Author Topic: Irish Times - Insight into working for Ryanair  (Read 2899 times)

Sandino

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Re: Irish Times - Insight into working for Ryanair
« Reply #30 on: September 29, 2017, 03:58:00 PM »
Supply and demand but it will cost us the punters.
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tyssam5

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Re: Irish Times - Insight into working for Ryanair
« Reply #31 on: September 29, 2017, 10:14:14 PM »
Not much consolation if O'Leary pulls the plug on your flight.

Ach sure it's only 2% of all passengers. You still have a fair chance of getting there & back.

I would take a 2% risk if I was saving E100

seafoid

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Re: Irish Times - Insight into working for Ryanair
« Reply #32 on: September 30, 2017, 04:30:04 PM »


   https://www.ft.com/content/86d3955c-a4fd-11e7-9e4f-7f5e6a7c98a2

   Ryanair still flies a flag of contempt for customers
                  
      
                     Regulators cannot allow the chief executive to defy the law with impunity
                     And the airline is under pressure from Euro pean authorities who think the favourable tax treatment it receives in Ireland, and its use of Irish employment law, allows it to undercut rivals unfairly.
                                    
                                       " I don‘t think I‘ll use it                     Our booking system is full of people who swore they would never fly with us again,” an unrepentant Michael O’Leary boasted last week, just a moment after offering his “unreserved apology” for the mess over pilot rosters that led Ryanair to cancel flights affecting more than 700,000 passengers. The Irish airline’s abrasive chief executive has a point. He has always acted on the principle that passengers will put up with anything so long as the flight lands safely and the price is low enough. He has repeatedly been proved right. Ryanair thrived despite its reputation for chaotic queues, invasive advertising, aggressive baggage checks and infuriating add-on charges. It pioneered many of the tactics by which low-cost airlines have upended their industry and proved that short-haul carriers can make money. But even Ryanair found there was a point at which poor customer service impinges on growth. In 2013, Mr O’Leary declared his intent to “eliminate things that unnecessarily piss people off”. The aim was to pitch for more lucrative business passengers, who demand a modicum of comfort and set store by punctuality — and it paid off. Yet Mr O’Leary’s instinctive contempt for customers and employees appears to be intact — and ingrained in Ryanair’s corporate culture. This ought to be a concern for both regulators and shareholders. It is still not clear why a relatively minor change in regulation — counting pilots’ flying hours over a calendar rather than a fiscal year — should have caused so much disruption. Ryanair rejects suggestions that it does not have enough pilots and is struggling to retain them. But Mr O’Leary workforce relations are clearly delicate. It is also apparent that there is no slack at all in the system. Zero frills is one thing; but a bare bones approach to operational matters is more worrying.The mistakes that caused the cancellations are minor, though, next to the airline’s flagrant attempt to ignore its legal obligations to passengers. Mr O’Leary said openly at first that Ryanair would not pay to book people on to flights with other airlines where necessary, nor would it reimburse expenses incurred as a result of the cancellations. This was inexcusable. As the head of the Civil Aviation Authority put it: “People shouldn’t have to choose between low fares and legal rights.”Ryanair has now recanted, saying on Friday it had met regulators and agreed steps to fulfil its obligations and ensure passengers were aware of their rights. This will probably be enough to avert the CAA’s threat of legal action. Mr O’Leary insists there will be no lasting repercussions, and no impact on this year’s profits. Investors seem to agree: the share price has dipped, but is still 30 per cent higher than a year ago. It is true that Ryanair can easily absorb the immediate cost of compensating passengers. The airline may need to hire more crew as well as raising pilot pay but, even after this, its operating costs will be much lower than those of its nearest rivals. A recent ruling by the European Court of Justice, which will allow cabin crew to pursue claims in the countries where they are based, and not only in Irish courts, is a bigger threat to its business model. Nonetheless, Mr O’Leary should not assume the affair will blow over. Passengers have short memories but business travellers pay for reliability. Conciliation is not Mr O’Leary’s style, but it might be worth his while to try it for a change.
"you can try and intimidate us, but f**k youse, we're going to win an All-Ireland anyway"

JoG2

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Re: Irish Times - Insight into working for Ryanair
« Reply #33 on: September 30, 2017, 04:43:15 PM »
Has anyone noticed the way that all the other ethical low cost  airlines are jacking their prices up now that Ryanair is not as competitive?

Got an email from Ryanair to say a rtn flight in Nov was cancelled (full refund and an £80 Travel Voucher to be fair) Tried the other carriers fairly sharpish and the prices weren't very 'budget',  the hoors!

seafoid

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"you can try and intimidate us, but f**k youse, we're going to win an All-Ireland anyway"