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Messages - Lar Naparka

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1
General discussion / Re: A United Ireland - The Nationalist Paradox
« on: April 09, 2021, 01:57:16 PM »

I  have said on occasion that I like the way EG goes about presenting his arguments. A master craftsman at work. If he were an architect, he could come up with the Taj Mahal- most of the time anyway.
But not on this occasion: this is more the Tower of Pisa than the oriental masterpiece.

For starters, I disagree with what I take to be his central premise.

 ‘For since the GFA, the Constitutional future of NI is solely in the hands of the people of NI and no-one else. Further, it is only a majority who will ever decide, whether to stay within the UK, or join a UI. All else is bluster and flannel.’
There is the matter of the Republic’s consent to be factored in.

I would say that a large majority in the south would back UI- but not at any cost.
If the referendum was to be held right now, the south would  quite probably vote no.
In 7 years time and if  Taigs and Prods could agree to work out their differences like  adults, the south might decide otherwise.
You have the Shinners reverting to type and giving the GFA the stiff finger salute over the burial of Bobby Storey, an avowed paramilitary. All that was missing was the  volley of shots over his coffin.
The Prods, predictably, got their collective knickers in a twist but many down here take a more dispassionate view of what happened. It is bad enough that the Shinners are still spoiling for a fight with the oul’ enemy but the fact that there was a decidedly muted reaction for the moderate nationalist sector hasn’t gone unnoticed either.
It’s okay talking about UI as if it was only a case of sickening ‘themmuns.’
I believe the reaction might very well be ‘ Must try harder. Come back in 7 years time.’
The fact that the DUP backed Brexit and now want to reject what Boris negotiated on their behalf hasn’t gone unnoticed either.
Throw the fact that the dissent on the loyalist side has escalated to the point where there are clashes along the peace lines and EG’s paradox won’t even get a trial run.


EG has a view to which he is entitled, and I respect. However I’m finding it impossible to respect your view in bold above . Genuine question , can you explain to me where you get your  “knowledge” of the North? and please try to avoid lazy stereotypes and insults.
It might help if I knew WTF you are on about!
I too respect EG’s point(s) of view. I am on record as saying that he is the best debater I know of and I see no reason to change my opinion of him because of his opening post of this thread.
However, it struck me forcibly that I can’t recall a single norther poster, the great man included  who even considered that the people of the south might like to have a say in shaping the joint future of all on the island.
Why you think I will resort to stereotypes and insults is beyond me. It seems that my use of the pejorative terms, ‘Taig’ and ‘Prod’ upsets your sensibilities and I don’t understand why. Those terms are in common use, in the north at any rate and I’m sure a lot worse terms are being hurled about right now.
the Constitutional future of NI is solely in the hands of the people of NI and no-one else.
I picked on this in EG’s post and you seem to take exception to what I had to say about it.
Why?
I find it extremely offensive that on both sides of the sectarian divide, the feelings of the voters in the south are dismissed out of hand. This uis a topic EG has discussed/debated several (many?) times in the past and he apparently also sees the future of a UI as being a matter for Nationalists and Unionists to sort out between them.
THe fact that 70% of the combined total on this island are southerners and that we will inevitably be forced to dig deep into our pockets doesn't seem worthy of notice either.
Now, if there is anything I have said so far that you feel is factually incorrect, you might care to let me know.
What do you mean when you infer that I know nothing about the north? Anything I have said here can be picked up from current news media reports.
What is there to be known apart from the fact that cross-community strife has broken out once again. No one needs a degree in applied engineering to know that the old hatreds are still alive and vibrant and that if there isn’t some serious effort made to heal or at least tone down sectarian differences, only a fool could expect the people of the south to willingly take all on board where they can continue fighting to their heart’s content.
In short, a little bit of tact could go a long way and a word or two of recognition for the fact that southerners would like to think they have some right to have their op[inions listened to good be a goood idea also.

Apologies I quoted this bit in bold in error: “ the Constitutional future of NI is solely in the hands of the people of NI and no-one else” , In quoting your original post .  It was actually only the bold bit relating to Prods , taigs that I was alluding to. Hard to get this quoting right🤦🏻‍♂️.
As a Mayo man I would have presumed you would try to understand the underdog a bit better.
The majority of the population of ireland as a whole backed the first Dáil. The result was that 26 counties managed to secure freedom from BritAin. Your freedom was basically attained through republicanism across the 32 counties but “republicans” in the 6 counties were cut loose from the 26 and left to fend for themselves. Some 100 years later you are trying to tell me that we should just continue to suck it up, coz I’m alright jack? And by the way “republicans” in the 6 should also behave “like adults “ and cowtow to unionists , including our first minister who is a solicitor that thinks bus burners aren’t the “real law breakers”. You should be ashamed of yourself as a Mayoman who I suspect is a follower of the self-proclaimed “Republican Party”.

On the subject of “taigs and prods” behaving “like adults” are you aware for example in that in the area I live in  ?~85% “nationalist/republican” there has been power sharing for nearly 50 years with the chair of the council rotating between n/r and unionist. We all work and are friends with people with unionist background . The problem here is that the leadership of the 6 counties remains in the hands of the supremacist DUP who are blocking progress. SF have a history that many find it hard to see beyond (understandably) but it hasn’t helped the situation here when at times SF seem to be the only ones calling out the DUP, and then others present it as a DUP/SF issue.
I have to say you had me pretty confused!
Furthermore, I don’t think you can follow what I am really trying to say. I have a much greater interest in northern affairs than the average southerner and I certainly do appreciate the difficulties you and moderate nationalists have to face on an ongoing basis.
But the average person down here is hardly aware of what goes on in the north any more that someone in Finchley or Solihull could be expected to have. I am very much aware that WT Cosgrave sold you out at the 1926 Boundary Commision negotiations and accepted Stanley Baldwin’s offer to write off a few outstanding debts. Craig, Baldwin and Cosgrave shook hands and decided to shelve the report and that was that.
But the average citizen of the republic couldn’t tell the difference between Stanley Baldwin and Stanley Matthews- or give a damn either way.
To understand my personal view, you’d need to keep what I told you about the Pioneers’ excursion to Bundran many years ago.
A few lads decided to slip off to the nearest pub for a few jars, a row broke out which wasn’t terribly serious and the poor Pioneers got blamed for calling out the riot police!
The fact that ,say, 90% of those who went to the seaside were completely blameless wasn’t even considered -they were all tarred with the same brush!
For me, there is a parallel between what happened in Bundoran and what is happening in Northern Ireland now. I can understand your plight but most down here certainly do not.
Sinn Fein get all the column inches down here and the voice of moderate nationalism is not heard.
I am not sure you can understand this but most here have never heard of Colum Eastwood, let alone name the party he leads. The same can be said for every politician you have with the exception of the usual extremists such as Michelle and Arlene.
Right now, the north is getting plenty of exposure but what’s coming through is the pitched battles between rival gangs across peace lines.
I am 100% certain that moderate nationalists like you and moderate Unionists like EG completely disassociate yourselves from what’s going on but that doesn’t come across on this side of the border- well, maybe it does to a small number butcertainly not to the majority.
For most, it’s just another instance of Taigs v Prods.
(Granted very many wouldn’t have heard the term Taig but they certainly understand its meaning.)
What about EG’s paradox?
While I’d bet that every northern poster on this topic knows the ins and outs of the GFA down to the last full stop, the same can’t be said for 95% plus this side of the border.
 
Thus,  ”For since the GFA, the Constitutional future of NI is solely in the hands of the people of NI and no-one else. Further, it is only a majority who will ever decide, whether to stay within the UK, or join a UI. All else is bluster and flannel.” is perfectly in line with the provisions of the GFA, it certainly won’t come across in the same light down here if the prospect of a positive vote is likely.
Right now, I’m certain that a majority down here would have grave reservations about the prospect of the riots in northern Ireland being transferred down here.
PS I can't recalll that I said Taigs and Prods should behave like adults but that would be my porobable meaning.

2
General discussion / Re: A United Ireland - The Nationalist Paradox
« on: April 08, 2021, 10:47:29 PM »

I  have said on occasion that I like the way EG goes about presenting his arguments. A master craftsman at work. If he were an architect, he could come up with the Taj Mahal- most of the time anyway.
But not on this occasion: this is more the Tower of Pisa than the oriental masterpiece.

For starters, I disagree with what I take to be his central premise.

 ‘For since the GFA, the Constitutional future of NI is solely in the hands of the people of NI and no-one else. Further, it is only a majority who will ever decide, whether to stay within the UK, or join a UI. All else is bluster and flannel.’
There is the matter of the Republic’s consent to be factored in.

I would say that a large majority in the south would back UI- but not at any cost.
If the referendum was to be held right now, the south would  quite probably vote no.
In 7 years time and if  Taigs and Prods could agree to work out their differences like  adults, the south might decide otherwise.
You have the Shinners reverting to type and giving the GFA the stiff finger salute over the burial of Bobby Storey, an avowed paramilitary. All that was missing was the  volley of shots over his coffin.
The Prods, predictably, got their collective knickers in a twist but many down here take a more dispassionate view of what happened. It is bad enough that the Shinners are still spoiling for a fight with the oul’ enemy but the fact that there was a decidedly muted reaction for the moderate nationalist sector hasn’t gone unnoticed either.
It’s okay talking about UI as if it was only a case of sickening ‘themmuns.’
I believe the reaction might very well be ‘ Must try harder. Come back in 7 years time.’
The fact that the DUP backed Brexit and now want to reject what Boris negotiated on their behalf hasn’t gone unnoticed either.
Throw the fact that the dissent on the loyalist side has escalated to the point where there are clashes along the peace lines and EG’s paradox won’t even get a trial run.


EG has a view to which he is entitled, and I respect. However I’m finding it impossible to respect your view in bold above . Genuine question , can you explain to me where you get your  “knowledge” of the North? and please try to avoid lazy stereotypes and insults.
It might help if I knew WTF you are on about!
I too respect EG’s point(s) of view. I am on record as saying that he is the best debater I know of and I see no reason to change my opinion of him because of his opening post of this thread.
However, it struck me forcibly that I can’t recall a single norther poster, the great man included  who even considered that the people of the south might like to have a say in shaping the joint future of all on the island.
Why you think I will resort to stereotypes and insults is beyond me. It seems that my use of the pejorative terms, ‘Taig’ and ‘Prod’ upsets your sensibilities and I don’t understand why. Those terms are in common use, in the north at any rate and I’m sure a lot worse terms are being hurled about right now.
the Constitutional future of NI is solely in the hands of the people of NI and no-one else.
I picked on this in EG’s post and you seem to take exception to what I had to say about it.
Why?
I find it extremely offensive that on both sides of the sectarian divide, the feelings of the voters in the south are dismissed out of hand. This uis a topic EG has discussed/debated several (many?) times in the past and he apparently also sees the future of a UI as being a matter for Nationalists and Unionists to sort out between them.
THe fact that 70% of the combined total on this island are southerners and that we will inevitably be forced to dig deep into our pockets doesn't seem worthy of notice either.
Now, if there is anything I have said so far that you feel is factually incorrect, you might care to let me know.
What do you mean when you infer that I know nothing about the north? Anything I have said here can be picked up from current news media reports.
What is there to be known apart from the fact that cross-community strife has broken out once again. No one needs a degree in applied engineering to know that the old hatreds are still alive and vibrant and that if there isn’t some serious effort made to heal or at least tone down sectarian differences, only a fool could expect the people of the south to willingly take all on board where they can continue fighting to their heart’s content.
In short, a little bit of tact could go a long way and a word or two of recognition for the fact that southerners would like to think they have some right to have their op[inions listened to good be a goood idea also.

3
General discussion / Re: A United Ireland - The Nationalist Paradox
« on: April 08, 2021, 03:45:22 PM »

I  have said on occasion that I like the way EG goes about presenting his arguments. A master craftsman at work. If he were an architect, he could come up with the Taj Mahal- most of the time anyway.
But not on this occasion: this is more the Tower of Pisa than the oriental masterpiece.

For starters, I disagree with what I take to be his central premise.

 ‘For since the GFA, the Constitutional future of NI is solely in the hands of the people of NI and no-one else. Further, it is only a majority who will ever decide, whether to stay within the UK, or join a UI. All else is bluster and flannel.’
There is the matter of the Republic’s consent to be factored in.

I would say that a large majority in the south would back UI- but not at any cost.
If the referendum was to be held right now, the south would  quite probably vote no.
In 7 years time and if  Taigs and Prods could agree to work out their differences like  adults, the south might decide otherwise.
You have the Shinners reverting to type and giving the GFA the stiff finger salute over the burial of Bobby Storey, an avowed paramilitary. All that was missing was the  volley of shots over his coffin.
The Prods, predictably, got their collective knickers in a twist but many down here take a more dispassionate view of what happened. It is bad enough that the Shinners are still spoiling for a fight with the oul’ enemy but the fact that there was a decidedly muted reaction for the moderate nationalist sector hasn’t gone unnoticed either.
It’s okay talking about UI as if it was only a case of sickening ‘themmuns.’
I believe the reaction might very well be ‘ Must try harder. Come back in 7 years time.’
The fact that the DUP backed Brexit and now want to reject what Boris negotiated on their behalf hasn’t gone unnoticed either.
Throw the fact that the dissent on the loyalist side has escalated to the point where there are clashes along the peace lines and EG’s paradox won’t even get a trial run.
'But if Nationalism is to get over the line, it has to muster the bulk of the "Others" (Alliance, Greens, Independents etc) to their cause. Yet if you look at their votes, they are overwhelmingly drawn from Unionist-leaning areas (East Belfast, North Down etc). Therefore in the event of a Referendum, one might expect those of them who did bother to vote, to be Unionist.'
 
One indeed might expect this but it is not a given.
Alot could depend on what type of a united Ireland would be on offer. After all, Boris and the Brits in general aren’t arsed by all the flag waving and declarations of fealty to the Crown.
There is nowt to  suppose that level-headed Unionists would always reject out of hand whatever is on offer.
The tide is going out for ‘A Protestant parliament for a Protestant people.’
It could be argued with as much validity that many Nationalist in the middle ground would probably vote yes if they were happy with what was on offer because the probability is that the Brits will offload them at the earliest possible opportunity. Like moderate Unionists,  they could opt to make the break since the odds are that sooner or later, the likelihood is that there will be a UI of some sort,
For the case EG posits, a lot of ducks would have to waddle in a straight line and they won’t keep doing so indefinitely.

4
GAA Discussion / Re: Should Dublin be banned from championship?
« on: April 02, 2021, 03:17:21 PM »
GAA needs to lay down a marker. Should the dubs be banned from 2021 championship? Reports of 32 at training session.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.balls.ie/amp/gaa/dublin-gaa-players-photographed-at-dawn-training-session-465229

Ban them, then split them in 4.

Good point.

Split them in 4 then ban the 4 teams
Spot on Itchy!
Give 'em a fair trial and then shoot the whole effin' lot of them. ;D

5
GAA Discussion / Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« on: April 02, 2021, 02:27:07 PM »
Lar I took a dander over to our club yesterday evening to do some weed killing.

There was a group of a dozen 10-11 year olds playing soccer in one of the goalmouths. Some members of the club, some not.

On the adjacent council field there was two dozen 14-15 year olds enjoying a heated game of soccer. Again a mix of club members and not.

Was either group inspired to play football because they saw photos of Dublin players doing it? No. Was either group inspired to take a liberty with the law because they saw photos of Dublin doing it? No.

Were they out playing football because it was a great evening and all the pitches were cut this week? Yes.

Exactly the same thing my fiends and I did 30 years ago.

——

People put too much stock in role models.

There’s a reason why the vast majority of teenage girls aren’t pregnant, married, divorced, recovered alcoholic runaways, even though almost every teenage soap character follows a journey along those lines. It’s because human beings have an inbuilt risk radar which keeps them out of trouble most of the time. We are influenced by celebrity but we are smart enough to make our own decisions about what matters. Even the stupidest of us.
Remember Dana, the Derry girl that won the Eurovision many years ago?
Sometime after she fronted a campaign to persuade young people. Such role model stuff would be pretty commonplace now but back in the 70s, Dana's message stood out because she was  famous and she was young, fresh and innocent- as every mother would wish her offspring to be.
I was teaching 11-12 year olds at the time and all of them looked up to the wee lass from Derry.
I arrived one morning  and got out of my car and straightaway I could sense that all was not well in the playground. Kids were gathered in animated knots and you could feel the buzz that only revved up children can generate.
As soon as I left the car, I had a horde of excited kids milling about. With maybe ten of the boys attempting to speak at once and as many more on the periphery trying to push their way to the front, the decibel count was way off the Richter scale!
I finally got them under some sort of semi-control and when the yelps and squeals have subsided somewhat, I was finally able to decipher what the cause of the commotion was.
Dana had been seen smoking! 
Somebody has seen her puffing a fag between takes on a TV show being filmed at Montrose and the word spread like wildfire. Dana was a fake!
To be fair to the young lady, it was never proved beyond any reasonable shadow of doubt that she had transgressed but the rumour was enough to cause a stir throughout the land. No one ever came forward to claim that he/she had actually seen her with a fag in her gob; it may have been a complete fabrication or a trick of the light - who knows?
Back then, there weren't nearly as many diversions to occupy people's' attention and this was BIG News!
Dana did the cigarette manufacturers no harm at all as far as I and my colleagues could tell,  and. like teachers and parents throughout the land, a lot of explaining had to be done.
Take my word for it, people pay more respect to role models than you seem to appreciate.


6
GAA Discussion / Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« on: April 02, 2021, 12:33:06 PM »
Some of my observations the past month.

A couple of weeks back I stood outside Tesco waiting to get in. There were about 30 ahead of me in the queue, and it took about 2-3 mins to get in. So in back of an envelope figures, they’re processing 600-700 people an hour through an indoor space. But more interesting was that the queue and indeed the store was full to the brim of families, with children all unmasked, out for a leisurely stroll around their supermarket.

I called into the M1 Lisburn services for fuel. Went in to pay, and found that the entire indoor complex was open for business. Almost every seat was taken upstairs and down. And not by truckers on a necessary stopover for tiredness.

Just Sunday past my mother and ageing aunt went off to mass. To sit indoors with a bunch of other septuagenarians.

And once again, a few weeks ago, we were told to send our kids back to school. To sit indoors for 6 hours a day with dozens of people.

——

All of these things are immeasurably more dangerous than training outdoors.

But because a group of civil servants somewhere have both knowingly and unknowingly created a set of laws that are inconsistent and full of gaping holes, they also are all permitted activities.

——

Healthy adult males training outdoors in a small group is as much a Covid threat as the shape of tonight’s moon.

——

The world would be a better place if people applied common sense before outrage.

We all now know the basic science of staying safe. Meeting people outdoors is safe. Sanitise before and after to be double safe. Minimise any form of contact. Do not travel together or you undo all of the above.

With regards to the Dublin footballers, this means either the science is wrong or the laws are wrong.

Engage your brain before your mouth.

Quite possibly both are wrong but the point at issue is that the Dublin individuals concerned gave the stiff two finger sign to both. They are widely regarded as role models by the public in general and especially young people, in particular by Dublin kids.
The players take this responsibility quite seriously as evidenced by the visits to children's' hospitals after All Ireland finals and too many other instances to mention.
Now, on the morning following clear directived from the GAA to the contrary, Farrell and a number of his players flouted brazenly the rules.
This is what sid waddell had to say in a recent post and sid is an excellent wordsmith - at times.
"This is not about the risk of the Dublin team spreading Covid as a result of the meeting up yesterday morning, which is minute
It's about the entirety of the rules that every person on this island is asked to adhere to, the millions upon millions of individual and institutional decisions to either adhere to the rules or give two fingers to them."

I don't think I could express the crux of the matter any better so I won't even try.
No doubt about it, people are flouting the restrictions left, right and centre and will continue to do so because all of us are confused, bothered and bewildered by the complexity of guidelines being replaced or amended all the time- or so it can seem.
However, the restrictions have been devised by the best qualified medical personnel at our disposal and their liaison with the best international experts should add weight to their decisions.
The sight of their role models totally ignoring government regulations and qualified medical advice won't motivate many kids, or adults either to follow social distancing and all that goes with it. 

 


7
GAA Discussion / Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« on: April 01, 2021, 10:02:16 PM »
This is not a group of lads having an impromptu game of ball on a green

This is six in a row All-Ireland champions Dublin, the institution of the Dublin football team and Dublin GAA, training away at their usual training venue at the usual time, driving there in their branded Dublin GAA cars, as if there's no pandemic and no rules

It's a two fingers to Covid bereaved like myself, and especially Covid bereaved Dublin supporters like myself, my father was a Dublin supporter for well over 60 years, he could recite to you in minute detail about the 1955 championship, about the time Wexford beat Dublin in Carlow in '56, and every year since then

Is it any wonder other people are breaking the rules more and more when this is the example of prominent people in the public eye - and this team has set itself up as role models

And still people deflect about what this is about

This is not about the risk of the Dublin team spreading Covid as a result of the meeting up yesterday morning, which is minute

It's about the entirety of the rules that every person on this island is asked to adhere to, the millions upon millions of individual and institutional decisions to either adhere to the rules or give two fingers to them

The Dublin team as an institution, through their actions, are giving the two fingers to the efforts of everybody to control and get rid of this pandemic - and it doesn't stop at the Dublin team, it reflects terribly on the whole GAA because far more in the GAA are at it and far more have been at it

That's what its about

+1
Extremely well put sid. You can turn eloquence into an art form- most of the time anyway. ;D

8
GAA Discussion / Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« on: April 01, 2021, 05:44:25 PM »
This story about Dublin caught out training is a storm in a tea cup. Outdoor activities is as low risk as you can get. The month of March should have been used for inter County training with the leagues played in April.

That would have given us May, June, July and August to play club or Inter County championships.
You can't be serious! Why bother with Covid restrictions at all if individuals or organisations can set their own rules on the hoof? Don't you think the month of March would have been put to better use if it was deemed in the public interest to do so?

9
GAA Discussion / Re: Joe Brolly
« on: April 01, 2021, 05:12:52 PM »
You believe what you want Trueblue  or what suits your closed mind.
I just recounted what actually happened.
Over and out.

From most other posters I’d have taken it as face value. From you, with your history of anti-northern posts and cheap post scoring, I’d take it with a strong pinch of salt.

Lar, I have no doubt there were people who thought that way. There’s always lazy people who will jump to a viewpoint that suits their narrative. You have it on here, where you have posters (from both sides I should add) that were attempting to use posts from some anonymous posters who’s on the wind up as the reason they’d vote against a UI. When in reality these people are just embarrassed to admit that the real reason is because they think “I’m alright Jack”.
I would never claim that Ross is easy to follow or that he doesn’t wiggle in and out of the twilight zone at times, but, in this instance anyway, you may have picked him up wrong. You probably  didn’t read what had been under discussion when you hit on his post that you objected to.
He may put up insulting posts about northerners but then  I don't read everything he posts.
Sam had mentioned that southerners, by and large, seem to have an antagonistic view of northern nationalists and Ross chipped in to say that derogatory terms like ‘Free Staters’ is one reason.
That’s where what I said about Bundoran comes in….
If a very small minority keep on jibing us, most will get irritated and will be inclined to regard all nationalists as provocative and insulting for no other obvious reason.
btw, I don't imagine anyone in the south would feel deeply insulted by what the likes of Angeo comes out with. it's more irritation than anything else. Like a housefly buzzing about the room.
I was following the thread. I’ll be honest, that reads a bit like your pushing the blame onto those pesky northerners again for why some Southern people have a antagonistic approach to people from the North. I’ve no doubt there will be a small minority that may use the term freestater” (I’ve never heard it used in 40 odd years) but it’s also true that that theres people in the south that see themselves as more Irish than people in the North and just have that bred into them. And as such are antagonistic without cause or provocation.
Maybe that’s not how you meant it to come across, but if you read the last few pages there’s a definite theme of trying to equate the blame to the nordies for how people in the South act.
I think many northerners fail to realise that people south of the border have nowhere the same focus on politics or indeed any other issue that means so much to you.
For most, there's just a failure to comprehend the effect of living as second class citizens in Ireland - anywhere on the island.
So Arlene and the DUP nitpicking over the provisions of the Irish language legislation comes across as petty political but so does the typical SF response. I’d say that at least 95% of folks down here can’t comprehend how much official recognition of the language means to most northerners.
That’s just one of a series of examples I can think of. People down here have no idea of what life must have been like during the times of sectarian conflict. It ain’t really that they are indifferent or hostile -it’s that they don’t comprehend.

10
GAA Discussion / Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« on: April 01, 2021, 04:14:16 PM »
I would also like to point out, the point i have made here numerous times is proved to be true, Dubs train in Innisfails, a slanty pitch with below standard changing rooms and facilities etc, Not the Taj Mahal centre of excellences which other counties have use of, which is of extreme detriment to Dublin compared to the advantages that other counties have over them.
Ah, c'mon, will ya get up the yard, will ya? ;D ;D
What's the slanty pitch or the likes got to do with it?
And what does the Taj Mahals that other counties have mean either?

11
GAA Discussion / Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« on: April 01, 2021, 04:04:25 PM »
The very worst case scenario re insurance would be if one of the 9 got injured they wouldn't be covered. Absolutely no impact on Innisfails insurance cover generally.

Ignoring Covid for a sec (and I'm sure someone from Innisfails knew about it), but do you need formal permission to train on a GAA pitch? In the past I often organised early morning or late summer evening sessions when I knew there'd be plenty of room at my local GAA club,  with a 5 or 6 kids (son, nephew, friends) and a bag of balls - usually just fun stuff like scoring practice. Never once sought permission.
I’ve no intention of getting involved in this row but there’s a big difference letting a few kids have a kickabout and the county board and Innisfails deliberately flouting an official GAA directive.
Other clubs and counties may be doing the same thing but that’s irrelevant .

12
GAA Discussion / Re: Joe Brolly
« on: April 01, 2021, 03:48:32 PM »
You believe what you want Trueblue  or what suits your closed mind.
I just recounted what actually happened.
Over and out.

From most other posters I’d have taken it as face value. From you, with your history of anti-northern posts and cheap post scoring, I’d take it with a strong pinch of salt.

Lar, I have no doubt there were people who thought that way. There’s always lazy people who will jump to a viewpoint that suits their narrative. You have it on here, where you have posters (from both sides I should add) that were attempting to use posts from some anonymous posters who’s on the wind up as the reason they’d vote against a UI. When in reality these people are just embarrassed to admit that the real reason is because they think “I’m alright Jack”.
I would never claim that Ross is easy to follow or that he doesn’t wiggle in and out of the twilight zone at times, but, in this instance anyway, you may have picked him up wrong. You probably  didn’t read what had been under discussion when you hit on his post that you objected to.
He may put up insulting posts about northerners but then  I don't read everything he posts.
Sam had mentioned that southerners, by and large, seem to have an antagonistic view of northern nationalists and Ross chipped in to say that derogatory terms like ‘Free Staters’ is one reason.
That’s where what I said about Bundoran comes in….
If a very small minority keep on jibing us, most will get irritated and will be inclined to regard all nationalists as provocative and insulting for no other obvious reason.
btw, I don't imagine anyone in the south would feel deeply insulted by what the likes of Angeo comes out with. it's more irritation than anything else. Like a housefly buzzing about the room.

13
GAA Discussion / Re: Joe Brolly
« on: April 01, 2021, 12:02:17 PM »
True blue....the 2 events I described most certainly DID happen.
Just because I can't write as eloquently as (iar mhúinteóir?) Larnaparka.....
Strandhill was our seaside mecca but a visiting aunt or uncle might spoil us altogether by taking us to exotic Rosses Point.
Bundoran was out of bounds as "too many oul rough Northerners" went there.
I'm surprised that anyone would think that your 'scéals' are contrived. I certainly met plenty like our neighbour who were absolutely fed up with the endless negative publicity coming from the north and couldn't, or wouldn't, make an effort to distinguish between Nationalists or Unionists. Damn the whole goddamn loot of them-endless troublemakers...never satisfied with anything etc.
I've been in Edgbaston  in Brum and Cheetham Hill in Manchester so I knoow about the drunken rows that went on in those Irish Centres.
Nothing out of the ordinry with what you mentioned seeing in an Irish centre.

14
GAA Discussion / Re: Joe Brolly
« on: April 01, 2021, 08:31:13 AM »
This little anecdote may seem to be rambling off-topic but it might serve to emphasise a point I, and others, have been making. The antics of a few can get a whole load of totally innocent people a bad name.
Years ago, the Swinford Pioneers Association organised an excursion to the beach in Bundoran.  This was at the height of summer so there was no spare seats on either of the two buses. A good number of those travelling were honest pioneers with their lapel pins and I’d say just about all were genuine non-drinkers.
You couldn’t get a more respectable group of people anywhere. However, a few hard chaws decided to buy tickets and claimed they had no interest in the demon drink. The organisers thought no more of it; they sold all available seats and everyone was in good spirits all the way to Bundoran beach.
It was a very hot day and the usual suspects son grew tired of sitting around eating limp sandwiches and drinking lukewarm coca-cola.
So a few slipped off to the nearest pub and started to lorry into the black stuff.The inevitable happened and soon they were mixing it with a gang from somewhere else who were on the beer too.
A few thumps were exchanged and a few drinks were knocked over and in the end the guards arrived to sort things out.
Of course, the story didn’t end there.
Word got back to Mayo that a full-scale brawl had taken place and it took a dozen guards to restore the peace.
The poor Pioneers were blamed for the trouble and bringing shame on the good name of the county. Hard to believe but the Pioneer numbers in the town dropped off and there was never another coach outing in the years that followed.
It’s human nature to tar the many with the actions of a minority- much the same as we are discussing here.
I don’t imagine the name-callers will derail the peace process  but they have the capacity to gain their fellow nationalists a bad name.
Good story. You should give Rossfan some tips, his stories seem rather pointless and fabricated.

I'm still trying to get my head round why you would swap a lovely little spot like Swinford to spend the day in Bundoran of all places. Are there no decent beaches in Mayo?  :P
The novelty of going to somewhere none of them knew anything about was the attraction. Four hours of a sing song was okay for the older people but it meant a good session of fondling and groping for the young fellas and young wans with no mother or father about.
Besides,, Bundorn was the in place to be in those days- people from all over the country went there. It was tacky even then but there were no  shooting ranges or dodgem cars in any resort in Mayo.

15
GAA Discussion / Re: Joe Brolly
« on: March 31, 2021, 07:06:36 PM »
This little anecdote may seem to be rambling off-topic but it might serve to emphasise a point I, and others, have been making. The antics of a few can get a whole load of totally innocent people a bad name.
Years ago, the Swinford Pioneers Association organised an excursion to the beach in Bundoran.  This was at the height of summer so there was no spare seats on either of the two buses. A good number of those travelling were honest pioneers with their lapel pins and I’d say just about all were genuine non-drinkers.
You couldn’t get a more respectable group of people anywhere. However, a few hard chaws decided to buy tickets and claimed they had no interest in the demon drink. The organisers thought no more of it; they sold all available seats and everyone was in good spirits all the way to Bundoran beach.
It was a very hot day and the usual suspects son grew tired of sitting around eating limp sandwiches and drinking lukewarm coca-cola.
So a few slipped off to the nearest pub and started to lorry into the black stuff.The inevitable happened and soon they were mixing it with a gang from somewhere else who were on the beer too.
A few thumps were exchanged and a few drinks were knocked over and in the end the guards arrived to sort things out.
Of course, the story didn’t end there.
Word got back to Mayo that a full-scale brawl had taken place and it took a dozen guards to restore the peace.
The poor Pioneers were blamed for the trouble and bringing shame on the good name of the county. Hard to believe but the Pioneer numbers in the town dropped off and there was never another coach outing in the years that followed.
It’s human nature to tar the many with the actions of a minority- much the same as we are discussing here.
I don’t imagine the name-callers will derail the peace process  but they have the capacity to gain their fellow nationalists a bad name.

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