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Messages - Jim_Murphy_74

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 58
1
General discussion / Re: 11th night bonfires
« on: July 11, 2018, 04:04:05 PM »
Any farmers having their own "bonfires" tonight?

Down our way we have on on the Eve of St. John's.  Fr one night only Council and Guards turned a blind eye to burning.  We did a clear out of the barn and burnt it all.   One lad was away that week and he was suggesting we start marking the Glorious Twelfth as well so that he could do the same.

Mind you ia bit of burning down a field is a far cry from the towering infernos in built up areas that you see up yer way.

/Jim.

2
General discussion / Re: 11th night bonfires
« on: July 11, 2018, 02:56:35 PM »
I see newspaper reports on bonfires being removed.   This won't please some people.

/Jim.

3
General discussion / Re: The Official World Cup 2018 Thread
« on: July 04, 2018, 01:55:51 PM »
Nolan is also obviously dipping his fishing rod in the water in the hope people will bite.

Undoubtedly.

Some of the responses below it from our ones are embarrassing. Imagine if someone said they were proud to be Irish after a republic win and our irishness was deemed illegitimate.

Of course and now he and his ilk are pointing that exact example out.

Stop falling for it and just ignore him.

Too late.

/Jim.

4
General discussion / Re: OnePlus Mobile phones
« on: June 22, 2018, 04:52:53 PM »
I got one plus 5T last year after always using Sony/Sony Ericsson.

Find it brilliant. Dash charge excellent.  I run mail , social media, Spotify for car, sat nav. I use it also for work so run an encrypted VM for work stuff. Others with Samsung phones have performance issues with that but I never do.

I travel with work so dual sim very handy to get a local sim when staying on extended trip abroad.

Would definitely recommend it.

/Jim.

5
General discussion / Re: Holidays
« on: June 07, 2018, 05:16:57 PM »
Fun fact, Seattle still has more cranes than New York and San Francisco combined

Apart from Frasier, Niles and Marty I wouldn't know too many of the Seattle cranes.

/Jim.

6
General discussion / Re: Catholics voting DUP
« on: June 06, 2018, 05:04:19 PM »
I think the DUP are playing a dangerous game.  You would think they want to keep tight with the Brits until Brexit is resolved at least.  They could have been more careful and way less emotive about how they are going to bat about abortion.  I would have thought a more strategic thing would be say that it's a matter for discussion by assembly, so let's redouble our efforts etc.. etc.. 

By roaring and shouting about it they are bringing more attention on the rest of their whacky shite:  (Sammy on ethnics, Peter on sending Muslims to the shops, gays repulsing Ian ”g,  Poots on creationsim).  Arlene getting involved in Scottish Orange Order march adds more fuel.

I mean WTF?  Is there no single strategist among them all? I know people caricature this crew but surely someone in the party is saying hold the horses, let's box a bit clever here and stop playing to the caricature? 

/Jim.

7
General discussion / Re: Eighth Amendment poll
« on: May 31, 2018, 02:31:57 PM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/religion-and-beliefs/catholics-who-voted-yes-should-consider-confession-says-bishop-1.3511127

Could you throw him a few quid to help with the pope's visit and go to one of the papal masses?  Would that earn an indulgence to offset your vote?

/Jim.

8
General discussion / Re: Eighth Amendment poll
« on: May 30, 2018, 09:13:55 AM »
Well I have to say I was disappointed by the result and shocked at the margin.

Much similar to Brexit and Trump I don't blame the people for voting the way they did. I think they were hoodwinked under a couple of pretenses. Namely, it being a woman's health issue, that the unborn are somehow not human.

For many of us that wrestled with this, those two issues are not mutually exclusive.

and that it is going to happen anyway....

This is true and it's something that has to be at least considered.  When something is happening so widespread, if it's brought into the system it can be at least regulated.


But the overriding factor I believe is actually to somehow cast of any perception that the international view of Ireland as a backwater languishing under the authority of bishops. and the countries that legalise abortion are somehow more socially advanced and progressive by allowing it.

Maybe it's because you are out of the country and it was reported as such internationally.  As someone who followed the debate closely I would argue this was an irish discussion, framed in an irish context.  In fact if anyone pointed elsewhere it was the no side, as they based a lot of arguments on the UK experience.  Specifically comparing the original intent versus actually results.


The Yes campaign were successful in hammering those messages home and they got thru. Couple that with portraying No voters as ignorant and stupid at every opportunity and you have the ingredients for a successful campaign. Seemingly this was aided by a few insensitive blunders from the lead figures of the No campaign and graphic posters which people found off putting.

The yes side certainly captured the human side of women in difficult situations and getting them to tell their story.  The difficulty the no side had with this was their tactic from the start was to dismiss this group of women as "less than 3%" and not engage them.   It came across time and time again as lacking empathy for their situation.  So much so that they seemed to change their tactics in the final few days to claim that they were a coalition of "full on pro-lifers" and "soft yes voters who felt legislation went too far".  To me it came across as a bit cynical and I wonder was it behind the (alleged) split in the camp in the final days.


The challenge is to take the position back and build it from the ground up where as a society everyone recognizes that they are extinguishing an unborn person's life and not just a bundle of cells, so that even tho there is a choice one is right and one is wrong and that the right choice will be made in the majority of cases.

Again I think you do the broader discourse in Ireland a disservice.  I think very few are fully in either camp.  In fact I think that Simon Harris won a lot of voters with his argument that life is not black and white.  It's a case that there are grey areas and having an absolutist statement in the constitution doesn't lend itself to that.    The No side tried to keep the absolute line and it didn't resonate with the electorate.  Again they couldn't keep a consistent message on this:

https://twitter.com/newsworthy_ie/status/999588348221063169

As for making sure the right choice in the majority of cases then I think this is where the "soft yes" side need to front up.  Now that as a country we give people this choice, we need to ensure it's not the only choice.   Culturally we need to make sure that the options other than abortion are portrayed in a positive light.   Education and contraception are needed for young people to avoid a slew of teenagers (of their own or parents volition) come looking for terminations.   People of disability and their families must have all the supports they need.   

/Jim.

9
General discussion / Re: Eighth Amendment poll
« on: May 28, 2018, 02:43:51 PM »
Ok folks -practical realities
How many new Gynaecologists and support staff will the Health Service need for the 3 months no reason abortions?
24 month waiting lists not a runner here.

Surely anything less than 3 months will be a trip to the GP for a pill?  Maybe one scan at most?  What will these new Gynies and and staff be doing?

/Jim.

I thought the abortion pill required medical supervision etc? They are unsafe if not administered and monitored by a specialist?

Most of the time, no.  I would expect that the only medical supervision would be a general checkup and a scan in the case of history of ectopic pregancies.  Most would be prescribed pill once the matter is discussed and that they still want to proceed after the 72hour cooling off period.  They would be told to go home and wait for things to happen and contact medics in the event  of something going wrong.  I don't envisage many women being admitted while they wait for events to take their course after the pills.

/Jim.

Is a DNC required?

I'm not a medic but I guess if a woman has heavy bleeding during her subsequent periods the yes, a DNC would be required then.  I don't think you say it is definitely needed.

I would be of a belief (maybe mistaken) that under new legislation a woman can go to GP, discuss taking the pill, have a checkup and get prescription.  If they are unlucky enough to have issue they will feel free to return to GP for follow up.  I am guessing today that women are either taking pills or getting a one-off appointment in UK.  So any follow up treatment is already part of our system.   

For most cases I would guess the only extra "load" is that like any prescription medicine there will be some checking done up front.

Open to correction by the intelligentsia here of course.

/Jim.

10
General discussion / Re: Eighth Amendment poll
« on: May 28, 2018, 02:03:38 PM »
Ok folks -practical realities
How many new Gynaecologists and support staff will the Health Service need for the 3 months no reason abortions?
24 month waiting lists not a runner here.

Surely anything less than 3 months will be a trip to the GP for a pill?  Maybe one scan at most?  What will these new Gynies and and staff be doing?

/Jim.

I thought the abortion pill required medical supervision etc? They are unsafe if not administered and monitored by a specialist?

Most of the time, no.  I would expect that the only medical supervision would be a general checkup and a scan in the case of history of ectopic pregancies.  Most would be prescribed pill once the matter is discussed and that they still want to proceed after the 72hour cooling off period.  They would be told to go home and wait for things to happen and contact medics in the event  of something going wrong.  I don't envisage many women being admitted while they wait for events to take their course after the pills.

/Jim.

11
General discussion / Re: Eighth Amendment poll
« on: May 28, 2018, 01:49:35 PM »
Ok folks -practical realities
How many new Gynaecologists and support staff will the Health Service need for the 3 months no reason abortions?
24 month waiting lists not a runner here.

Surely anything less than 3 months will be a trip to the GP for a pill?  Maybe one scan at most?  What will these new Gynies and and staff be doing?



So, what are they going to do for women?

The answer, without a shadow of a doubt, is absolutely nothing.

They won't be campaigning for free contraception, or comprehensive sex education, or better supports for single parents, or better supports for parents of disabled children, or better childcare.


Most of the supports are also off limit to your average right wing conservative type.  I think it will be up to the "soft yes" representation to push for this.   Those that see abortion as a necessary evil but an evil all the same.  Coveney for example is making the right noises.

In fact some of the things that you class as supports would likely be fought tooth and nail by likes of Iona etc.. such as freer access to contraception and comprehensive sex education.

/Jim.

12
General discussion / Re: Eighth Amendment poll
« on: May 25, 2018, 11:19:15 AM »
When Michael McDowell was Attorney General in 2002, he proposed an amendment to the 8th....
The subsection shall not invalidate laws enacted by the Oireachtas to permit and regulate the termination of a pregnancy which is alleged in a prescribed form to be the result of a crime committed against the mother

Accepting the difficulties of subsequent legislation for rape, it shows that addressing many scenarios via an amendment could have been quite straight forward.

And Sid, any thoughts on my last post ?

Maybe from a pure legal point of view but generally proving "a crime committed against the mother" takes the legal system longer than 9 months.  So useless in a practical sense.

/Jim.

13
General discussion / Re: Eighth Amendment poll
« on: May 24, 2018, 12:01:25 AM »
Mullen is a disgrace. Young girl in tears telling the story of the time she went to Birmingham for an abortion.

"You deserve love and respect, regardless of what you have done"

Possibly trumped by his comments on mental health.

/Jim.

14
General discussion / Re: Eighth Amendment poll
« on: May 23, 2018, 11:28:25 AM »
Removing the 8th means itís an entirely personal decision, as it always should have been. People can lobby for not aborting fetuses with serious conditions but realistically this referendum the main event when it comes to society peering into a womanís reproductive organs and having a say.

I understand where you are coming from. However, other countries are heading almost full circle.  Cultural and societal drivers (if not legislative ones) are meaning that they are on the verge of compelling women to abort.   This is again "peering into a womanís reproductive organs and having a say".

/Jim.

15
General discussion / Re: Eighth Amendment poll
« on: May 23, 2018, 10:28:09 AM »
Thanks Jim, good post. I had a conversation with the OH at the weekend about this and what we would do. It would be a tough call for anyone which probably leads towards your point 4 and Iceland v ireland

The figures and commentary from Rotunda and Holles Street suggest that we are heading in Icelandic direction for both 3 and 4.  The pace that technology for screening and testing is developing means that this will go way beyond DS.  With the right software and knowledge it's already possible to review an unborn's child DNA at home. 

The ethical choices coming down the line will leave this squabble about the 8th in the halfpenny place.

/Jim.

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