18 PM
Given that there is no transfer market ...

How come  Conor Mortimer is playing at No. 10 for Antrim against his own county there on RTE? He's doin' OK, in fairness.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on June 23, 2014, 09:42:14 PM
Given that there is no transfer market counties will come and go in Gaelic. It's not that counties don't take it seriously it's just that most aren't good enough at any one time. Football is much more competitive than hurling generally and the facts speak for itself. How long would you have to go back to find 8 winners of the hurling all Ireland?

There has been 6 since 98, and that's because they put more effort into it than the rest. And as far as I know no real transfer market in hurling so your point is also relative to hurling but stick in the facts speak for itself is not really true.

Point of the thread is (basically) that hurling is a better spectacle than football, at the weekend it was, next week it may be different and a football game may give us a ending like tha
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: moysider on June 24, 2014, 01:06:51 AM
In the last 15 years Tyrone, Armagh, Donegal, Dublin, Meath, Kerry, Galway and Cork.  So since 1999 that's 8 winners.

And when will Armagh, Tyrone, Meath and heaven help me Galway!! (fecking we beat them ffs) win their next?

And Mayo have been in more finals than the rest put together ( and could well lose another this year because we ;D can t win one) and when will we win our next?! ;D ;D

 
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: delgany on June 24, 2014, 07:12:37 AM
Sure there's never a cynical foul in hurling,  no need for a black card lads.......sure the kilkenny back was just being sporting giving galway that last minute penalty...with the rugby tackle......where are you now ...joe brolly!  Ach sure there's only a point in it ...let's play on to galway have a chance to equalise....were deep in additional time....never mind !!! Not a mention from the pundits....it was a truly outstanding game!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on June 24, 2014, 09:57:53 AM
Sure there's never a cynical foul in hurling,  no need for a black card lads.......sure the kilkenny back was just being sporting giving galway that last minute penalty...with the rugby tackle......where are you now ...joe brolly!  Ach sure there's only a point in it ...let's play on to galway have a chance to equalise....were deep in additional time....never mind !!! Not a mention from the pundits....it was a truly outstanding game!

There was two minutes added time, Henry scored on 71.57 and Joe scored 72.19 but sure don't let that cloud your memory of what was an outstanding finish. Yes a black would have been required for that tackle and there wouldn't have been a soul complaining about it. Seems it may be coming in for hurling, I don't think it will be an issue though, seems to be working well in football. But I'll say it again, two different sports can't compare them. Hurling was (this weekend) better than what the football served up
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on June 24, 2014, 10:03:45 AM
Sure there's never a cynical foul in hurling,  no need for a black card lads.......sure the kilkenny back was just being sporting giving galway that last minute penalty...with the rugby tackle......where are you now ...joe brolly!  Ach sure there's only a point in it ...let's play on to galway have a chance to equalise....were deep in additional time....never mind !!! Not a mention from the pundits....it was a truly outstanding game!

There was two minutes added time, Henry scored on 71.57 and Joe scored 72.19 but sure don't let that cloud your memory of what was an outstanding finish. Yes a black would have been required for that tackle and there wouldn't have been a soul complaining about it. Seems it may be coming in for hurling, I don't think it will be an issue though, seems to be working well in football. But I'll say it again, two different sports can't compare them. Hurling was (this weekend) better than what the football served up
It is most weekends.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: DuffleKing on June 24, 2014, 10:31:49 AM

Thought this thread was going to be about Kilkenny Vs Offaly
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on June 24, 2014, 10:33:01 AM
Leave us out of this! And we'd bate them in the football. Probably.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on June 24, 2014, 10:41:38 AM
My point is and don't get lost on it, 6/7 counties take it seriously in Hurling and football, generally and you can look at the stats, Kerry on 36 and Dublin on 24 it usually follows this format.

I've a preference for hurling because I play it and I played football and enjoyed it also, but as a spectacle for me entertainment wise I prefer it over the defensive football nowadays

Oh and Galway last won it 16 years ago ;)

As for competitive that's fine, but facts tell us that they  don't win
They won it in 2001 as well.
A lot of people think Meath won that year because they beat Kerry in the semifinal.
Ask Hardy or Jinxy who won in 2001

I don't remember anything that happened before or after September 11th that year.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on June 24, 2014, 10:49:52 AM
My point is and don't get lost on it, 6/7 counties take it seriously in Hurling and football, generally and you can look at the stats, Kerry on 36 and Dublin on 24 it usually follows this format.

I've a preference for hurling because I play it and I played football and enjoyed it also, but as a spectacle for me entertainment wise I prefer it over the defensive football nowadays

Oh and Galway last won it 16 years ago ;)

As for competitive that's fine, but facts tell us that they  don't win
They won it in 2001 as well.
A lot of people think Meath won that year because they beat Kerry in the semifinal.
Ask Hardy or Jinxy who won in 2001

I don't remember anything that happened before or after September 11th that year.
I remember being in Croke Park and Colm O rourke at half time over the PA  telling the Meath full back line that it would be more profitable to drop the fuball and put up a hotel and an apartment block on the site.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on June 24, 2014, 12:49:21 PM

Thought this thread was going to be about Kilkenny Vs Offaly

As long as it's not about Armagh hurling ;)
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: DuffleKing on June 24, 2014, 01:34:09 PM

Thought this thread was going to be about Kilkenny Vs Offaly

As long as it's not about Armagh hurling ;)

Or Antrim hurling....

If we're comparing like with like, does Antrim Hurling put Antrim football in the shade?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on June 24, 2014, 02:41:35 PM

Thought this thread was going to be about Kilkenny Vs Offaly

As long as it's not about Armagh hurling ;)

Or Antrim hurling....

If we're comparing like with like, does Antrim Hurling put Antrim football in the shade?

Div 4 football Div 1 b hurling, now I would tend to believe you have some sense.......? Is it a big difference? Possibly. Would Armagh football put Armagh hurling in the shade? Course they do because like Antrim their county board could not give a shite about it's poorer cousin if truth be told
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on June 24, 2014, 03:51:09 PM
Sure there's never a cynical foul in hurling,  no need for a black card lads.......sure the kilkenny back was just being sporting giving galway that last minute penalty...with the rugby tackle......where are you now ...joe brolly!  Ach sure there's only a point in it ...let's play on to galway have a chance to equalise....were deep in additional time....never mind !!! Not a mention from the pundits....it was a truly outstanding game!
If that had been a football game it would have been 10 aside by half time.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on June 24, 2014, 03:52:52 PM
Sure there's never a cynical foul in hurling,  no need for a black card lads.......sure the kilkenny back was just being sporting giving galway that last minute penalty...with the rugby tackle......where are you now ...joe brolly!  Ach sure there's only a point in it ...let's play on to galway have a chance to equalise....were deep in additional time....never mind !!! Not a mention from the pundits....it was a truly outstanding game!
If that had been a football game it would have been 10 aside by half time.

Because of all the diving the footballers do now when roughed up?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on July 06, 2014, 05:33:03 PM
In the interest of fairness, both those games on RTE were the biggest pile of shite.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: From the Bunker on July 06, 2014, 05:38:59 PM
In the interest of fairness, both those games on RTE were the biggest pile of shite.

Yeah, but the analysis on both games did not reflect this! :P
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on July 06, 2014, 06:00:12 PM
First time all summer sky got the luck of the draw. Sky will fall into the Clare Wexford trap now though.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on September 07, 2014, 05:00:17 PM
That was absolutely fantastic..
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zip Code on September 07, 2014, 05:02:59 PM
Brilliant! 
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on September 07, 2014, 05:07:29 PM
Three replays in a row. Even Liam O'Neill might manage a smile now.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on September 07, 2014, 05:08:37 PM
Stupidest decision ever nearly decided the AIF. If it was football they'd be talking about nothing else.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on September 07, 2014, 05:09:42 PM
Stupidest decision ever nearly decided the AIF. If it was football they'd be talking about nothing else.

He turned the shoulder into the marker. It was the right decision.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on September 07, 2014, 05:10:41 PM
You must have been watching the cartoons or something. He tried to sidestep the defender and was floored.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: bennydorano on September 07, 2014, 05:12:03 PM
My immediate reaction was charging.

Also, nearly as good as a game of Football.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on September 07, 2014, 05:14:31 PM
Nearly as good as Kerry-Mayo in spots.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: bcarrier on September 07, 2014, 05:17:31 PM
Correct decision at end IMO.

Penalty situation a bit of a joke.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on September 07, 2014, 05:18:55 PM
Correct decision at end IMO.

Penalty situation a bit of a joke.

Why?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Denn Forever on September 07, 2014, 05:23:11 PM
Off to watch the Soccer now.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Dinny Breen on September 07, 2014, 05:23:31 PM
Correct decision at end IMO.

Penalty situation a bit of a joke.

Why?

Outside the box? new rule in the middle of championship rewards foul play?

Thought he was charging myself.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on September 07, 2014, 05:27:25 PM
Off to watch the Soccer now.
One of the greatest matches on the biggest day of the GAA calendar and now a soccer match to watch.
If Carlsberg did Sundays.....
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: BluestackBoy on September 07, 2014, 05:27:41 PM
Stupidest decision ever nearly decided the AIF. If it was football they'd be talking about nothing else.

He turned the shoulder into the marker. It was the right decision.

Agreed
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on September 07, 2014, 05:31:59 PM
Correct decision at end IMO.

Penalty situation a bit of a joke.

Why?

Outside the box? new rule in the middle of championship rewards foul play?

Thought he was charging myself.

I thought the situation before the change was the joke. A penalty was supposed to be taken from 20 metres but lads were hitting the ball from 13 metres. For me, today's two penalties (both dubious) were badly taken.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: BluestackBoy on September 07, 2014, 05:37:22 PM
Correct decision at end IMO.

Penalty situation a bit of a joke.

Why?

Outside the box? new rule in the middle of championship rewards foul play?

Thought he was charging myself.

I thought the situation before the change was the joke. A penalty was supposed to be taken from 20 metres but lads were hitting the ball from 13 metres. For me, today's two penalties (both dubious) were badly taken.

Tipperary would have been better off without the penalty awards as they would have had 2 easy points wheras they ended up with nothing from the penalties.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Dinny Breen on September 07, 2014, 05:38:19 PM
If a penalty is to be taken 20m out would it not be fairer to have only the goalie on the line? To me it now favours the defending team and that can't be right.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: bcarrier on September 07, 2014, 07:08:01 PM
If a penalty is to be taken 20m out would it not be fairer to have only the goalie on the line? To me it now favours the defending team and that can't be right.

agreed.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: easytiger95 on September 07, 2014, 07:15:32 PM
I think it would be fairer if your trailing foot has to be on or behind the line when the sliotar is struck - the new methods are impeding the guy's run up and therefore they are not able to strike fully through it. Although maybe it was perspective on the screen, but I don't think either guy used the full 5 metres - I thought it would have been better to sacrifice proximity for a cleaner strike.

As for the last foul, during live play I was convinced Hogan was done, but the replay shows Maher has planted himself and Hogan does turn the shoulder, without changing his direction. Very physical hit from Maher, but on balance, I think the ref got it right. Thought the two penos were both fouls outside the box though.

Fabulous game - even better than last year's two games I thought - just more physical and evenly matched, whereas I thought Cork were blessed both day's last year to be within spitting distance of Clare.

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Dangleberrys on September 07, 2014, 07:28:01 PM
If a penalty is to be taken 20m out would it not be fairer to have only the goalie on the line? To me it now favours the defending team and that can't be right.
Maybe award 2points from a penalty when it goes over the bar. Still have chance for 3 but guaranteed 2 if taken...
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on September 07, 2014, 07:32:10 PM

I thought the situation before the change was the joke. A penalty was supposed to be taken from 20 metres but lads were hitting the ball from 13 metres. For me, today's two penalties (both dubious) were badly taken.

+1.
Exciting game esp the ending but give me a good football game any day.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on September 07, 2014, 07:34:45 PM

I thought the situation before the change was the joke. A penalty was supposed to be taken from 20 metres but lads were hitting the ball from 13 metres. For me, today's two penalties (both dubious) were badly taken.

+1.
Exciting game esp the ending but give me a good football game any day.
As rare as hens teeth.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on September 07, 2014, 07:37:45 PM

I thought the situation before the change was the joke. A penalty was supposed to be taken from 20 metres but lads were hitting the ball from 13 metres. For me, today's two penalties (both dubious) were badly taken.

+1.
Exciting game esp the ending but give me a good football game any day.
As rare as hens teeth.

Seemingly not.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on September 07, 2014, 10:39:04 PM
Mighty game of hurling the day, after a poor year overall for hurling, very very few wides and the game was of the highest standard, I wonder will wexford take note giving the wides tally they clock up during a game
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Nigel White on September 07, 2014, 10:49:51 PM
I think Tipp had 3 wides in the whole match. That's some achievement
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on September 07, 2014, 10:52:30 PM
I think Tipp had 3 wides in the whole match. That's some achievement

With two penalty misses on top of that it was the worth of nine wides though.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on September 07, 2014, 10:52:44 PM
Mighty game of hurling the day, after a poor year overall for hurling, very very few wides and the gaem was of the highest standard, I wonder will wexford take note giving the wides tally they clock up during a game
You think it was a poor year??
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on September 07, 2014, 10:57:10 PM
I thought compared to the past few years it was poor enough, a few of the limerick games were good, Clare and wexford were the standouts before today, but that game had alot of wides and was night and day with today games. I nearly say that was one of the greatest games ever but the defenders on both teams seemed overwhelmed by the forwards, 9 wides in the entire game is serious going, the dubs clocked that up in the last 15mins last week lol
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on September 07, 2014, 11:18:05 PM
All in the eye of the beholder.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Asal Mor on September 08, 2014, 06:42:49 AM
Thought the two penos were both fouls outside the box though.

They were outside, but it's a  problem that defenders are just pulling down attackers who are running through on goal  and not even attempting a legitimate tackle. They were two professional fouls(for the want of a better term) and there needs to be a proper punishment for those kinds of fouls. One man on the line for a penalty would help for fouls inside the box but it will still pay to drag down the man before he gets into the box.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: manfromdelmonte on September 08, 2014, 08:03:36 AM
Two badly hit penalties.
Defenders allowed off the line.

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on September 08, 2014, 10:37:11 AM
Thought the two penos were both fouls outside the box though.

They were outside, but it's a  problem that defenders are just pulling down attackers who are running through on goal  and not even attempting a legitimate tackle. They were two professional fouls(for the want of a better term) and there needs to be a proper punishment for those kinds of fouls. One man on the line for a penalty would help for fouls inside the box but it will still pay to drag down the man before he gets into the box.

Seemingly it's against God's Law to have a black card in hurling because we're told by "hurlingmen" that there's no cynicism in their game.
And of course Refs can't send off anyone from a Big County. :-\
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on September 08, 2014, 11:52:54 AM
Two great sports lads. Can we not leave it at that?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Sidney on September 08, 2014, 11:56:24 AM
Fitting that the inter-county season should once again finish with the more important final.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: screenexile on September 08, 2014, 12:05:27 PM
Two great sports lads. Can we not leave it at that?

I don't get this... at the top level both sports are great. Why do the hurling/football fraternity have to keep saying "ours is better">???
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on September 08, 2014, 12:07:02 PM
It's all a bit 'needy' if you ask me.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Sidney on September 08, 2014, 12:13:39 PM
It's all a bit 'needy' if you ask me.
There's nothing needy about it. It's an assertion of rightful superiority.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Dinny Breen on September 08, 2014, 12:27:41 PM
Thought the two penos were both fouls outside the box though.

They were outside, but it's a  problem that defenders are just pulling down attackers who are running through on goal  and not even attempting a legitimate tackle. They were two professional fouls(for the want of a better term) and there needs to be a proper punishment for those kinds of fouls. One man on the line for a penalty would help for fouls inside the box but it will still pay to drag down the man before he gets into the box.

Seemingly it's against God's Law to have a black card in hurling because we're told by "hurlingmen" that there's no cynicism in their game.
And of course Refs can't send off anyone from a Big County. :-\

They just need to watch the Kilkenny minors.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on September 08, 2014, 12:38:16 PM
Two great sports lads. Can we not leave it at that?

Sure where would the fun be in that?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on September 08, 2014, 12:41:48 PM
Two great sports lads. Can we not leave it at that?

I don't get this... at the top level both sports are great. Why do the hurling/football fraternity have to keep saying "ours is better">???

With respect to true hurling fans we do acknowledge the greatness of both  games. Have a look through twitter on the hurling final and you will find its those who are new to both games are making the comparisions between both codes and calling hurling better.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Sidney on September 08, 2014, 12:52:34 PM
Two great sports lads. Can we not leave it at that?

I don't get this... at the top level both sports are great. Why do the hurling/football fraternity have to keep saying "ours is better">???
We true hurling men prefer to call ourselves "the hurling firmament".
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on September 08, 2014, 01:00:17 PM
The Hurlinginati I thought?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on September 08, 2014, 01:03:28 PM
Two great sports lads. Can we not leave it at that?

I don't get this... at the top level both sports are great. Why do the hurling/football fraternity have to keep saying "ours is better">???
We true hurling men prefer to call ourselves "the hurling firmament".

There you go, I never knew that about you Sydney!

What ya think could Brian Cody lead Europe to Ryder cup glory?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Greenabovethered on September 08, 2014, 01:27:38 PM
Any news on where the reply is going to be? Portlaois?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Sidney on September 08, 2014, 01:29:38 PM

There you go, I never knew that about you Sydney!

What ya think could Brian Cody lead Europe to Ryder cup glory?
Brian Cody v Tom Watson would be a sporting confrontation for the ages. I've no doubt Cody would lead Europe to glory, but unfortunately he has the small matter of a replay to plan for.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on September 08, 2014, 01:31:58 PM
He'd give all week saying that the USA were a 'serious' team.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Sidney on September 08, 2014, 01:36:40 PM
He'd give all week saying that the USA were a 'serious' team.
And when Europe had beaten the Yanks 27-1 he'd be saying it was the toughest Ryder Cup Europe had ever won.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Dinny Breen on September 08, 2014, 01:38:09 PM
He'd give all week saying that the USA were a 'serious' team.

Aye flying in training.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: magpie seanie on September 08, 2014, 02:29:03 PM
Why is it so seasy to get a hurling final ticket and football final tickets are like gold dust? Makes a balls out of trying to swap hurling tickets for football ones.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on September 08, 2014, 02:42:29 PM
Why is it so seasy to get a hurling final ticket and football final tickets are like gold dust? Makes a balls out of trying to swap hurling tickets for football ones.

Less interest of course. Football is simply the more popular sport by a large margin.

I don't think hurling final for football final is a straight swap in terms of their real world value and most people wanting to trade away football tickets realise that, for better or worse. Probably makes them less likely to be open to randomly swapping too, at worst they'll probably know someone who'd love to go.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Sidney on September 08, 2014, 02:46:47 PM

Less interest of course. Football is simply the more popular sport by a large margin.

Westlife are more popular than The War On Drugs*.

*The band, not the US Government policy.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on September 08, 2014, 02:48:45 PM
American football puts fuball in the shade.
But hurling is more like ying to fuball's yang
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on September 08, 2014, 02:59:42 PM
He'd give all week saying that the USA were a 'serious' team.
And when Europe had beaten the Yanks 27-1 he'd be saying it was the toughest Ryder Cup Europe had ever won.
Would he be allowed to wear his Glanbia cap though..
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on September 08, 2014, 03:01:59 PM
Why is it so seasy to get a hurling final ticket and football final tickets are like gold dust? Makes a balls out of trying to swap hurling tickets for football ones.

Simple answer

Population Tipp and KK= 250,000
Population Donegal + Kerry= 310,000

When Cork and Clare played last year ther was a massive shortage of tickets. New teams will always bring a new following and renewed interest as with Clare last year and Donegal this year. It doesnt mean the games will be any better though. Are you trying to make out there was some sort of lack of interest in yesterdays match?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on September 08, 2014, 03:05:59 PM
Its the same every year. The neutral 'die hard' interest is always greater in Football than Hurling.  The participation rates would tell you that Football is more popular than Hurling.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on September 08, 2014, 03:21:48 PM
Why is it so seasy to get a hurling final ticket and football final tickets are like gold dust? Makes a balls out of trying to swap hurling tickets for football ones.

Simple answer

Population Tipp and KK= 250,000
Population Donegal + Kerry= 310,000

When Cork and Clare played last year ther was a massive shortage of tickets. New teams will always bring a new following and renewed interest as with Clare last year and Donegal this year. It doesnt mean the games will be any better though. Are you trying to make out there was some sort of lack of interest in yesterdays match?

There did seem to be less interest (not sure that's the right word though) in yesterday's final with returned tickets from the competing counties which is highly unusual.

This whole discussion is tiresome, it's entirely subjective so there's no right answer. It's usually the hurling crowd who start this but I noticed a number of the football pundits who took the opportunity last week to use the football semi finals as a stick to beat hurling. Padraig Joyce said something like football needed that to get back on top (or along those lines) which I found very annoying. The sports shouldn't be in competition, no more than they should be in competition with any other sport. They are what they are, often brilliant, sometimes rubbish but always interesting.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on September 08, 2014, 03:24:42 PM
Its the same every year. The neutral 'die hard' interest is always greater in Football than Hurling.  The participation rates would tell you that Football is more popular than Hurling.

Football has 31 Counties playing while Hurling has 12 plus some interest in about 4 others.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: magpie seanie on September 08, 2014, 03:39:43 PM
Why is it so seasy to get a hurling final ticket and football final tickets are like gold dust? Makes a balls out of trying to swap hurling tickets for football ones.

Simple answer

Population Tipp and KK= 250,000
Population Donegal + Kerry= 310,000

When Cork and Clare played last year ther was a massive shortage of tickets. New teams will always bring a new following and renewed interest as with Clare last year and Donegal this year. It doesnt mean the games will be any better though. Are you trying to make out there was some sort of lack of interest in yesterdays match?


Not really trying to say anything. I enjoy both games but wouldn't claim to know much about hurling as to be fair it's an alien game to where I'm from.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Minder on September 08, 2014, 03:57:12 PM
I don't think it matters who is playing in the hurling, they are easier to get
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on September 08, 2014, 03:58:36 PM
Its the same every year. The neutral 'die hard' interest is always greater in Football than Hurling.  The participation rates would tell you that Football is more popular than Hurling.

Football has 31 County boards supporting it while Hurling has 12 plus county boards supporting it with a little interest in about 4 others whilst the rest demonise it.

Fixed that for you Rossfan.

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on September 08, 2014, 04:01:13 PM
Its the same every year. The neutral 'die hard' interest is always greater in Football than Hurling.  The participation rates would tell you that Football is more popular than Hurling.

Football has 31 Counties playing while Hurling has 12 plus some interest in about 4 others.

Yup, that's what I was saying. The question was why is there greater demand for Football tickets. I'm agreeing with you.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Bingo on September 08, 2014, 04:02:07 PM
I'd say its a combination of a few things:

More counties would play football at senior level while lot of counties don't play Hurling, less neutral interest straight away. If people get offered Hurling tickets in these counties they will go but they mightn't go looking them. In Monaghan I'd imagine the county board will have more football tickets and homes than the hurling tickets.

In Hurling its nearly always the case that a county will be competing on a regular basis for an all-Ireland. Kilkenny been the obvious one, people there likely are that used to them they don't feel the urge to attend, there'll be another one or where at a recent one. Other counties mightn't be as regular but would have regular success. I'm sure demand in these counties are high but not as high if wasn't as frequent. Ticket prices would also put off some who may attend.

Football works somewhat different from above with teams less frequently getting there, its a bigger event and more people want to attend. Donegal been a great example, years without an appearance then two come along. Mayo the same, Dublin, Down, etc. Kerry with more appearances would be similar to Kilkenny. Demand must be massive in these counties as they don't know when they next one will be and they'll thrawl the country for tickets.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Dirtyball on September 08, 2014, 04:15:49 PM
Any auld donkey that can run, tap the ball over an opponents head, take a return pass and do the same again can play football at some sort of level. The bottom line is it has become a contactless sport thus taking any real meaning or purpose out of the game. Yes there are the few exceptions where there are games that are close rather than skilfull but the majority of inter county forwards cannot kick the ball over the bar from 35-40 metres . And when I mean the majority I mean 120/180 inter county forward cannot do it. There is FA skill involved in playing Gaelic football these days.. Where as hurling.... Well just watch yesterday's final again... Best field game in the world and always has been.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on September 08, 2014, 04:18:05 PM
Oh dear  ::) ::)
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Dinny Breen on September 08, 2014, 04:18:58 PM
Hmm, poor rugby tackles, hitting the ball as far as you can, drop the head and charge, great skills indeed  ::)
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on September 08, 2014, 04:32:07 PM
Given that thats Dirtyballs first post even remotely related to hurling I'd suggest he's a wum of the lowest order.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on September 08, 2014, 04:32:51 PM
Hmm, poor rugby tackles, hitting the ball as far as you can, drop the head and charge, great skills indeed  ::)

you didn't watch the game if you think there was a lot of 'hitting the ball as far as you can'. And if you can't appreciate the skills involved in running at full speed, and flicking a ball up onto your hurley, while holding off a man, and then flicking it over the bar from 40-50 yards out, well I give up :D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Dirtyball on September 08, 2014, 04:39:51 PM
Hmm, poor rugby tackles, hitting the ball as far as you can, drop the head and charge, great skills indeed  ::)
Let's hand pass it across the back 6 like they do in England! Knock it back to the keeper then and start again!   Great stuff that!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: muppet on September 08, 2014, 04:40:28 PM
Any auld donkey that can run, tap the ball over an opponents head, take a return pass and do the same again can play football at some sort of level. The bottom line is it has become a contactless sport thus taking any real meaning or purpose out of the game. Yes there are the few exceptions where there are games that are close rather than skilfull but the majority of inter county forwards cannot kick the ball over the bar from 35-40 metres . And when I mean the majority I mean 120/180 inter county forward cannot do it. There is FA skill involved in playing Gaelic football these days.. Where as hurling.... Well just watch yesterday's final again... Best field game in the world and always has been.

This is like saying the two best snookers players in 1985 couldn't pot the black, and of course here is the evidence: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDNpyNHrmjk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDNpyNHrmjk)

Equally some darts player who miss a few doubles are useless.

I would say almost all inter-county backs, never mind forwards can kick the ball over from 30-40 metres. The issue is pressure.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on September 08, 2014, 04:49:52 PM
Its the same every year. The neutral 'die hard' interest is always greater in Football than Hurling.  The participation rates would tell you that Football is more popular than Hurling.
Less skills to master making it easier to play so will attract more people.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: J70 on September 08, 2014, 05:02:29 PM
So much hurling is just hit and hope, like the long ball game in soccer. Hammer it down the field and hope your teammate can win it going up against a bunch of other players.  It's hard to see the sliotar too, like the puck in ice hockey.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on September 08, 2014, 05:16:57 PM
So much hurling is just hit and hope, like the long ball game in soccer. Hammer it down the field and hope your teammate can win it going up against a bunch of other players.  It's hard to see the sliotar too, like the puck in ice hockey.

You stick to your blanket defences and reggae songs. :D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: theticklemister on September 08, 2014, 05:18:18 PM
So much hurling is just hit and hope, like the long ball game in soccer. Hammer it down the field and hope your teammate can win it going up against a bunch of other players.  It's hard to see the sliotar too, like the puck in ice hockey.

A Donegal man's take on hurling
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on September 08, 2014, 05:18:54 PM
Hmm, poor rugby tackles, hitting the ball as far as you can, drop the head and charge, great skills indeed  ::)
Let's hand pass it across the back 6
Unlike the new "throwpass" so prevalent in hurlin these days  :-[
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Dinny Breen on September 08, 2014, 05:27:45 PM
Hmm, poor rugby tackles, hitting the ball as far as you can, drop the head and charge, great skills indeed  ::)

you didn't watch the game if you think there was a lot of 'hitting the ball as far as you can'. And if you can't appreciate the skills involved in running at full speed, and flicking a ball up onto your hurley, while holding off a man, and then flicking it over the bar from 40-50 yards out, well I give up :D

Come on AZ, the default action of any defender in hurling under pressure is a hit and hope long ball.

Different games different skills, I appreciate hurling for what it is but I see a lot of poor skills as well, the 5 minute spell before half-time was awful stuff but then Richie Hogan's first goal to me was pure genius. Just don't see the need to eulogise hurling at every opportunity particularly at the expense of football.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on September 08, 2014, 05:32:05 PM
Inferiority complex  or "small man " syndrome perhaps. :D

Whatever it's to do with - Gaelic football is the most popular and successful sport in Ireland and it has many skills too.
Now if we could only get Refs to enforce the 4 step rule so that the game would get more open....
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: muppet on September 08, 2014, 05:39:18 PM
Inferiority complex  or "small man " syndrome perhaps. :D

Hurlers have this because they always talk about hurling?

Em............

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on September 08, 2014, 05:55:48 PM
Inferiority complex  or "small man " syndrome perhaps. :D

Whatever it's to do with - Gaelic football is the most popular and successful sport in Ireland and it has many skills too.
Now if we could only get Refs to enforce the 4 step rule so that the game would get more open....
If anyone has an inferiority complex its fellas like you who continually take the bait  ;D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on September 08, 2014, 06:12:38 PM
This sneer at 'hit and hope' hurling amazes me. Hurling is a game of 14 dual contests. Hit and hope means the best man in the next dual will win the contest. If a team keeps winnning all the contests then they will probably win the game...and what is wrong with a game like that? Football is a different game and has to be played differently. If hit and hope worked Im sure footballers would be doing the same. Instead they try to hand pass the ball all the way up the field and have a go at kicking when close to goal.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on September 08, 2014, 06:44:40 PM
Aye, sure Kerry hit and hope into big Donaghy.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on September 08, 2014, 07:00:37 PM
The fact is the majority of people on here have played football but never hurling. to determine which sport is better than the other is silly but men who have played both at inter county like Brian McGilligan, teddy McCarthy, Sean og, all said they preferred hurling as a game, i think the only ones who can judge are person who have played both codes.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on September 08, 2014, 07:13:58 PM
I've played both and prefer football and I'd know plenty like me but that proves nothing. Don't think you have to have played both to have an opinion on which you prefer to watch.

Quote
This sneer at 'hit and hope' hurling amazes me. Hurling is a game of 14 dual contests.

It's not really and there has been a marked move away from such play over the past few years which suggests many are beginning to feel finding a free player is now the better option.

For me the fundamental difference between the codes is the skill in hurling is in controlling the ball, the skill in football is in the use of the ball. Controlling a ball in football is relatively easy while scoring in hurling is relatively easy, different games but both have plenty of skills which are challenging to master.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on September 08, 2014, 07:15:05 PM
That's like saying you can't judge a politician unless you're a politician. Ridiculous logical fallacy.

Certainly on here people are talking about the sports mainly as spectators, not players. A few anecdotes from dual players means feck all when put into perspective.

I don't know why people want to demean one or the other. Football is without a doubt the more popular, beyond that everything is utterly subjective.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: screenexile on September 08, 2014, 07:15:51 PM
Agreed!

I've played both and I was clean shite at hurling but was still MF on our minor team, it was enjoyable enough but I preferred football.

Yes the level of skill at the top is fantastic but truth be told there are only a few people in the Country at that level as witnessed by the fact you have like 6 counties winning the AI in the last 20 odd years. Yes by all means when you get to Munster/AIF level it's fantastic but scratch the surface and the level around the country is not a patch on it!!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on September 08, 2014, 08:15:34 PM
Inferiority complex  or "small man " syndrome perhaps. :D

Hurlers have this because they always talk about hurling?

Em............
No - they keep on telling themselves ( and us) how great hurling is. It's as if they have to keep saying it because deep down they are insecure about it all. The lady doth protest too much and all that.

People who are comfortable in their skins and confident in their sport don't feel the need to keep on harping about how great they are or their sport is.

Also why is it acceptable to criticise football while hurling has to be praised all the time.

Seriously though - the fact that there's no hurling around my part of the Country ( or oul rubby either) means that I have only a passing interest in the shticks game and can never get too excited about it all even an exciting game like yesterday's.
I did find it better than last year's 2 Finals because there was a football like intensity about this year's game.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: BluestackBoy on September 09, 2014, 09:16:07 AM
So much hurling is just hit and hope, like the long ball game in soccer. Hammer it down the field and hope your teammate can win it going up against a bunch of other players.  It's hard to see the sliotar too, like the puck in ice hockey.

A Donegal man's take on hurling

A little less of the sneering at Donegal hurling if you don't mind.

We got promoted to Div 2 last year and now take our place as a genuine dual county which confers on us the right to contribute knowledgeably to all posts regarding hurling ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Sidney on September 09, 2014, 09:35:40 AM
So much hurling is just hit and hope, like the long ball game in soccer. Hammer it down the field and hope your teammate can win it going up against a bunch of other players.  It's hard to see the sliotar too, like the puck in ice hockey.

A Donegal man's take on hurling

A little less of the sneering at Donegal hurling if you don't mind.

We got promoted to Div 2 last year and now take our place as a genuine dual county which confers on us the right to contribute knowledgeably to all posts regarding hurling ;D ;D ;D
Whoah....steady on there. You have to be officially admitted to the clique first before you can do that. Only we members of the hurling firmament can decide if that honour can be bestowed upon you. I saw a couple of lads with Derry jerseys on Sunday evening outside a well known hurling pub in Dublin. They had obviously made the mistake of thinking that they were part of the hurling firmament and that their views would be welcomed or taken seriously. They were mistaken and slunk off when their views were dismissed by the true hurling men gathered there. We in Dublin have ourselves only been admitted to the clique very recently and would still be considered relatively junior members, although if you have a grandfather from Tipperary and your mother is from Limerick, and can talk for 20 minutes about the 1987 Munster final draw and replay, as is the case with myself, more senior membership can be conferred upon you.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on September 09, 2014, 01:05:45 PM
Quote
a well known hurling pub in Dublin


A hurling pub in Dublin??? Such a thing is about as genuine as an Irish pub in Bangkok! ;D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Sidney on September 09, 2014, 02:36:41 PM
Quote
a well known hurling pub in Dublin


A hurling pub in Dublin??? Such a thing is about as genuine as an Irish pub in Bangkok! ;D
The plethora of All-Ireland winners and other assembled hurling intelligentsia who frequent it would disagree. A serious hurling pub for serious hurling discussion between serious hurling men.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on September 09, 2014, 02:47:10 PM
Quote
a well known hurling pub in Dublin


A hurling pub in Dublin??? Such a thing is about as genuine as an Irish pub in Bangkok! ;D
The plethora of All-Ireland winners and other assembled hurling intelligentsia who frequent it would disagree. A serious hurling pub for serious hurling discussion between serious hurling men.

That's a bit serious for my liking.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: pullhard on September 21, 2014, 09:14:27 PM
Watched the first half, no intensity in the game, men able to take their steps untroubled. Expected more from the big ball game.  #intheshade

No real comparison with hurling
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: macdanger2 on September 21, 2014, 09:22:42 PM
Watched the first half, no intensity in the game, men able to take their steps untroubled. Expected more from the big ball game.  #intheshade

No real comparison with hurling

You're dead right, hard to see football prospering at all. Do you think they'll even have enough teams entering next year to run the competition at all??
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: pullhard on September 21, 2014, 09:26:28 PM
Watched the first half, no intensity in the game, men able to take their steps untroubled. Expected more from the big ball game.  #intheshade

No real comparison with hurling

You're dead right, hard to see football prospering at all. Do you think they'll even have enough teams entering next year to run the competition at all??

hopefully not, easier just to replace with rugby league
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on September 21, 2014, 10:09:50 PM
It's great that we have another All Ireland Hurling final to look forward to next weekend.
The match today was dung.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on September 21, 2014, 10:12:14 PM
Watched the first half, no intensity in the game, men able to take their steps untroubled. Expected more from the big ball game.  #intheshade

No real comparison with hurling


So why are hurling people obsessed with making the comparison?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: pullhard on September 21, 2014, 10:26:35 PM
visitors can't see pics , please register or login
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on September 21, 2014, 10:30:02 PM
Oh right. Good point.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: macdanger2 on September 21, 2014, 10:51:07 PM
He has you there hardy tbf
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Old yeller on September 21, 2014, 11:05:04 PM
Watched the first half, no intensity in the game, men able to take their steps untroubled. Expected more from the big ball game.  #intheshade

No real comparison with hurling


So why are hurling people obsessed with making the comparison?
If the football championship was made up of the best 8 teams in the country( think A.I Quarter Finals on) it would be unreal aswel, not a mismatch in sight. But dont worry, clean, manly hurling, with its revolutionary tactics ( Hit the F**kin thing)  and lack of cynicism will save the day!!!
 Get over it
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on September 21, 2014, 11:26:53 PM
I wish they had ' Hit the F**kin thing' today. Would have made for a much better spectacle and the tactics I saw today amount to one word..puke
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Old yeller on September 21, 2014, 11:33:28 PM
I wish they had ' Hit the F**kin thing' today. Would have made for a much better spectacle and the tactics I saw today amount to one word..puke
If you dont like football, stop watching it. But stop trying to compare the two, totally different sports. Hurling may well be the fastest field sport in the world, Formula 1 is the fastest tarmac sport in the world, doesnt make it the best.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: pullhard on September 22, 2014, 08:24:57 AM
I wish they had ' Hit the F**kin thing' today. Would have made for a much better spectacle and the tactics I saw today amount to one word..puke

I am an avid sports fan, what I seen today from both teams was the Gaelic Football equivalent of total football. I seen full backs running up the pitch to take points. Whats the point in a team lining out 1-15 anymore? I don't recall any real kick passes, this isn't to take away from the skill of a long and accurate handpass. However, this style is somewhat at odds with the sports name! I was sickened by cork hurling in the early-mid 00's started trying to make hurling into a hand passing game.

If you dont like football, stop watching it. But stop trying to compare the two, totally different sports. Hurling may well be the fastest field sport in the world, Formula 1 is the fastest tarmac sport in the world, doesn't make it the best.
I did, I put on the rugby league, Warrington v Widnes game was mental!

I have played and refereed both. Hurling is a great leveler, in terms of cancelling out physical size differences. I am amazed how two sports which are so different are controlled by the same set of rules.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Sidney on September 22, 2014, 08:42:07 AM
Time to stick a knife in every football in Ireland. Yesterday was a dirge.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: tonto1888 on September 22, 2014, 11:37:28 AM
I do prefer football overall but, for me, when hurling is played at a high intensity between two good teams there is no match in a any sport
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Sidney on September 22, 2014, 11:47:13 AM
Watched the first half, no intensity in the game, men able to take their steps untroubled. Expected more from the big ball game.  #intheshade

No real comparison with hurling


So why are hurling people obsessed with making the comparison?
We make the comparison because:
i) we know the superiority of our game sticks in the craw of football people and we like to pick at your festering sore of inferiority every now and again
ii) the hurling firmament is cliqueish and exclusive by nature and we like nothing more than to be condescending to those outside the clique
iii) for the laugh
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on September 22, 2014, 11:58:44 AM
The speed of the ball means hurling is less susceptible to a lot of the negativity that seems to be driving the development of football tactics at the moment . Duignan often says you can't say a hurling match is over with 6 points between the teams and 5 minutes left. 
 
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: pullhard on September 22, 2014, 12:17:32 PM
Watched the first half, no intensity in the game, men able to take their steps untroubled. Expected more from the big ball game.  #intheshade

No real comparison with hurling


So why are hurling people obsessed with making the comparison?
We make the comparison because:
i) we know the superiority of our game sticks in the craw of football people and we like to pick at your festering sore of inferiority every now and again
ii) the hurling firmament is cliqueish and exclusive by nature and we like nothing more than to be condescending to those outside the clique
iii) for the laugh
iv) Yesterday game was suppose the best two teams in the country, it was dire to watch, in comparison with hurling final...

Fixed that
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: pullhard on September 22, 2014, 12:19:25 PM
Watched the first half, no intensity in the game, men able to take their steps untroubled. Expected more from the big ball game.  #intheshade

No real comparison with hurling


So why are hurling people obsessed with making the comparison?
If the football championship was made up of the best 8 teams in the country( think A.I Quarter Finals on) it would be unreal aswel, not a mismatch in sight. But dont worry, clean, manly hurling, with its revolutionary tactics ( Hit the F**kin thing)  and lack of cynicism will save the day!!!
 Get over it
The speed of the ball means hurling is less susceptible to a lot of the negativity that seems to be driving the development of football tactics at the moment . Duignan often says you can't say a hurling match is over with 6 points between the teams and 5 minutes left.

Make your minds up
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: orangeman on November 11, 2014, 11:35:46 AM
Interesting views. Be good for Sky.

http://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/sport/hurling-gopro-footage-is-quite-special-650565.html
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on August 07, 2016, 05:14:34 PM
Good time to bring this one up again after a serious hurling game the day, football cries out for a game like this, classic stuff with no quarter given
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: SCFC on August 07, 2016, 05:18:46 PM
Good time to bring this one up again after a serious hurling game the day, football cries out for a game like this, classic stuff with no quarter given
It's the first decent game of hurling all year.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on August 07, 2016, 05:24:15 PM
Good time to bring this one up again after a serious hurling game the day, football cries out for a game like this, classic stuff with no quarter given
It's the first decent game of hurling all year.
It was the first decent game of senior inter county gaa all year.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on August 07, 2016, 05:24:54 PM
outside of Derry Tipp i dont think u hardly pick out a good football game neither, but that hurling match the day was another game for the ages, there is about  1 / 2 great football matches about  every 10 years these days, Kerry and Mayo 2 yrs ago and Kerry and Dublin about 4 yrs ago been the pick of them
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on August 07, 2016, 07:27:15 PM
What was most encouraging today was that Waterfprd reverted to the traditional style of hurling but almost lost it when they went back to the defensive style towards the end. Now hopefully the sweeper system that has plagued hurling for the last few years is done and dusted(it doesnt work) and we can get back to having many great games, every year. Davy fits pleas take note.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on August 07, 2016, 08:18:26 PM
What was most encouraging today was that Waterfprd reverted to the traditional style of hurling but almost lost it when they went back to the defensive style towards the end. Now hopefully the sweeper system that has plagued hurling for the last few years is done and dusted(it doesnt work) and we can get back to having many great games, every year. Davy fits pleas take note.

 ;D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: thejuice on August 07, 2016, 09:50:43 PM
visitors can't see pics , please register or login
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: bennydorano on August 13, 2016, 08:57:36 PM
Austin Gleeson POTY?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Il Bomber Destro on August 13, 2016, 09:12:49 PM
The fear RTE and the GAA media have of Brian Cody is disgusting.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Il Bomber Destro on August 13, 2016, 09:15:39 PM
outside of Derry Tipp i dont think u hardly pick out a good football game neither, but that hurling match the day was another game for the ages, there is about  1 / 2 great football matches about  every 10 years these days, Kerry and Mayo 2 yrs ago and Kerry and Dublin about 4 yrs ago been the pick of them

The AI football semi-finals (including the replays) of the last two years have all been very enjoyable games.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on August 13, 2016, 09:50:59 PM
Football is in a bad place and the odd good game doesn't change that. We have some of the most talented footballers that have ever played the game around now but due to the way the game is played they could be replaced by fit decent club footballers and you'd hardly know. That allied to supporters excusing the cowardly sledging and cynical play of their own players means we are in a race to the bottom with the game.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: stew on August 14, 2016, 02:01:37 AM
The hurling that was played today destroys football, I hate saying that but the hurling that was played today was absolutely sublime and hit heights football is incapable of these days.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: GalwayBayBoy on August 14, 2016, 02:22:42 AM
The hurling that was played today destroys football, I hate saying that but the hurling that was played today was absolutely sublime and hit heights football is incapable of these days.

Plenty of  bad hurling games around each Summer especially early in the championship but yeah even a great football match can't hold a candle to a great hurling match. Unfortunately you might only get a couple of those games each Summer.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on August 14, 2016, 11:09:24 AM
The hurling that was played today destroys football, I hate saying that but the hurling that was played today was absolutely sublime and hit heights football is incapable of these days.

Plenty of  bad hurling games around each Summer especially early in the championship but yeah even a great football match can't hold a candle to a great hurling match. Unfortunately you might only get a couple of those games each Summer.

Games like yesterdays come around only once in a while in hurling also, this years hurling championship has been pretty forgettable barring these two games, but hopefully Galway and Tipp will forget about"systems" and rely on hurling skill, bravery and mental fortitude to get them over the line as hurling is meant to be high scoring so let them at it.
Hopefully Davy Fitz and Clare take note for next year
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on August 14, 2016, 12:19:51 PM
How many cracking football matches have there been this summer?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: skeog on August 14, 2016, 12:34:06 PM
hurling is a totally different game to football way more physical ie lethal weapon in your possesion
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on August 14, 2016, 12:37:18 PM
hurling is a totally different game to football way more physical ie lethal weapon in your possesion

Hurling is 10 times less physical than football.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on August 14, 2016, 01:35:44 PM
hurling is a totally different game to football way more physical ie lethal weapon in your possesion

Hurling is 10 times less physical than football.

Absolutely not true at the top level, which is all I've ever been exposed to in a football county. Some of the shit yesterday that wasn't even a foul to the referee would have been sending off offences in football. You don see footballers swinging a fist to the top of someone's head to stop them playing a ball, which is something that happens multiple times with a hurley in any hurling match I've witnessed.

The difference between the codes is akin to rugby and American football in my eyes, one has no padding/weaponary and the one that does allows players to hit and launch themselves in ways they never would dare to without the pads or weapons in this case. The very nature of the game allows for more reckless abandon in hurling, both is how so much of it boils down to hoofing balls up the field in any direction and in how players launch themselves at balls or try to swing hurleys to get a touch on the silotar, usually in situations where there's a hand or arm between their hurley and the sliotar. It's a mental game.

It's almost as if the GAA have bought into the hype about the pace and madness of hurling and let players away with obvious and at times recklessly cynical and dangerous fouls.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: INDIANA on August 14, 2016, 01:37:00 PM
hurling is a totally different game to football way more physical ie lethal weapon in your possesion

Hurling is 10 times less physical than football.

Those that think hurling is more physical can never have played football!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Il Bomber Destro on August 14, 2016, 02:32:16 PM
Football is much more physical. It is rare for players these days to hop straight out of minor into senior, particularly with the big counties which cannot be said for hurling and this is all down to physical development.

Hurling is very aimless though which I think negates a lot of the hyperbole surrounding it.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on August 14, 2016, 02:34:43 PM
hurling is a totally different game to football way more physical ie lethal weapon in your possesion

Hurling is 10 times less physical than football.

Those that think hurling is more physical can never have played football!

Or hurling. They see hurls, and cut fingers and think physical, but there's far fewer physical collisions in the small ball game.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on August 14, 2016, 02:47:29 PM
The problem with gaelic football is that it seems not everybody is in agreement that it has been poor. Most hurling people will admit that the hurling was poor this year before the Waterford Kilkenny games. I havnt heard one person suggesting it was good up to that point. What we have seen since has been top class. Until footballer followers are honest and united about the state of the game then the bitching and complaining about refs, blanket defences, hand passing etc etc will continue. However for every one that thinks all is not well in Gaelic football another thinks its fine as it is.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: INDIANA on August 14, 2016, 03:11:33 PM
The problem with gaelic football is that it seems not everybody is in agreement that it has been poor. Most hurling people will admit that the hurling was poor this year before the Waterford Kilkenny games. I havnt heard one person suggesting it was good up to that point. What we have seen since has been top class. Until footballer followers are honest and united about the state of the game then the bitching and complaining about refs, blanket defences, hand passing etc etc will continue. However for every one that thinks all is not well in Gaelic football another thinks its fine as it is.

The hurling championship has been no poorer then any other in the last 25 years. If anything the hurling championship is becoming more interesting as the counties are reasonably well matched below the top 4 and Kilkenny are on the wane in a big way.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: GaillimhIarthair on August 14, 2016, 08:18:20 PM
hurling is a totally different game to football way more physical ie lethal weapon in your possesion

Hurling is 10 times less physical than football.
Having played both at a reasonable level, I would fully agree.  People see bits of hurls flying and assume it's a savage game but you would be in absolute bits after a good level of football more so than  hurling. 
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ashman on August 14, 2016, 08:27:52 PM
In hurling there are constant contests for the ball and real intensity .  In modern Gaelic football with all the emphasis on possession and the cursed hand pass we not have a game with no contests and less and less intensity .  The hand pass has to be restricted in football .  It is destroying the sport as a spectacle .
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on August 14, 2016, 09:26:02 PM
No Ulster county has a competitive senior hurling team.
Coincidence?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: trileacman on August 14, 2016, 10:43:17 PM
No Ulster county has a competitive senior hurling team.
Coincidence?

Meath are shite at football and hurling.
Coincidence?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 14, 2016, 11:02:38 PM
There's a beauty in a low scoring tactical fcukfest in football that hurling can never have.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 14, 2016, 11:05:02 PM
The problem with gaelic football is that it seems not everybody is in agreement that it has been poor. Most hurling people will admit that the hurling was poor this year before the Waterford Kilkenny games. I havnt heard one person suggesting it was good up to that point. What we have seen since has been top class. Until footballer followers are honest and united about the state of the game then the bitching and complaining about refs, blanket defences, hand passing etc etc will continue. However for every one that thinks all is not well in Gaelic football another thinks its fine as it is.

Football was never beautiful. I remember the 80s. It was shite enough. But it was our shite. And we loved it. Now it's on the TV a lot and people demand entertainment.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: trileacman on August 14, 2016, 11:14:44 PM
The problem with gaelic football is that it seems not everybody is in agreement that it has been poor. Most hurling people will admit that the hurling was poor this year before the Waterford Kilkenny games. I havnt heard one person suggesting it was good up to that point. What we have seen since has been top class. Until footballer followers are honest and united about the state of the game then the bitching and complaining about refs, blanket defences, hand passing etc etc will continue. However for every one that thinks all is not well in Gaelic football another thinks its fine as it is.

Football was never beautiful. I remember the 80s. It was shite enough. But it was our shite. And we loved it. Now it's on the TV a lot and people demand entertainment.

True that.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Il Bomber Destro on August 14, 2016, 11:14:59 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FsqJFIJ5lLs
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on August 14, 2016, 11:17:59 PM
The problem with gaelic football is that it seems not everybody is in agreement that it has been poor. Most hurling people will admit that the hurling was poor this year before the Waterford Kilkenny games. I havnt heard one person suggesting it was good up to that point. What we have seen since has been top class. Until footballer followers are honest and united about the state of the game then the bitching and complaining about refs, blanket defences, hand passing etc etc will continue. However for every one that thinks all is not well in Gaelic football another thinks its fine as it is.

Football was never beautiful. I remember the 80s. It was shite enough. But it was our shite. And we loved it. Now it's on the TV a lot and people demand entertainment.

True that.

Couldn't disagree more. Football when played properly and with courage is a wonderful spectacle and always has been. Dublin are still brilliant to watch and there's few things more beautiful in sport than a great point in football. However, what's been happening over the past few years is both worrying and very disappointing. It's a genuinely wonderful sport but it's being dragged down into an unwatchable borefest at the moment. We've just seen two great hurling semi finals and they were great because all four teams went out to win by going for it. Only Dublin go for it all the time in football.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on August 14, 2016, 11:26:10 PM
I have only a passing interest in hurling, wouldn't go to a game but find it very watchable on TV, i have a big interest in football but many a game on Tv am changing the channel back and forth the games be of that poor a spectacle.

Even tight games of recent weeks i find the style of play boring to watch and honestly think football seemed to be a better sport for spectators back in the 90`s
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Il Bomber Destro on August 14, 2016, 11:27:08 PM
The problem with gaelic football is that it seems not everybody is in agreement that it has been poor. Most hurling people will admit that the hurling was poor this year before the Waterford Kilkenny games. I havnt heard one person suggesting it was good up to that point. What we have seen since has been top class. Until footballer followers are honest and united about the state of the game then the bitching and complaining about refs, blanket defences, hand passing etc etc will continue. However for every one that thinks all is not well in Gaelic football another thinks its fine as it is.

Football was never beautiful. I remember the 80s. It was shite enough. But it was our shite. And we loved it. Now it's on the TV a lot and people demand entertainment.

True that.

Couldn't disagree more. Football when played properly and with courage is a wonderful spectacle and always has been. Dublin are still brilliant to watch and there's few things more beautiful in sport than a great point in football. However, what's been happening over the past few years is both worrying and very disappointing. It's a genuinely wonderful sport but it's being dragged down into an unwatchable borefest at the moment. We've just seen two great hurling semi finals and they were great because all four teams went out to win by going for it. Only Dublin go for it all the time in football.

Only Dublin receive €1m funding from the GAA every year.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 14, 2016, 11:33:08 PM
Take off the glasses. Kerry in their pomp were great to watch in the early 80s but much of the rest was boot the thing as far as you can.

The game has changed and spectator expectations need to change with it. It happens with most sports. Hurling is almost exempt because you can score in two moves:  keeper to team mate and over the bar. 6 seconds. In football, that can never happen.

Are Dublin great because they are hammering sides?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Il Bomber Destro on August 14, 2016, 11:36:50 PM
I have only a passing interest in hurling, wouldn't go to a game but find it very watchable on TV, i have a big interest in football but many a game on Tv am changing the channel back and forth the games be of that poor a spectacle.

Even tight games of recent weeks i find the style of play boring to watch and honestly think football seemed to be a better sport for spectators back in the 90`s

The tripe of harking back to the old days is nonsense, there were plenty of god damn awful games back in the 90s. Big aimless punts in the forwards was anything but enjoyable, football has evolved, players have got bigger, stronger quicker, lads who couldn't solo with their weaker foot never mind kick points. The skills of the modern day player are much higher now but the way players have evolved physically and athletically in modern sport necessitates that packed defences are employed. I could not take a game seriously where teams play wide open and big, strong, quick guys just burst through the middle every time for goal chances.

Ciaran McDonald was very good on Second Captains a couple of years back and said he would enjoy playing the game today as it requires more thought and composure.

What saddens me from a spectator perspective is the huge gulf in class that has opened up, the 90s and 00s were great for unfashionable counties making the breakthrough - Derry, Donegal, Tyrone and Armagh winning their first AIs. Laois and Westmeath grabbing Leinster titles, Sligo and Leitrim winning Connachts, Fermanagh a ball hair from an All Ireland final etc etc.

Those days are gone now and they won't return. The game is not weaker aesthetically, it is weaker competitively and that is the crux of the problem.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 14, 2016, 11:43:30 PM
I have only a passing interest in hurling, wouldn't go to a game but find it very watchable on TV, i have a big interest in football but many a game on Tv am changing the channel back and forth the games be of that poor a spectacle.

Even tight games of recent weeks i find the style of play boring to watch and honestly think football seemed to be a better sport for spectators back in the 90`s

The tripe of harking back to the old days is nonsense, there were plenty of god damn awful games back in the 90s. Big aimless punts in the forwards was anything but enjoyable, football has evolved, players have got bigger, stronger quicker, lads who couldn't solo with their weaker foot never mind kick points. The skills of the modern day player are much higher now but the way players have evolved physically and athletically in modern sport necessitates that packed defences are employed. I could not take a game seriously where teams play wide open and big, strong, quick guys just burst through the middle every time for goal chances.

Ciaran McDonald was very good on Second Captains a couple of years back and said he would enjoy playing the game today as it requires more thought and composure.

What saddens me from a spectator perspective is the huge gulf in class that has opened up, the 90s and 00s were great for unfashionable counties making the breakthrough - Derry, Donegal, Tyrone and Armagh winning their first AIs. Laois and Westmeath grabbing Leinster titles, Sligo and Leitrim winning Connachts, Fermanagh a ball hair from an All Ireland final etc etc.

Those days are gone now and they won't return. The game is not weaker aesthetically, it is weaker competitively and that is the crux of the problem.

I disagree with your last point. Tipp in the semis is rather mad. Roscommon are knocking as were Monaghan. I can see Cavan featuring soon.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Il Bomber Destro on August 14, 2016, 11:51:26 PM
I have only a passing interest in hurling, wouldn't go to a game but find it very watchable on TV, i have a big interest in football but many a game on Tv am changing the channel back and forth the games be of that poor a spectacle.

Even tight games of recent weeks i find the style of play boring to watch and honestly think football seemed to be a better sport for spectators back in the 90`s

The tripe of harking back to the old days is nonsense, there were plenty of god damn awful games back in the 90s. Big aimless punts in the forwards was anything but enjoyable, football has evolved, players have got bigger, stronger quicker, lads who couldn't solo with their weaker foot never mind kick points. The skills of the modern day player are much higher now but the way players have evolved physically and athletically in modern sport necessitates that packed defences are employed. I could not take a game seriously where teams play wide open and big, strong, quick guys just burst through the middle every time for goal chances.

Ciaran McDonald was very good on Second Captains a couple of years back and said he would enjoy playing the game today as it requires more thought and composure.

What saddens me from a spectator perspective is the huge gulf in class that has opened up, the 90s and 00s were great for unfashionable counties making the breakthrough - Derry, Donegal, Tyrone and Armagh winning their first AIs. Laois and Westmeath grabbing Leinster titles, Sligo and Leitrim winning Connachts, Fermanagh a ball hair from an All Ireland final etc etc.

Those days are gone now and they won't return. The game is not weaker aesthetically, it is weaker competitively and that is the crux of the problem.

I disagree with your last point. Tipp in the semis is rather mad. Roscommon are knocking as were Monaghan. I can see Cavan featuring soon.

Tipp are where they are by doing what?

Beating fairly mediocre Derry and Galway sides. They will be filleted by Mayo in the semi-final with all due respect to them. They are where they are due the anomaly of a poor draw.

Roscommon have been an absolute rabble at Championship level and are as much knocking at the door than a team like Laois and Westmeath are. Monaghan look like a team on the decline. Cavan's new management will be of interest but I think Derry have more tools to do more than them in the coming years if they can get it together.

The fact is there is a hierarchy now, there is Dublin, then a handful of teams who can beat them, then maybe another 2/3 who could beat those sides - after that it's a bit of a free for all.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 14, 2016, 11:54:33 PM
Would that not be the same in every era?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on August 15, 2016, 12:00:41 AM
Take off the glasses. Kerry in their pomp were great to watch in the early 80s but much of the rest was boot the thing as far as you can.

The game has changed and spectator expectations need to change with it. It happens with most sports. Hurling is almost exempt because you can score in two moves:  keeper to team mate and over the bar. 6 seconds. In football, that can never happen.

Are Dublin great because they are hammering sides?

Football during the 90's and 2000's was brilliant with many great games. It's nonsense to say spectators need to change expectations, why should we settle for the cowardly, negative football we see now? As Wildweasel74 said, even close games like Mayo Tyrone, Donegal Tyrone, Cork Donegal were all boring to watch. The style of football and safety first attitude of teams is killing the sport.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ashman on August 15, 2016, 12:05:38 AM
The football from 1991 to 1995 on so was great to watch .  1990s was great to watch
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 15, 2016, 12:08:28 AM
Take off the glasses. Kerry in their pomp were great to watch in the early 80s but much of the rest was boot the thing as far as you can.

The game has changed and spectator expectations need to change with it. It happens with most sports. Hurling is almost exempt because you can score in two moves:  keeper to team mate and over the bar. 6 seconds. In football, that can never happen.

Are Dublin great because they are hammering sides?

Football during the 90's and 2000's was brilliant with many great games. It's nonsense to say spectators need to change expectations, why should we settle for the cowardly, negative football we see now? As Wildweasel74 said, even close games like Mayo Tyrone, Donegal Tyrone, Cork Donegal were all boring to watch. The style of football and safety first attitude of teams is killing the sport.

I suppose you're right. They were brilliant. The finals will live long in the memory. Well 2005 will.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Il Bomber Destro on August 15, 2016, 12:13:36 AM
Would that not be the same in every era?

No, even when Kerry/Tyrone/Armagh were dominant in the 00s they could be beaten by pretty much any team at any given time. The same is not true today, only 3/4 teams in the country possess the ability to put it up to Dublin and Dublin could stuff them if they hit the right groove. Of these 3/4 teams only few could put it up to them in a meaningful game. Only an anomaly in the draw will ensure a team outside the top 5/6 won't be in the last 4 - that was not always the case.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 15, 2016, 12:17:18 AM
I'm not sure about that. Only Tyrone or Armagh stopped Kerry. For a while, only Tyrone or Kerry stopped Armagh. Tyrone were the weak link.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Il Bomber Destro on August 15, 2016, 12:20:51 AM
I'm not sure about that. Only Tyrone or Armagh stopped Kerry. For a while, only Tyrone or Kerry stopped Armagh. Tyrone were the weak link.

Down beat them, Donegal beat them, Monaghan should have beaten them, Sligo nearly beat them.

The fact was teams didn't go up against Kerry before games with -15 handicaps. They were plenty of teams who could put it up to them, there are 3/4 teams who could put it up to Dublin and they will probably all start the match at odds of 2/1 or greater. As a competitive spectacle, football is fucked.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on August 15, 2016, 12:21:17 AM
 The skills of the modern day player are much higher now  - well i think you find most teams had a detailed freetaker to take frees not goalkeepers, the art of taking frees on the ground has died, many teams had left and right sided free takers, too many players now cant seem to kick pass a ball, take out the big stuff, the top 10% of intercounty men, i think you find 90% of players of 20yrs ago were probably more skillful than there compatriots now adays.

The big change today is all the extra training, weights, diets players have these days. Matt Connor from Offaly the most skillful footballer i seen

A man won footballer of the year a few years ago and he literally cannot solo the ball properly!!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 15, 2016, 12:24:28 AM
I'm not sure about that. Only Tyrone or Armagh stopped Kerry. For a while, only Tyrone or Kerry stopped Armagh. Tyrone were the weak link.

Down beat them, Donegal beat them, Monaghan should have beaten them, Sligo nearly beat them.

The fact was teams didn't go up against Kerry before games with -15 handicaps. They were plenty of teams who could put it up to them, there are 3/4 teams who could put it up to Dublin and they will probably all start the match at odds of 2/1 or greater. As a competitive spectacle, football is fucked.

Dublin have never won back to back All-Irelands. Sorry, this recent side. You're being sensationalist. In fact they haven't made back to back finals.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: trileacman on August 15, 2016, 12:33:08 AM
I think the financial clout of Dublin is the real problem. It's lead to such a distortion of the competition that teams have to go very defensively to give themselves a chance at beating it. You can go man to man and get hammered or keep it tight and produce a less shameful score line.

Even up to 2014 Tyrone were very expansive, think they were the top scoring team in the championship that year up until the semi. With that return and the league final appearance Tyrones fortunes looked rejuvanated but a typical loss to a more calculated and defensive Donegal and Harte realised he was fighting a losing battle. As he had realised 10 years previous with Armagh, if you can't beat them join them.

All the top teams bar Dublin are playing with a heavy concentration on defence. It's a natural reaction to try and limit the scoring power of the mega rich.

It's money, not tactics or mangers, which is distorting the game and lowering the quality.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Il Bomber Destro on August 15, 2016, 12:33:40 AM
I'm not sure about that. Only Tyrone or Armagh stopped Kerry. For a while, only Tyrone or Kerry stopped Armagh. Tyrone were the weak link.

Down beat them, Donegal beat them, Monaghan should have beaten them, Sligo nearly beat them.

The fact was teams didn't go up against Kerry before games with -15 handicaps. They were plenty of teams who could put it up to them, there are 3/4 teams who could put it up to Dublin and they will probably all start the match at odds of 2/1 or greater. As a competitive spectacle, football is fucked.

Dublin have never won back to back All-Irelands. Sorry, this recent side. You're being sensationalist. In fact they haven't made back to back finals.

Donegal are the only side to have beaten Dublin since Jim Gavin took over in a game where Donegal, one of the top teams in the country at the time were 10/1 outsiders. I don't think I'm being sensationalist for one second.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: trileacman on August 15, 2016, 12:41:23 AM
I'm not sure about that. Only Tyrone or Armagh stopped Kerry. For a while, only Tyrone or Kerry stopped Armagh. Tyrone were the weak link.
We were knocked out of Ulster championship and the all Ireland proper by Donegal, Mayo, Derry, Laois, and cork whilst reigning AI champions. Armagh were knocked out in that era by Wexford and Fermanagh and a poor Monaghan side whilst All Ireland champions. Results like those are now largely absent in thIs era
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 15, 2016, 12:48:01 AM
I'm not sure about that. Only Tyrone or Armagh stopped Kerry. For a while, only Tyrone or Kerry stopped Armagh. Tyrone were the weak link.

Down beat them, Donegal beat them, Monaghan should have beaten them, Sligo nearly beat them.

The fact was teams didn't go up against Kerry before games with -15 handicaps. They were plenty of teams who could put it up to them, there are 3/4 teams who could put it up to Dublin and they will probably all start the match at odds of 2/1 or greater. As a competitive spectacle, football is fucked.

Dublin have never won back to back All-Irelands. Sorry, this recent side. You're being sensationalist. In fact they haven't made back to back finals.

Donegal are the only side to have beaten Dublin since Jim Gavin took over in a game where Donegal, one of the top teams in the country at the time were 10/1 outsiders. I don't think I'm being sensationalist for one second.

Jaysus sure weren't Dublin bate by Cork and Kerry last year as well as Cork, Derry and Donegal the previous year.

Yiz are mental. People live in the present and make judgements based on the last 5 mins.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Il Bomber Destro on August 15, 2016, 12:54:46 AM
I'm not sure about that. Only Tyrone or Armagh stopped Kerry. For a while, only Tyrone or Kerry stopped Armagh. Tyrone were the weak link.

Down beat them, Donegal beat them, Monaghan should have beaten them, Sligo nearly beat them.

The fact was teams didn't go up against Kerry before games with -15 handicaps. They were plenty of teams who could put it up to them, there are 3/4 teams who could put it up to Dublin and they will probably all start the match at odds of 2/1 or greater. As a competitive spectacle, football is fucked.

Dublin have never won back to back All-Irelands. Sorry, this recent side. You're being sensationalist. In fact they haven't made back to back finals.

Donegal are the only side to have beaten Dublin since Jim Gavin took over in a game where Donegal, one of the top teams in the country at the time were 10/1 outsiders. I don't think I'm being sensationalist for one second.

Jaysus sure weren't Dublin bate by Cork and Kerry last year as well as Cork, Derry and Donegal the previous year.

Yiz are mental. People live in the present and make judgements based on the last 5 mins.

Why are you bringing league results into this?

They are completely irrelevant when it comes to Championship. The facts say Dublin have only been beaten once under Jim Gavin, by a team who were one of the top teams in the country at the time and started the game as 10/1 outsiders against Dublin. Sadly Dublin are just on a completely different level to everyone else at the minute and on a given day there are only 2/3 teams capable of catching them - that was never the case with any of the Kerry/Tyrone/Armagh teams that were winning All Irelands through the 00s.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ONeill on August 15, 2016, 01:04:45 AM
From 2002-2009 the only teams to knock Kerry out were Armagh (once) and Tyrone (3). You're being sensationalist.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Il Bomber Destro on August 15, 2016, 07:37:47 AM
From 2002-2009 the only teams to knock Kerry out were Armagh (once) and Tyrone (3). You're being sensationalist.

And in that time they teams such as Monaghan (twice), Galway and Sligo who came very close to putting Kerry out of the Championship. Only the big teams of the current era are capable of giving Dublin a game, the same cannot be said of Kerry in the 00s. They had plenty of close escapes.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: BennyHarp on August 15, 2016, 08:41:32 AM
I think they should run the hurling championship in the same format as the football. Everyone chucked in together, let's see Tyrone v Clare in the first round of a qualifier. Let's see the first round of the Connacht senior hurling championship between Mayo and Roscommon live on National TV or Sky. Let's see the div 1 teams only play each other in on four occasions throughout the whole championship campaign until the final. Then see if the quality of the hurling on show puts football in the shade.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: lenny on August 15, 2016, 09:34:54 AM
I'm not sure about that. Only Tyrone or Armagh stopped Kerry. For a while, only Tyrone or Kerry stopped Armagh. Tyrone were the weak link.

Down beat them, Donegal beat them, Monaghan should have beaten them, Sligo nearly beat them.

The fact was teams didn't go up against Kerry before games with -15 handicaps. They were plenty of teams who could put it up to them, there are 3/4 teams who could put it up to Dublin and they will probably all start the match at odds of 2/1 or greater. As a competitive spectacle, football is fucked.

As usual you are talking absolute drivel. Dublin only won last years final by a kick of a ball and were taken to a replay in the semi. Donegal were within a kick of a ball of them in the latter stages of last weeks game. A lot of people consider the 70s and early 80s to be the golden period of gaelic football. In that period Kerry were far more dominant than Dublin are now and it certainly wasn't considered to be bad for football as a spectacle. I'm really enjoying watching the dubs at this time because they are the one top team who play the game in a positve way and are always entertaining.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on August 15, 2016, 01:46:16 PM
I think they should run the hurling championship in the same format as the football. Everyone chucked in together, let's see Tyrone v Clare in the first round of a qualifier. Let's see the first round of the Connacht senior hurling championship between Mayo and Roscommon live on National TV or Sky. Let's see the div 1 teams only play each other in on four occasions throughout the whole championship campaign until the final. Then see if the quality of the hurling on show puts football in the shade.

This could be taken two ways;


Which one is it?

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on August 15, 2016, 01:51:26 PM
The issue about that comparison is that for many years the 'lesser' counties either didn't bother, or didn't want to, play in the Leinster/Munster/Connacht championship, and therefore just didn't enter teams. The Ring, Rackard and Meagher Cups filled a void, and that has led to these counties fielding teams.

In football, that sort of lack of interest, Kilkenny aside, doesn't exist, so a B/C competition would not be filling a void, it would be creating a separation the the counties don't want.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: screenexile on August 15, 2016, 01:52:10 PM
I think they should run the hurling championship in the same format as the football. Everyone chucked in together, let's see Tyrone v Clare in the first round of a qualifier. Let's see the first round of the Connacht senior hurling championship between Mayo and Roscommon live on National TV or Sky. Let's see the div 1 teams only play each other in on four occasions throughout the whole championship campaign until the final. Then see if the quality of the hurling on show puts football in the shade.

This could be taken two ways;

  • Hurling is an unequal sport with the haves and the have nots but the way hurling is structured means we don't see these uneven contests.
  • Its about time football counties caught themselves on and reduced the number of teams competing for the Sam Maguire as 80% of the counties involved haven't got a snowballs chance of winning it and should be playing in a B championship

Which one is it?

Both... realistically you might get 4 maybe 5 decent hurling matches a year! For some reason it is acceptable to have the hurling tiered system to make sure the best teams play eachother more times.

For some reason it is sacrilege for Football to do the same!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jeepers Creepers on August 15, 2016, 01:56:00 PM
Hurling viewing would be even better if RTE showed in in HD.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on August 15, 2016, 02:00:54 PM
I think they should run the hurling championship in the same format as the football. Everyone chucked in together, let's see Tyrone v Clare in the first round of a qualifier. Let's see the first round of the Connacht senior hurling championship between Mayo and Roscommon live on National TV or Sky. Let's see the div 1 teams only play each other in on four occasions throughout the whole championship campaign until the final. Then see if the quality of the hurling on show puts football in the shade.

This could be taken two ways;

  • Hurling is an unequal sport with the haves and the have nots but the way hurling is structured means we don't see these uneven contests.
  • Its about time football counties caught themselves on and reduced the number of teams competing for the Sam Maguire as 80% of the counties involved haven't got a snowballs chance of winning it and should be playing in a B championship

Which one is it?

Both... realistically you might get 4 maybe 5 decent hurling matches a year! For some reason it is acceptable to have the hurling tiered system to make sure the best teams play eachother more times.

For some reason it is sacrilege for Football to do the same!

There's some very decent, competitive games outside the Liam McCarthy every year as teams are playing at the right level for their ability, you won't see them (unless you go to them) as they're not on TV, but football wise there's a lot of dross put on TV during the first rounds and backdoor games as that's the way its always been.
Hurling is also a cruel sport where a team can be beaten by 10 points and still have been pretty competitive throughout whereas in football a team could be been beaten by 4 points and never looked liked winning..

The two sports are really incomparable and its a debate I find futile, but there is good competitive games in hurling outside the top level, and IMO its time some county boards had a good hard look at themselves and realised their not within an asses roar of winning a Sam Maguire and that the football structures really need revised along the lines of the hurling ones.

Could you imagine Down CB voting for a motion at Congress where they'd be in a tier two competition?

They'd no bother doing it for the hurling.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on August 15, 2016, 02:05:18 PM
The issue about that comparison is that for many years the 'lesser' counties either didn't bother, or didn't want to, play in the Leinster/Munster/Connacht championship, and therefore just didn't enter teams. The Ring, Rackard and Meagher Cups filled a void, and that has led to these counties fielding teams.

In football, that sort of lack of interest, Kilkenny aside, doesn't exist, so a B/C competition would not be filling a void, it would be creating a separation the the counties don't want.

There's as much chance of a dozen or more counties winning an AI football championship as my arse winning a gold at the Olympics for snipe shooting, but them actually realising it would mean acknowledging their own failings and that's not going to happen unless Croke Park takes the lead and forces through a revised championship structure for the football.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Il Bomber Destro on August 15, 2016, 02:06:31 PM
I'm not sure about that. Only Tyrone or Armagh stopped Kerry. For a while, only Tyrone or Kerry stopped Armagh. Tyrone were the weak link.

Down beat them, Donegal beat them, Monaghan should have beaten them, Sligo nearly beat them.

The fact was teams didn't go up against Kerry before games with -15 handicaps. They were plenty of teams who could put it up to them, there are 3/4 teams who could put it up to Dublin and they will probably all start the match at odds of 2/1 or greater. As a competitive spectacle, football is fucked.

As usual you are talking absolute drivel. Dublin only won last years final by a kick of a ball and were taken to a replay in the semi. Donegal were within a kick of a ball of them in the latter stages of last weeks game. A lot of people consider the 70s and early 80s to be the golden period of gaelic football. In that period Kerry were far more dominant than Dublin are now and it certainly wasn't considered to be bad for football as a spectacle. I'm really enjoying watching the dubs at this time because they are the one top team who play the game in a positve way and are always entertaining.

You are quite dumb.

I have quite clearly stated that there are 3 or 4 teams that can give Dublin a game. All you have served to do is repeat that statement in a contrary tone.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on August 15, 2016, 02:31:33 PM
The issue about that comparison is that for many years the 'lesser' counties either didn't bother, or didn't want to, play in the Leinster/Munster/Connacht championship, and therefore just didn't enter teams. The Ring, Rackard and Meagher Cups filled a void, and that has led to these counties fielding teams.

In football, that sort of lack of interest, Kilkenny aside, doesn't exist, so a B/C competition would not be filling a void, it would be creating a separation the the counties don't want.

There's as much chance of a dozen or more counties winning an AI football championship as my arse winning a gold at the Olympics for snipe shooting, but them actually realising it would mean acknowledging their own failings and that's not going to happen unless Croke Park takes the lead and forces through a revised championship structure for the football.


It's not all about winning an All Ireland. It's about competing, and when the Provincial Championships are there, they feel they are able to compete and try and progress within their province.

Why are we bothering our holes sending people to the Olympics when we know we might as well put your arse on the team for snipe shooting? It's because you want to compete at the top level, and I don't think we should be telling teams we don't want them.

In hurling, the counties themselves decided 'f**k it, we won't bother'. That's a different kettle of fish, and that *is* a good reason for B championships. If a number of counties decided not to enter the football championship, then you'd have an appetite for that sort of tiered competition.

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on August 15, 2016, 04:31:48 PM
The issue about that comparison is that for many years the 'lesser' counties either didn't bother, or didn't want to, play in the Leinster/Munster/Connacht championship, and therefore just didn't enter teams. The Ring, Rackard and Meagher Cups filled a void, and that has led to these counties fielding teams.

In football, that sort of lack of interest, Kilkenny aside, doesn't exist, so a B/C competition would not be filling a void, it would be creating a separation the the counties don't want.

There's as much chance of a dozen or more counties winning an AI football championship as my arse winning a gold at the Olympics for snipe shooting, but them actually realising it would mean acknowledging their own failings and that's not going to happen unless Croke Park takes the lead and forces through a revised championship structure for the football.


It's not all about winning an All Ireland. It's about competing, and when the Provincial Championships are there, they feel they are able to compete and try and progress within their province.

Why are we bothering our holes sending people to the Olympics when we know we might as well put your arse on the team for snipe shooting? It's because you want to compete at the top level, and I don't think we should be telling teams we don't want them.

In hurling, the counties themselves decided 'f**k it, we won't bother'. That's a different kettle of fish, and that *is* a good reason for B championships. If a number of counties decided not to enter the football championship, then you'd have an appetite for that sort of tiered competition.



But are they competing? Would Longford or Louth realistically compete with Dublin, then hope for a kind draw with a similar standard county in the backdoor?
Some counties are deluded in terms of thinking they're competing.

As for football orientated county boards deciding not to enter hurling teams, its hardly surprising, is it!

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on August 15, 2016, 04:35:33 PM
No, it's not surprising, but it's a different dynamic to the hurling situation. People say 'look at the tiers in hurling', but counties and players WANT the tiers in hurling. Counties and players don't want the tiers in football.

Now, if Dublin keep mullering teams in Leinster, and that makes teams just decide it's not worth entering, then you'd see an appetite for a B championship. But as it stands, all teams want to enter their provincial championship, and the All Ireland qualifiers, and I say let them. Who are we to tell them they are not entitled to?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on August 15, 2016, 04:54:14 PM
No, it's not surprising, but it's a different dynamic to the hurling situation. People say 'look at the tiers in hurling', but counties and players WANT the tiers in hurling. Counties and players don't want the tiers in football.

Now, if Dublin keep mullering teams in Leinster, and that makes teams just decide it's not worth entering, then you'd see an appetite for a B championship. But as it stands, all teams want to enter their provincial championship, and the All Ireland qualifiers, and I say let them. Who are we to tell them they are not entitled to?

But they won't do that as that is an admission that they are putting all this resource into football and still coming up well short.
But some will gurn when the players decide not to give the commitment or take off to the states for the summer, so some players know they're on a hiding to nothing even if their county board don't..

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on August 15, 2016, 05:19:00 PM
OK. That's a different discussion though :) The players, it should be said, in the vast majority of cases, have not expressed a wish for a tiered structure.

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: BennyHarp on August 15, 2016, 10:28:34 PM
OK. That's a different discussion though :) The players, it should be said, in the vast majority of cases, have not expressed a wish for a tiered structure.

I'm not sure decisions are made by the GAA hierarchy based on the expressed wishes of the players. I don't remember a huge push by the players for the black card or the mark or the new round robin structure. So saying the players don't want it, doesn't mean it couldn't or shouldn't happen. Would players want it if it was the only game in town? It's not as if the tiered system is alien to us, it's fully embedded into the mindset of every player via the club system.

But that's a different discussion, my point about the hurling structure is that we don't generally have to sit through months and months of miss matches, imagine the RTE lads analysing Clare beating Tyrone by 50 points in a live hurling qualifier. The likes of Joe Brolly would have so pioneered so many rule changes that the game would be unrecognisable.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on August 15, 2016, 10:40:57 PM
So you're advocating a change to the football championship to avoid these mismatches that allow Brolly to berate the players and counties involved?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: BennyHarp on August 15, 2016, 10:47:44 PM
So you're advocating a change to the football championship to avoid these mismatches that allow Brolly to berate the players and counties involved?

Aye, that's what I'm saying. 🙄
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on August 15, 2016, 11:07:02 PM
If there's going to be tiered Championships in football - the winners/finalists will should be allowed into the Senior Championship.
As for hurley - 3 good games per year - sure give them the month if June all to themselves to play their little restricted Championships and then send them on their way. :)

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on August 16, 2016, 05:24:30 PM
Rossfan...Ye were beaten by a hurling county in the championship...so on your way!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on August 16, 2016, 05:49:44 PM
Rossfan...Ye were beaten by a hurling county in the championship...so on your way!

That's why he doesn't want them in there! :)
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on August 16, 2016, 06:44:37 PM
In fact hurley Counties should be banned from the football Championships.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on August 16, 2016, 08:02:30 PM
In fact hurley Counties should be banned from the football Championships.

They are! Roscommon be out also on that post  ;D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on August 31, 2016, 03:31:49 PM
Football not in the shade when ut comes to  people attending games it seems.
Nally Terrace tickets were available online this morning for the Hurley final.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on August 31, 2016, 03:32:48 PM
Football not in the shade when ut comes to  people attending games it seems.
Nally Terrace tickets were available online this morning for the Hurley final.

That's what happens when you make hurling the poor relation in 20+ counties, and one team dominates. Beware those people who want to do the same to football.

That said, I'm sure if it was Tipp v Waterford, it would be a full house.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ashman on August 31, 2016, 03:35:03 PM
Football not in the shade when ut comes to  people attending games it seems.
Nally Terrace tickets were available online this morning for the Hurley final.

The population of Tipp and Kilkenny combined is quarter that of Dublin .
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: snoopdog on August 31, 2016, 04:15:32 PM
Football not in the shade when ut comes to  people attending games it seems.
Nally Terrace tickets were available online this morning for the Hurley final.

The population of Tipp and Kilkenny combined is quarter that of Dublin .
Football final tickets regardless of who is playing never go on general sale. I recall tickets were very easy to come by the last time these 2 met in the all ireland final 2011 I think.. actually going for far less than face value outside the ground if I remember correctly.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: From the Bunker on August 31, 2016, 04:55:24 PM
Football not in the shade when ut comes to  people attending games it seems.
Nally Terrace tickets were available online this morning for the Hurley final.

The population of Tipp and Kilkenny combined is quarter that of Dublin .
Football final tickets regardless of who is playing never go on general sale. I recall tickets were very easy to come by the last time these 2 met in the all ireland final 2011 I think.. actually going for far less than face value outside the ground if I remember correctly.

Kilkenny were going for an unprecedented 5 in a row in 2010. The preceding years there was huge demand in Kilkenny for 3 in a row and four in a row tickets. When Kilkenny lost in 2010. The run was burst and naturally the hype of going back to winning one in a row again. This coupled with the expense of the going to AI Finals 5 years in a row (they are expensive for a small family).
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: thewobbler on August 31, 2016, 05:04:26 PM
Football not in the shade when ut comes to  people attending games it seems.
Nally Terrace tickets were available online this morning for the Hurley final.

That's what happens when you make hurling the poor relation in 20+ counties, and one team dominates. Beware those people who want to do the same to football.

That said, I'm sure if it was Tipp v Waterford, it would be a full house.


Football didn't make hurling the poor relation in 20 counties. Hurling did that all by itself by generally being a rubbish game to watch and play.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: AZOffaly on August 31, 2016, 05:11:03 PM
Football not in the shade when ut comes to  people attending games it seems.
Nally Terrace tickets were available online this morning for the Hurley final.

That's what happens when you make hurling the poor relation in 20+ counties, and one team dominates. Beware those people who want to do the same to football.

That said, I'm sure if it was Tipp v Waterford, it would be a full house.


Football didn't make hurling the poor relation in 20 counties. Hurling did that all by itself by generally being a rubbish game to watch and play.

Ara stop talking shite.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on August 31, 2016, 06:27:22 PM
Football not in the shade when ut comes to  people attending games it seems.
Nally Terrace tickets were available online this morning for the Hurley final.

That's what happens when you make hurling the poor relation in 20+ counties, and one team dominates. Beware those people who want to do the same to football.

That said, I'm sure if it was Tipp v Waterford, it would be a full house.


Football didn't make hurling the poor relation in 20 counties.

No hurley stuff round most of Roscommon and we are happy to keep it that way.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Cunny Funt on August 31, 2016, 09:52:19 PM
Football not in the shade when ut comes to  people attending games it seems.
Nally Terrace tickets were available online this morning for the Hurley final.
I'm just after purchasing 5 tickets it seems loads of tickets are still left.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: sligoman2 on August 31, 2016, 09:58:34 PM
Lads
Please cop on for fecks sake.  Schoolboy stuff at best
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: manfromdelmonte on August 31, 2016, 10:05:58 PM
Football not in the shade when ut comes to  people attending games it seems.
Nally Terrace tickets were available online this morning for the Hurley final.

That's what happens when you make hurling the poor relation in 20+ counties, and one team dominates. Beware those people who want to do the same to football.

That said, I'm sure if it was Tipp v Waterford, it would be a full house.


Football didn't make hurling the poor relation in 20 counties.

No hurley stuff round most of Roscommon and we are happy to keep it that way.
right, cause Roscommon are so good at the football

when there were more hurling clubs in the south of the county, Roscommon contested All Ireland finals in football
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on August 31, 2016, 11:04:48 PM
We're not that bad at th'oul football ;)
Chap up the road from us bought 2 hurley final tickets this evening so must be loads available alright.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on August 31, 2016, 11:21:04 PM
Football not in the shade when ut comes to  people attending games it seems.
Nally Terrace tickets were available online this morning for the Hurley final.

That's what happens when you make hurling the poor relation in 20+ counties, and one team dominates. Beware those people who want to do the same to football.

That said, I'm sure if it was Tipp v Waterford, it would be a full house.


Football didn't make hurling the poor relation in 20 counties. Hurling did that all by itself by generally being a rubbish game to watch and play.

Are you Sean Og by any chance?   ;)
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Antrim Coaster on September 01, 2016, 07:39:27 AM
WTF is a 'hurley' final?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Ash Smoker on September 01, 2016, 03:48:24 PM
WTF is a 'hurley' final?
I was about to ask the same thing. Is Rossfan an ex-pat?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on September 01, 2016, 03:54:27 PM
What would a Roscommon man know about hurling anyway.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on September 01, 2016, 04:05:00 PM
What would a Roscommon man know about hurling anyway.

There were a family of Kelly's from Oran in Roscommon could hurl with anyone in their day.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on September 01, 2016, 04:05:47 PM
What would a Roscommon man know about hurling anyway.
What would a Roscommon man know about anything......(apart from riding sheep)
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on September 01, 2016, 04:14:50 PM
What would a Roscommon man know about hurling anyway.

There were a family of Kelly's from Oran in Roscommon could hurl with anyone in their day.

Was there 15 of them?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on September 01, 2016, 04:19:15 PM
What would a Roscommon man know about hurling anyway.
What would a Roscommon man know about anything......(apart from riding sheep)
At least we weren't voted the worst accent in Ireland like you shower of faction fighters.
Ours was voted 5th nicest by the way.

And our shtick bucks won the Nicky Packard last year.

As for the Nordies and ex Pat !!! Humour still hasn't crossed the Black Pig's dyke.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on September 01, 2016, 04:23:05 PM
What would a Roscommon man know about hurling anyway.

There were a family of Kelly's from Oran in Roscommon could hurl with anyone in their day.

Was there 15 of them?

2 or three IIRC.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on September 01, 2016, 04:42:56 PM
IIRC one of them lads used to travel up from Cork for training twice a week for years.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on September 03, 2016, 02:37:58 PM
IIRC one of them lads used to travel up from Cork for training twice a week for years.

You are some clown rossfan. Beaten by a hurling county and on here mouthing claptrap about football. Yer useless at both games. Tipp would have baten ye up the yard without their sticks aswell.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on September 04, 2016, 04:21:32 PM
Tight stuff here, Kilkenny 0.12 Tipp 0.;14
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: StGallsGAA on September 04, 2016, 04:49:41 PM
Kilkenny getting ripped a new one here. Will do well to turn it around. One way traffic for past 15 mins
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on September 04, 2016, 05:10:20 PM
I dunno lads.
Apparently that was an unbelievable game of hurling.
Personally I found it all a bit flat.
Not within an asses roar of the two KK v Waterford games.
Tipp were full value for the win though.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on September 04, 2016, 05:12:48 PM
It was definitely a flat final and when it was close it was still interesting but it never took off and was done as a contest a long way out.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on September 04, 2016, 05:24:13 PM
There is some contrast between the media and supporters willingness to talk up hurling versus the willingness to talk down football.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on September 04, 2016, 05:46:38 PM
There is some contrast between the media and supporters willingness to talk up hurling versus the willingness to talk down football.

Last weeks Dublin v Kerry semi was talked up by supporters and the media because it deserved to be!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on September 04, 2016, 05:58:42 PM
But in football, it has to be a legitimately great game before people will do that.
In hurling, the default position is "This is an unbelievable game".
I didn't think today was anything special but most people are raving about it.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on September 04, 2016, 06:08:38 PM
So is everyone else wrong then? Who is to blame for the 'default' position? What wrong with being positive when players go out and play to the best of their ability and show true honest sportsmanship.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on September 04, 2016, 06:20:27 PM
But it wasn't a great game today. In saying that I think we get too bogged down in whether games were good or not. It wasn't a great game but it was a very good performance by Tipp.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Avondhu star on September 04, 2016, 07:07:37 PM
I suppose we were waiting for a KK comeback that in our hearts knew wouldnt happen. Tipp showed right from the start that they were not going to be messed with. Waterford in both games in the semi final let evrtyone know that KK were there for the taking. I saw Cody look at his bench a few times and I got the impresssion he was thinking there was nothing there that would change anything. He played Blanchfield Kelly Walsh but the fact isthat they are not the panel they were. You just cant expect to replace JJ Delaney Sheflin Tommy Walsh overnight
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: StGallsGAA on September 04, 2016, 07:31:38 PM
Tony probably reckons Cody is an overpaid bluffer who's been found out today! :D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: INDIANA on September 04, 2016, 07:48:04 PM
But it wasn't a great game today. In saying that I think we get too bogged down in whether games were good or not. It wasn't a great game but it was a very good performance by Tipp.

It was a good game and I enjoyed it immensely. It's always a great game if your county wins. ;D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on September 04, 2016, 09:26:31 PM
Cody did make a serious mistake though not changing the fullback for Hickey,Tipp no.14  scored 8/9 from play, the only way Tipp were going to win the day was him having a stormer, galway held him in the semi and Tipp struggled to get over the line with late goals
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: LilySavage on September 04, 2016, 09:53:24 PM
Just a heads up that Tipp no. 14 is Seamie Callanan ..as you critique Brian Cody's performance today
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on September 04, 2016, 10:06:58 PM
Just a heads up that Tipp no. 14 is Seamie Callanan ..as you critique Brian Cody's performance today

I didn't think it was a great game, too many basic errors for that, but it was interesting as Kilkenny were hanging in when they had no right to, but Tipp were the superior team for most of the contest.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Wildweasel74 on September 04, 2016, 10:11:15 PM
I know who he is but my spelling of his surname be suspect lol
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: J70 on September 04, 2016, 10:23:59 PM
WFUV, a National Public Radio station broadcast by Fordham University in NYC, had the hurling final on live today. Sounded like Marty Morrisey doing the commentary. A pleasant surprise given that I had to leave the house and head out for the day in the car! They usually do Irish music on Sunday mornings/early afternoons.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jell 0 Biafra on September 05, 2016, 02:27:52 AM
Totally meh.  First half tight, but not really that great; second half one way traffic.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: dec on September 05, 2016, 03:09:17 AM
WFUV, a National Public Radio station broadcast by Fordham University in NYC, had the hurling final on live today. Sounded like Marty Morrisey doing the commentary. A pleasant surprise given that I had to leave the house and head out for the day in the car! They usually do Irish music on Sunday mornings/early afternoons.

The have been broadcasting both All Ireland finals for a few years now. I have listened a few times.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on September 05, 2016, 07:42:14 AM
I really enjoyed it. Maybe not a classic but still a good game and there were some great scores. The atmosphere inside Croke Park was fantastic also.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: theskull1 on September 05, 2016, 07:50:47 AM
With KK looking a bit ragged in places there's no way it could be called a cracker, but there was a massive amount to enjoy during the watching of the game. The physical 50 50 battles, the fielding, the wrists, the pure commitment to the cause all plenty of heart on your sleeve stuff just what the crowd (most favouring tipp) wanted and got in spades

I really enjoyed it
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hound on September 05, 2016, 08:34:46 AM
I thought Tipp were superb.

Odd that Cody only used 2 subs and made no changes to full back or full forward lines
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on September 05, 2016, 09:57:20 AM
I thought Tipp were superb.

Odd that Cody only used 2 subs and made no changes to full back or full forward lines

His half forwards, midfield and half backs were the ones in trouble. The Tipp lads were allowed to put the ball into the spaces for Callanan, McGrath and Co to run onto, very hard for any fullback line to do anything about that. If anything Paul Murphy had as poor a game as he's ever had and they weren't getting the basics right, lifting the ball seemed to be a struggle and the passing sloppy. The Kilkenny forwards were getting slow, poor ball into them with only Paudie Walsh trying to get good ball to them.

Larkin went off to be replaced by Lester Ryan and how Joyce started was beyond me as he was very poor in the first match against Waterford, big Lennon had some great games at centre back in the league and had a superb Munster final, so unless he was injured I don't know how he wasn't handed the No.6 jersey when it was decided to push Fogarty back into the middle of the park when Fennelly was out injured.

With the minors and U21's exiting the Leinster Championships early, this could be the end of Kilkenny dominance, but they're still in the mix for a few years yet.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on September 05, 2016, 10:02:20 AM
WFUV, a National Public Radio station broadcast by Fordham University in NYC, had the hurling final on live today. Sounded like Marty Morrisey doing the commentary. A pleasant surprise given that I had to leave the house and head out for the day in the car! They usually do Irish music on Sunday mornings/early afternoons.

It can't have sounded that much like him so.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on June 10, 2017, 08:17:43 PM
Great game between Wexford and Kilkenny.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: omagh_gael on June 10, 2017, 08:41:53 PM
Great game between Wexford and Kilkenny.

The Cork v Tipp game earlier was much better ;)
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on June 10, 2017, 09:46:15 PM
The deliberate fouling was something else!!!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on June 11, 2017, 12:20:03 AM
I love the negativity around here. Great win for wexford, not a classic but So much better than any football weve seen this year.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on June 11, 2017, 12:28:58 AM
Plenty of D1 games were better in football.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: From the Bunker on June 11, 2017, 12:36:37 AM
Plenty of D1 games were better in football.

How dare thee sayeth that the Big Ball game could be better somwtime than any small ball game!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on June 11, 2017, 02:02:09 AM
Plenty of D1 games were better in football.

Plenty of good D1 hurling games too and some better too no doubt but this was Championship stuff. Surely this is the time of year for the good games.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on June 11, 2017, 08:21:33 AM
Why are hurling people so insecure?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: omagh_gael on June 11, 2017, 08:26:03 AM
Hurling enjoys a significant advantage in the quality stakes as the top teams play eachother much more regularly and earlier in the season. In football we haven't had an all division one scale and, in fact, there has only been two division 1 v division 2 games  (Tyrone v Derry and Monaghan v Fermanagh). Both these division two teams were also relegated. This weekend has Galway v Mayo and Monaghan v Cavan. Not saying these will be classics but the quality/competitiveness surely will rise.

With the regression of the cats there now is genuinely half a dozen teams that could win the AI in hurling. It really is shaping up to be a great championship for that code.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: From the Bunker on June 11, 2017, 09:49:39 AM
Why are hurling people so insecure?

Because its a minority sport that has little or no catchment in North Leinster, Connacht and Ulster. It survives off Munster really. Winning an AI is like winning a Provincial title in the amount of people that really appreciate it. It's a great game and has been terribly promoted on the ground by the GAA in the areas named. Headquarters were too interested in the Dublin Cashcow to care about that!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on June 11, 2017, 10:16:31 AM
Why are hurling people so insecure?

Because its a minority sport that has little or no catchment in North Leinster, Connacht and Ulster. It survives off Munster really. Winning an AI is like winning a Provincial title in the amount of people that really appreciate it. It's a great game and has been terribly promoted on the ground by the GAA in the areas named. Headquarters were too interested in the Dublin Cashcow to care about that!

Football has always been the number one sport in the country so of course every other sport is crying out for attention and nipping at its heels.

Easy to get tight games in May in a sport where only six counties even take it seriously.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Fear Bun Na Sceilpe on June 11, 2017, 11:33:35 AM
The matches in Croke Park yesterday were better than most football games. Certainly better than the Tipp v Cork game.  Pity the GAA don't do more to promote the occasion
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: dclane on June 11, 2017, 11:53:51 AM
Why are hurling people so insecure?
Going by the comments on here I'd say it's the football boys that are insecure.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on June 11, 2017, 12:09:34 PM
Why are hurling people so insecure?
Going by the comments on here I'd say it's the football boys that are insecure.
What have we to be insecure about?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: OgraAnDun on June 11, 2017, 12:53:37 PM
Why are hurling people so insecure?
Going by the comments on here I'd say it's the football boys that are insecure.
What have we to be insecure about?

Many of the games are sh*te to watch.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: twohands!!! on June 11, 2017, 07:42:45 PM
Hurling enjoys a significant advantage in the quality stakes as the top teams play eachother much more regularly and earlier in the season. In football we haven't had an all division one scale and, in fact, there has only been two division 1 v division 2 games  (Tyrone v Derry and Monaghan v Fermanagh). Both these division two teams were also relegated. This weekend has Galway v Mayo and Monaghan v Cavan. Not saying these will be classics but the quality/competitiveness surely will rise.

With the regression of the cats there now is genuinely half a dozen teams that could win the AI in hurling. It really is shaping up to be a great championship for that code.

Yeah if the hurling championship had the Division 3 and Division 4 teams playing games against the Division 1 and Division 2 teams you would be hearing a lot less about the quality of hurling.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on June 12, 2017, 12:47:24 PM
Hurling enjoys a significant advantage in the quality stakes as the top teams play eachother much more regularly and earlier in the season. In football we haven't had an all division one scale and, in fact, there has only been two division 1 v division 2 games  (Tyrone v Derry and Monaghan v Fermanagh). Both these division two teams were also relegated. This weekend has Galway v Mayo and Monaghan v Cavan. Not saying these will be classics but the quality/competitiveness surely will rise.

With the regression of the cats there now is genuinely half a dozen teams that could win the AI in hurling. It really is shaping up to be a great championship for that code.

Yeah if the hurling championship had the Division 3 and Division 4 teams playing games against the Division 1 and Division 2 teams you would be hearing a lot less about the quality of hurling.

Not sure what your point is, is it that football realistically needs to cop on and divide up into two or three separate championship grades like hurling or that hurling is masking its issues with these graded championships?

IMO there's a bit of truth in both.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on August 06, 2017, 07:17:53 PM
👍
Great game compared to that muck yesterday.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: BennyHarp on August 06, 2017, 07:54:39 PM
👍
Great game compared to that muck yesterday.

Such a pity Galway weren't playing a Division 3 team. It'd have been class entertainment!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on August 06, 2017, 08:07:39 PM
Hurling is more skilful. Massed defences dont work . Offaly had 2 sweepers and 2 midfielders playing back and still got hammered.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: mrhardyannual on August 06, 2017, 08:23:54 PM
No doubt about it but a good hurling match will always top a good football game. Hated when Railway Cup hurling final or Club hurling final were put on before the football as it made the football look so slow and lacking in skill.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: RedHand88 on August 06, 2017, 08:27:11 PM
👍
Great game compared to that muck yesterday.

Hurling has a serious inferiority complex.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: snoopdog on August 06, 2017, 08:51:18 PM
👍
Great game compared to that muck yesterday.

Hurling has a serious inferiority complex.
[/quote
Totally agree. The hurling crowd are always at this Craic. 
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on August 06, 2017, 08:58:21 PM
The only thing great about that hurley game today was the closeness of the contest and the dramatic winner.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on August 06, 2017, 08:58:46 PM
Its just a bit of fun lads. Sure Cork people are known to have inferiority complexs yet think they are greater than everyone else. Theres a thin line between greatness and mediocrity.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: thejuice on August 06, 2017, 10:27:51 PM
Why do we need to bring this crap thread up again. Can't we just be glad to get some good games at all.

Yes today's hurling match was awesome.

Yes, this weekends football was dull.

The fact is I've sat through plenty of dull hurling matches that were over after 10 minutes, football at the moment is just lacking in competitiveness at the moment. Hurling was in a similar spot when Kilkenny were winning all round them. Soon enough we'll have more teams up to Dublins level but we'll just have to grin and bear it for now.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Fear ón Srath Bán on August 06, 2017, 10:31:45 PM
Agree with thejuice -- this is not the place for footballing fecking self-flagellation! Go to the hurling forum if that's what floats your boat.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: armaghniac on August 06, 2017, 10:47:38 PM
Why do we need to bring this crap thread up again. Can't we just be glad to get some good games at all.

Yes today's hurling match was awesome.

Yes, this weekends football was dull.

The fact is I've sat through plenty of dull hurling matches that were over after 10 minutes, football at the moment is just lacking in competitiveness at the moment. Hurling was in a similar spot when Kilkenny were winning all round them. Soon enough we'll have more teams up to Dublins level but we'll just have to grin and bear it for now.

Unlike Dublin Kilkenny had no unfair advantage, they were just better.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: trileacman on August 06, 2017, 10:49:09 PM
Why do we need to bring this crap thread up again. Can't we just be glad to get some good games at all.

Yes today's hurling match was awesome.

Yes, this weekends football was dull.

The fact is I've sat through plenty of dull hurling matches that were over after 10 minutes, football at the moment is just lacking in competitiveness at the moment. Hurling was in a similar spot when Kilkenny were winning all round them. Soon enough we'll have more teams up to Dublins level but we'll just have to grin and bear it for now.

Unlike Dublin Kilkenny had no unfair advantage, they were just better.

Agreed
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on August 06, 2017, 11:45:29 PM
The Sunday Game Retweeted
Joe Brolly
Joe Brolly @JoeBrolly1993
·
6h
THANK GOD FOR HURLING
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on August 07, 2017, 12:10:51 AM
It was entertaining stuff for the last 10 minutes, but by no means a great or even a 'very good' game of hurling.
The gushing praise any half decent game of hurling gets is a small bit embarrassing at this stage.
It's like the entire country just agrees to pretend it was a great game, because well, it's 'the greatest game in the world'.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Asal Mor on August 07, 2017, 07:31:09 AM
I was there and I've never known excitement like it. Was a nervous wreck through the whole second half. And the joy/relief when the winner went over and the final whistle blew - no words. Over the moon for Joe too. There was plenty of sloppiness but that just added to the tension and drama.

Juice said it, why do we need to bring this crap thread up again?

Football is a great game, but obviously the massive gap between the top few and the rest is causing some dull games.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: RedHand88 on August 07, 2017, 08:04:51 AM
I was there and I've never known excitement like it. Was a nervous wreck through the whole second half. And the joy/relief when the winner went over and the final whistle blew - no words. Over the moon for Joe too. There was plenty of sloppiness but that just added to the tension and drama.

Juice said it, why do we need to bring this crap thread up again?

Football is a great game, but obviously the massive gap between the top few and the rest is causing some dull games.

Off the top of my head I'm thinking of canavan free v Armagh 05, cluxton v Kerry 2011, coc miss in last year's final...
And the gap is worse in hurling. It's that bad that half the counties in the country don't even bother entering.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on August 07, 2017, 08:32:42 AM
I was there and I've never known excitement like it. Was a nervous wreck through the whole second half. And the joy/relief when the winner went over and the final whistle blew - no words. Over the moon for Joe too. There was plenty of sloppiness but that just added to the tension and drama.

Juice said it, why do we need to bring this crap thread up again?

Football is a great game, but obviously the massive gap between the top few and the rest is causing some dull games.

Off the top of my head I'm thinking of canavan free v Armagh 05, cluxton v Kerry 2011, coc miss in last year's final...
And the gap is worse in hurling. It's that bad that half the counties in the country don't even bother entering.
This year the provincial finals and 3 out of 4 quarter finals were over after 50 minutes

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on August 07, 2017, 09:03:14 AM
I was there and I've never known excitement like it. Was a nervous wreck through the whole second half. And the joy/relief when the winner went over and the final whistle blew - no words. Over the moon for Joe too. There was plenty of sloppiness but that just added to the tension and drama.

Juice said it, why do we need to bring this crap thread up again?

Football is a great game, but obviously the massive gap between the top few and the rest is causing some dull games.
Look at the reaction it gets  ;D
That's why...
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: punt kick on August 07, 2017, 09:38:54 AM
Was at the double bore feast on Saturday and the two matches yesterday, no comparison in terms of skill and excitement - have my tickets for next Sunday, can't wait expect it to be another clinker.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on August 07, 2017, 10:37:21 AM
I was there and I've never known excitement like it. Was a nervous wreck through the whole second half. And the joy/relief when the winner went over and the final whistle blew - no words. Over the moon for Joe too. There was plenty of sloppiness but that just added to the tension and drama.

Juice said it, why do we need to bring this crap thread up again?

Football is a great game, but obviously the massive gap between the top few and the rest is causing some dull games.

Off the top of my head I'm thinking of canavan free v Armagh 05, cluxton v Kerry 2011, coc miss in last year's final...
And the gap is worse in hurling. It's that bad that half the counties in the country don't even bother entering.

I'd agree with that as you're entirely correct, but therein lies the problems with the football mismatches that a lot of football orientated county boards aren't prepared to accept. Some footballers themselves also can't accept it either if the truth was told and are holding on to that mystical good run that comes once in a blue moon when they get to play against one of the big teams in Croke Park even if they are hockeyed.

In hurling you play at a level you are competitive at until you progress up through the ranks for a crack at the big teams. That has proven illusive for most at the moment, but then again with three counties having dominated hurling since its inception into the GAA you can hardly go blaming the league and championship structures with so many other mitigating circumstances.
Footballing orientated county boards had no issue with tiered hurling championships but it would be a major reality check if they voted for a tiered football championship as you'd be admitting that after putting all your efforts into football and are still shite and that's that!


Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on August 07, 2017, 01:50:52 PM
There are 16 teams of acceptable standard in the hurling. There are too in  football but nobody wants to admit it.
In hurling the barrier is skill. In football it seems to be S&C
I think football is in crisis.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: punt kick on August 07, 2017, 01:52:39 PM
Two is a bit harsh - Tyrone are there or there abouts also.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on August 07, 2017, 02:02:56 PM
There are 16 teams of acceptable standard in the hurling. There are too in  football but nobody wants to admit it.
In hurling the barrier is skill. In football it seems to be S&C
I think football is in crisis.

16 hurling teams of acceptable standard but only 2 in football, is that a joke?

Football is a far more skilful game than it's given credit for and scoring is much more difficult. However, it's difficulty to make an argument for football being a good spectacle the way it's being played. I think hurling is a poor spectacle than it used to be too but football is gone way back I'm afraid.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Hardy on August 07, 2017, 02:11:01 PM
16 in hurling, 16 in football is the sense of what he said.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on August 07, 2017, 02:19:49 PM
There are 16 teams of acceptable standard in the hurling. There are too in  football but nobody wants to admit it.
In hurling the barrier is skill. In football it seems to be S&C
I think football is in crisis.

16 hurling teams of acceptable standard but only 2 in football, is that a joke?

Football is a far more skilful game than it's given credit for and scoring is much more difficult. However, it's difficulty to make an argument for football being a good spectacle the way it's being played. I think hurling is a poor spectacle than it used to be too but football is gone way back I'm afraid.

The demise of what will be looked upon as a great Kilkenny team has opened up hurling and from yesterday you could realistically say that all of Cork, Waterford, Galway and Tipp would have a good chance of AI glory and even then if the likes of Clare, Kilkenny and to a lesser extent Limerick get their team play sorted they've the hurlers in their ranks to do the same without people saying it would be a shock that they won the AI. I'd have Wexford and Dublin just below that bracket

Football realistically is between Dublin and Kerry and possibly Tyrone. Mayo and Roscommon seem to be a bit lower down the rankings with a bundle of average enough teams capable of beating each other, but not within an asses roar of the serious contenders. Donegal have fallen drastically this year.

Getting beat 6 points in football IMO would be a comfortable enough victory, whereas in hurling a 6 point margin can still be a very competitive game as like you say scoring is easier to achieve due to the distances a score can be got from.

Scoring forwards it seems are like hens teeth in football irrespective of S&C. The two teams with the better ones are top of the pile, Dublin and Kerry.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on August 07, 2017, 02:24:00 PM
There are 16 teams of acceptable standard in the hurling. There are too in  football but nobody wants to admit it.
In hurling the barrier is skill. In football it seems to be S&C
I think football is in crisis.

16 hurling teams of acceptable standard but only 2 in football, is that a joke?

Football is a far more skilful game than it's given credit for and scoring is much more difficult. However, it's difficulty to make an argument for football being a good spectacle the way it's being played. I think hurling is a poor spectacle than it used to be too but football is gone way back I'm afraid.
2 is spelt two.
Too means also

The game is mutant. It has been pushed to the limit by various pressures and there is a certain amount of dark stuff going on behind the scenes to get bodies ready for competition. The rules need to be revised. You cannot alienate the spectators who keep the whole circus going.

Rugby League is designed to be interesting.  Gaelic has meandered somewhere else.   
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Zulu on August 07, 2017, 03:20:29 PM
There are 16 teams of acceptable standard in the hurling. There are too in  football but nobody wants to admit it.
In hurling the barrier is skill. In football it seems to be S&C
I think football is in crisis.

16 hurling teams of acceptable standard but only 2 in football, is that a joke?

Football is a far more skilful game than it's given credit for and scoring is much more difficult. However, it's difficulty to make an argument for football being a good spectacle the way it's being played. I think hurling is a poor spectacle than it used to be too but football is gone way back I'm afraid.
2 is spelt two.
Too means also

The game is mutant. It has been pushed to the limit by various pressures and there is a certain amount of dark stuff going on behind the scenes to get bodies ready for competition. The rules need to be revised. You cannot alienate the spectators who keep the whole circus going.

Rugby League is designed to be interesting.  Gaelic has meandered somewhere else.

Thanks for that seafoid but I had presumed your 'too' was a spelling error as your sentence doesn't make much sense as written, However, spelling and structure aside, it's ridiculous to suggest there are 16 teams of acceptable standard in hurling. There are none in Ulster, one in Connacht and three in Leinster. Football definitely has problems but there are way more competitive teams. Hurling is improving in that regard but Wexford were comfortably beaten by Waterford so genuine All Ireland challengers are still thin on the ground.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: armaghniac on August 07, 2017, 04:00:30 PM
There are 16 teams of acceptable standard in the hurling. There are too in  football but nobody wants to admit it.
In hurling the barrier is skill. In football it seems to be S&C
I think football is in crisis.

16 hurling teams of acceptable standard but only 2 in football, is that a joke?

Football is a far more skilful game than it's given credit for and scoring is much more difficult. However, it's difficulty to make an argument for football being a good spectacle the way it's being played. I think hurling is a poor spectacle than it used to be too but football is gone way back I'm afraid.
2 is spelt two.
Too means also

The game is mutant. It has been pushed to the limit by various pressures and there is a certain amount of dark stuff going on behind the scenes to get bodies ready for competition. The rules need to be revised. You cannot alienate the spectators who keep the whole circus going.

Rugby League is designed to be interesting.  Gaelic has meandered somewhere else.

Thanks for that seafoid but I had presumed your 'too' was a spelling error as your sentence doesn't make much sense as written, However, spelling and structure aside, it's ridiculous to suggest there are 16 teams of acceptable standard in hurling. There are none in Ulster, one in Connacht and three in Leinster. Football definitely has problems but there are way more competitive teams. Hurling is improving in that regard but Wexford were comfortably beaten by Waterford so genuine All Ireland challengers are still thin on the ground.

If the 8th team in hurling played the 16th, the latter would never win if they played every day for a week.
The 16th team in football could beat the 8th placed on 2 or 3 of those days.

In hurling the semis are fairly even, but yet do not include two recent winners Clare and Kilkenny.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on August 07, 2017, 04:17:56 PM
I think at the start of the year the list of contenders for the hurling wouldn't be that different to football except there wouldn't be such a gap between the top and second tier. Obviously the undercard for football is much longer but when did that ever make a difference to Sam ownership ?   Clare would have been maybe 5th or 6th choice in 2013 and they ended up winning the hurling. With Kilkenny rebuilding there should be a bit more variety as well.
Football has been a closed shop for a while.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: sid waddell on August 07, 2017, 04:52:00 PM
There are 16 teams of acceptable standard in the hurling. There are too in  football but nobody wants to admit it.
In hurling the barrier is skill. In football it seems to be S&C
I think football is in crisis.

16 hurling teams of acceptable standard but only 2 in football, is that a joke?

Football is a far more skilful game than it's given credit for and scoring is much more difficult. However, it's difficulty to make an argument for football being a good spectacle the way it's being played. I think hurling is a poor spectacle than it used to be too but football is gone way back I'm afraid.
On the contrary.

Gaelic football at its best as played in this decade has been a spectacular spectacle.

Dublin v Kerry 2013 and 2016, Dublin v Donegal 2014, Dublin v Mayo 2012, 2015 and 2016, Kerry v Mayo 2014 (2), all have been incredible spectacles.

Simply put, some counties take the game more seriously than others.

We all know which counties take it more seriously.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: RedHand88 on August 07, 2017, 04:56:56 PM
There are 16 teams of acceptable standard in the hurling. There are too in  football but nobody wants to admit it.
In hurling the barrier is skill. In football it seems to be S&C
I think football is in crisis.

16 hurling teams of acceptable standard but only 2 in football, is that a joke?

Football is a far more skilful game than it's given credit for and scoring is much more difficult. However, it's difficulty to make an argument for football being a good spectacle the way it's being played. I think hurling is a poor spectacle than it used to be too but football is gone way back I'm afraid.
On the contrary.

Gaelic football at its best as played in this decade has been a spectacular spectacle.

Dublin v Kerry 2013 and 2016, Dublin v Donegal 2014, Dublin v Mayo 2012, 2015 and 2016, Kerry v Mayo 2014 (2), all have been incredible spectacles.

Simply put, some counties take the game more seriously than others.

We all know which counties take it more seriously.

We've had more real good games at the late stages of the championship in this decade when compared to last decade. Last decade had 2 top quality teams, this decade has had 4, arguably 5 if you count tyrone and the decade isnt over yet.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: sid waddell on August 07, 2017, 05:07:54 PM
There are 16 teams of acceptable standard in the hurling. There are too in  football but nobody wants to admit it.
In hurling the barrier is skill. In football it seems to be S&C
I think football is in crisis.

16 hurling teams of acceptable standard but only 2 in football, is that a joke?

Football is a far more skilful game than it's given credit for and scoring is much more difficult. However, it's difficulty to make an argument for football being a good spectacle the way it's being played. I think hurling is a poor spectacle than it used to be too but football is gone way back I'm afraid.
On the contrary.

Gaelic football at its best as played in this decade has been a spectacular spectacle.

Dublin v Kerry 2013 and 2016, Dublin v Donegal 2014, Dublin v Mayo 2012, 2015 and 2016, Kerry v Mayo 2014 (2), all have been incredible spectacles.

Simply put, some counties take the game more seriously than others.

We all know which counties take it more seriously.

We've had more real good games at the late stages of the championship in this decade when compared to last decade. Last decade had 2 top quality teams, this decade has had 4, arguably 5 if you count tyrone and the decade isnt over yet.

The three games of the last decade which were played at the real top level were Tyrone v Kerry 2005 and 2008 and Tyrone v Armagh 2005.

There were others that were very good but a notch below like Armagh v Dublin 2002 and Dublin v Tyrone in 2005.

But overall, the top games in this decade have been at a higher level than any of the previous. They've been wars, but they have been glorious wars.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on August 07, 2017, 05:27:08 PM
Quantitatively how would one go about proving the superiority of this decade over all others?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: macdanger2 on August 07, 2017, 07:02:53 PM
Plenty of good games that don't get the coverage - Derry v tipp last year was a cracker. Offaly v Longford (or westmeath?)  last year or the year before as well?

It's the mismatches that create a bad impression
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: BennyHarp on August 20, 2017, 05:16:48 PM
There's nothing better than a good game of football between two evenly matched teams. 😀
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: thewobbler on August 20, 2017, 07:22:23 PM
Hurling can suck my balls
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: johnneycool on August 21, 2017, 09:13:08 AM
Hurling can suck my balls

If you had any you'd have played hurling    ;)

Oh, that was indeed a good football game yesterday. Couldn't stay til the end though.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on September 10, 2017, 04:43:56 PM
Camogie is some pile of shite anyway.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on September 10, 2017, 04:48:04 PM
Camogie is some pile of shite anyway.

A pile of shite would be a good description of your post. I've seen plenty of good games of camogie. The regressive attitude to both women's games here is like peering through a port-hole into the 1960s.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on September 10, 2017, 04:57:17 PM
Camogie is some pile of shite anyway.

A pile of shite would be a good description of your post. I've seen plenty of good games of camogie. The regressive attitude to both women's games here is like peering through a port-hole into the 1960s.
Sorry, should I pretend to like them?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on September 10, 2017, 05:17:50 PM
Camogie is some pile of shite anyway.

A pile of shite would be a good description of your post. I've seen plenty of good games of camogie. The regressive attitude to both women's games here is like peering through a port-hole into the 1960s.
Sorry, should I pretend to like them?

I suppose you won't be commenting on Cork's equaliser there?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on September 10, 2017, 05:25:13 PM
Camogie is some pile of shite anyway.

A pile of shite would be a good description of your post. I've seen plenty of good games of camogie. The regressive attitude to both women's games here is like peering through a port-hole into the 1960s.
Sorry, should I pretend to like them?

I suppose you won't be commenting on Cork's equaliser there?
Saw the winner. Calamitous defending.
Slow, error-ridden horseshite IMO.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on September 10, 2017, 05:28:42 PM
Camogie is some pile of shite anyway.

A pile of shite would be a good description of your post. I've seen plenty of good games of camogie. The regressive attitude to both women's games here is like peering through a port-hole into the 1960s.
Sorry, should I pretend to like them?

I suppose you won't be commenting on Cork's equaliser there?
Saw the winner. Calamitous defending.
Slow, error-ridden horseshite IMO.

Not missing a chance to live down to the caricature.

Good second half in the game you decided to use as a punch bag. Sin è.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: sid waddell on September 10, 2017, 05:37:54 PM
Camogie is some pile of shite anyway.

A pile of shite would be a good description of your post. I've seen plenty of good games of camogie. The regressive attitude to both women's games here is like peering through a port-hole into the 1960s.
@Syferus - Women's sport needs patronising dinosaurs like you like its players need a hole in the head.

You're strictly from the "ah sure aren't they grand girls" school of "praise".

A walking cliche.




Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: DuffleKing on September 10, 2017, 06:39:26 PM
There are 16 teams of acceptable standard in the hurling. There are too in  football but nobody wants to admit it.
In hurling the barrier is skill. In football it seems to be S&C
I think football is in crisis.

Name them
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on September 10, 2017, 08:32:06 PM
Camogie is some pile of shite anyway.

A pile of shite would be a good description of your post. I've seen plenty of good games of camogie. The regressive attitude to both women's games here is like peering through a port-hole into the 1960s.
Sorry, should I pretend to like them?

No but Strange that you would bring up your dislike for a camogie match in this thread to make a point.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: under the bar on September 10, 2017, 08:37:38 PM
Camogie is some pile of shite anyway.

Said much like a man whose contribution to sport is his view from the armchair or high stool!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on September 10, 2017, 08:41:42 PM
Why? As far as I can see, the point of this thread is to discuss which Gaelic sports are good spectacles and which are not. This appears to be the primary theme from the beginning.

Therefore, I thought it the most apt thread for my comment.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on September 10, 2017, 08:42:13 PM
Camogie is some pile of shite anyway.

Said much like a man whose contribution to sport is his view from the armchair or high stool!
You thought it was good?
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on September 10, 2017, 09:06:08 PM
Why? As far as I can see, the point of this thread is to discuss which Gaelic sports are good spectacles and which are not. This appears to be the primary theme from the beginning.

Therefore, I thought it the most apt thread for my comment.

The thread is about hurling and football and not comparing camogie and ladies football. If you think Ladies football puts camogie in the shade then start another thread. If you are comparing hurling with ladies football or camogie with mens football then I feel sorry for you.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: hardstation on September 10, 2017, 09:09:57 PM
Oh, women don't even deserve to be in the same thread as the men now!
You'll have them rattled now.

I've never known the thread police to be such sticklers either.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: sid waddell on September 10, 2017, 09:13:04 PM
Why? As far as I can see, the point of this thread is to discuss which Gaelic sports are good spectacles and which are not. This appears to be the primary theme from the beginning.

Therefore, I thought it the most apt thread for my comment.

The thread is about hurling and football and not comparing camogie and ladies football. If you think Ladies football puts camogie in the shade then start another thread. If you are comparing hurling with ladies football or camogie with mens football then I feel sorry for you.
The media that cover camogie and women's Gaelic football regularly compare them in favourable terms to hurling and men's Gaelic football.

If the media that cover these games do so, it's a more than legitimate topic of discussion.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: manfromdelmonte on September 10, 2017, 10:02:02 PM
county camogie has gone very defensive lately - low scoring
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: mrhardyannual on September 11, 2017, 09:57:59 AM
The standards of Camogie and Ladies Football have greatly improved over the past decade. Being from a relatively non-hurling county I would rarely have watched the camogie final but was greatly impressed with the quality on show yesterday. Ladies football needs a look at its rules as most teams are being coached in tackling on the same basis as men's football but efforts to rip the ball etc are being blown by some refs and ignored by others. The same applies to the physical contact rule with some blowing for minimal contact and others reffing as per GAA rules.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: screenexile on September 18, 2017, 02:05:37 PM
Not much talk on here today . . . I thought yesterdays game was far and away a better match than the Hurling Final!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Jinxy on September 18, 2017, 06:43:48 PM
+1
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Dinny Breen on September 18, 2017, 06:54:05 PM
+2
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on September 18, 2017, 06:57:20 PM
+3
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Kuwabatake Sanjuro on September 18, 2017, 07:40:48 PM
Not much talk on here today . . . I thought yesterdays game was far and away a better match than the Hurling Final!

I agree that the football was a better game but the Hurling didn't leave the majority of the GAA public depressed and empty at the result of it.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: laoislad on September 18, 2017, 07:57:39 PM
Not much talk on here today . . . I thought yesterdays game was far and away a better match than the Hurling Final!
One good game a year.. ..
Hurling Championship was far better over all.
Even the Camogie final was better than most of the football  this year  :D
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Milltown Row2 on September 18, 2017, 08:33:34 PM
That was a serious game yesterday and the best games this year and past have had Mayo involved, but not enough games to warrant football is better than hurling
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: imtommygunn on September 18, 2017, 09:08:32 PM
Yesterday was the two best teams in football playing with nothing between them.

The semi final between galway and tipp was the two best teams in hurling playing with nothing between them.

The games between the top teams are always good. There used to be less top teams in hurling but now there is less in football so the real good games are harder to come by.   

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: didlyi on September 18, 2017, 09:25:21 PM
Well summed up. Yesterday was a great game but its seem we have to wait maybe 364 days for the next one. The 2018  hurling c'ship  will throw in as it ended this year with many games impossible to call. The 2014 hurling final and replay were fantastic games in what was otherwise a poor championship and as with the Dublin this year Kilkenny ran out winners then and the depression continued.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: screenexile on September 18, 2017, 09:38:30 PM
Not much talk on here today . . . I thought yesterdays game was far and away a better match than the Hurling Final!
One good game a year.. ..
Hurling Championship was far better over all.
Even the Camogie final was better than most of the football  this year  :D

Nonsense there were plenty of good games in the Championship just because they weren't games between the top teams and the audiences weren't big doesn't mean it didn't happen!

This was probably as good a Champoonshil as there has been in a long time.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: imtommygunn on September 18, 2017, 10:18:10 PM
What were they? I can think of about one mayo weren't involved in.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Knock Yer Mucker In on September 18, 2017, 10:44:32 PM
Not much talk on here today . . . I thought yesterdays game was far and away a better match than the Hurling Final!
One good game a year.. ..
Hurling Championship was far better over all.
Even the Camogie final was better than most of the football  this year  :D

Tosh, Mayo V Derry, Mayo V Kerry drawn game, Roscommon V Mayo drawn game were all very enjoyable games with yesterday's game the icing on the cake. Mayo being the common denominator
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on September 18, 2017, 11:23:39 PM
Down-Monaghan, Kildare-Armagh..
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: ashman on September 19, 2017, 01:32:06 AM
Yesterday was a great game but the result left a coldness .

The bottom line is that hurling was a better championship and for all hurling's imbalance and lack of spread the needs of the governing body to fill Croke park has never influenced who wins the hurling championship .
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Syferus on September 19, 2017, 02:09:44 AM
Yesterday was a great game but the result left a coldness .

The bottom line is that hurling was a better championship and for all hurling's imbalance and lack of spread the needs of the governing body to fill Croke park has never influenced who wins the hurling championship .

What would happen if Dublin hurling grows into a cash cow like the footballers? There's absolutely nothing intrinsically different to stop it, it's only not happening because by dumb luck football is king in the capital region.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on September 19, 2017, 08:42:21 AM
Yesterday was a great game but the result left a coldness .
True. All a bit like Scottish soccer thingy with one monster team devouring all the little ones.
Imagine the craic had the Rhubarbs won!!!!!
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: mouview on September 20, 2017, 01:33:17 PM
Not much talk on here today . . . I thought yesterdays game was far and away a better match than the Hurling Final!

Wouldn't necessarily agree. Wasn't at the football final, so can't comment on the atmosphere or tension at it. Hurling final was very tense, but wasn't a bad game for all of that. It was also played in a very good sporting manner. The football final was dramatic and nailbiting but I don't think it's quality was anything out of the ordinary and, like most latter-stages championship matches now, there was an undercurrent of niggle and spite running through it.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on September 20, 2017, 03:42:00 PM
Yesterday was a great game but the result left a coldness .

The bottom line is that hurling was a better championship and for all hurling's imbalance and lack of spread the needs of the governing body to fill Croke park has never influenced who wins the hurling championship .

What would happen if Dublin hurling grows into a cash cow like the footballers? There's absolutely nothing intrinsically different to stop it, it's only not happening because by dumb luck football is king in the capital region.
Hurling is cultural so needs deeper roots.
You can't really buy it in.
Football is Dublin's GAA thing. Hurling isn't.  Doesnt have the scale.

Roscommon would be a great hurling county. 60k .100% hurling. Would win all Irelands every 20 years . Football is strategically the wrong option for Ros 
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on September 20, 2017, 04:07:19 PM
Seaf, hurley is mainly played in Norman Counties.
We weren't occupied till 1605 so never got immersed in the oul iomáint.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on September 20, 2017, 04:18:01 PM
Seaf, hurley is mainly played in Norman Counties.
We weren't occupied till 1605 so never got immersed in the oul iomáint.
Grand. But it would be strategically advantageous all the same.

Are you sure about 1605? Ballina is further west and it was trashed in the 1580's or so
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: manfromdelmonte on September 20, 2017, 04:43:11 PM
Seaf, hurley is mainly played in Norman Counties.
We weren't occupied till 1605 so never got immersed in the oul iomáint.
that's not true
the county was originally part of "The King's Cantreds" under King John (mainly Roscommon, but with some of east Galway - like the current constituency actually)

Normans were in Roscommon in 1227 building St John's Castle in Rinndown
1269 building Roscommon Castle,
1311, building Ballintubber Castle

the county boundaries were formally established in 1585 under the Tudors
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on September 20, 2017, 05:43:36 PM
The O'Connor captured it soon after and held it to the mid 16th Century.
Rushing in building the odd castle and getting feecked out again for 500 years.
There's a biteen of hurley stuff in mid and South Ros as a result of those temporary incursions but most of us held our own till 1605 or so.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: seafoid on September 20, 2017, 06:10:08 PM
The O'Connor captured it soon after and held it to the mid 16th Century.
Rushing in building the odd castle and getting feecked out again for 500 years.
There's a biteen of hurley stuff in mid and South Ros as a result of those temporary incursions but most of us held our own till 1605 or so.
The Normans lost steam after the Black Death. ThE O Connors got stronger. I don't think East Galway was Norman by 1500 either 
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: manfromdelmonte on September 20, 2017, 06:18:03 PM
The O'Connor captured it soon after and held it to the mid 16th Century.
Rushing in building the odd castle and getting feecked out again for 500 years.
There's a biteen of hurley stuff in mid and South Ros as a result of those temporary incursions but most of us held our own till 1605 or so.
when did hurling appear in Four Roads?
only when a school teacher from Kilkenny started in the local school

Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: mrhardyannual on September 20, 2017, 07:09:55 PM
Seaf, hurley is mainly played in Norman Counties.
We weren't occupied till 1605 so never got immersed in the oul iomáint.
What a load of bullsh*t. "Hurling is mostly played in Norman counties". Are you suggesting that hurling was spread by the Normans. If so you need a sharp course in Irish history. While hurling was adopted by the Normans as they became "more Irish than the Irish themselves" the game was played in so called Norman counties long before they came. The Statutes of Kilkenny in the early 14th century were designed to stop this adoption of the game and keep the young Normans engaged in archery etc. Local laws in Galway sought to prohibit the game as well.The popularity of the game in certain areas has more to do with geography than history. It was more difficult to play hurling in the bogs of Mayo or the hills of west Connemara than in East Galway or  Tipperary. The Christian brothers did much to popularise the game (not getting into an argument about what else they did) and Prunty pitches have helped defeat geography in recent years.
The game is catching on in Dublin. Most of the early work was done by Cumann na mBunscoil over the past 40 years but the growth of Gaelscoileanna at second level and their adoption of the game has seen it flourish. I expect to see a Dublin team will the All Ireland title in the next decade or so.
Title: Re: Hurling puts football in the shade
Post by: Rossfan on September 20, 2017, 09:09:07 PM
Major humour by pass it seems