Author Topic: Irish language  (Read 965 times)

tonto1888

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Irish language
« on: September 03, 2017, 01:14:54 PM »
Does anyone here speak it fluently or partly? I'm starting lessons on lurgan in a couple of weeks and would appreciate any tips

andoireabu

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Re: Irish language
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2017, 01:56:33 PM »
Download Duolingo. I find it useful for the basics and to help with spelling. Don't worry about making mistakes in what you say and enjoy it. Use the bits you have where you can. Teanglann.ie is a good resource. Ádh mór!
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5 Sams

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Re: Irish language
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2017, 06:52:10 PM »
Does anyone here speak it fluently or partly? I'm starting lessons on lurgan in a couple of weeks and would appreciate any tips

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seafoid

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Re: Irish language
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2017, 08:35:25 PM »
Does anyone here speak it fluently or partly? I'm starting lessons on lurgan in a couple of weeks and would appreciate any tips
I do.
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omochain

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Re: Irish language
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2017, 01:05:11 AM »
Download Duolingo. I find it useful for the basics and to help with spelling. Don't worry about making mistakes in what you say and enjoy it. Use the bits you have where you can. Teanglann.ie is a good resource. Ádh mór!

I have been at it mostly solo with duolingo for about 4 years. The only thing I have figured out so far is that I have no gift for language. I think I would be doing a lot better if I could find a conversation group that would match me pint for pint. Ádh mór ort.

T Fearon

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Re: Irish language
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2017, 01:02:00 PM »
Tonto are you commencing lessons "on" or "in" Lurgan?

Applesisapples

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Re: Irish language
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2017, 02:05:17 PM »
Tonto are you commencing lessons "on" or "in" Lurgan?
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hardstation

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Re: Irish language
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2017, 04:48:39 PM »
Tonto are you commencing lessons "on" or "in" Lurgan?
Very good point, Tony.
The Irish for "in Lurgan" is "ar An Lorgain". Although "i Lorgain" is probably accepted these days.

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Eamonnca1

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Re: Irish language
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2017, 06:22:56 PM »
Fair play to you. Who's running the lessons? Gaelic League in North Street? The Sarsfields club ran lessons back in my day, it gave me a one-year head start on the others in secondary school.

The younger you are when you start learning the better. If you start learning a language before the age of five then you have a better chance of it sticking, which is why it always bothered me that they left it until secondary school before they started teaching. That's leaving it far too late. That said, it's never too late to give it a shot when you're doing it off your own bat.

seafoid

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Re: Irish language
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2017, 06:23:43 AM »
Download Duolingo. I find it useful for the basics and to help with spelling. Don't worry about making mistakes in what you say and enjoy it. Use the bits you have where you can. Teanglann.ie is a good resource. Ádh mór!

I have been at it mostly solo with duolingo for about 4 years. The only thing I have figured out so far is that I have no gift for language. I think I would be doing a lot better if I could find a conversation group that would match me pint for pint. Ádh mór ort.
That is a pity omo.
Could you not get the Máirtín O Direain poems on iTunes or Amazon and listen to them as you are doing other stuff. Your brain will be working away listening to the rhythms. The book Tacar Dánta has the words.  You can find translations.

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BenDover

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Re: Irish language
« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2017, 09:16:35 AM »
you could try listening to this live http://www.raidiofailte.com/ or they also have a podcast section http://www.raidiofailte.com/podcast/

lurganblue

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Re: Irish language
« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2017, 09:42:57 AM »
I used to be pretty handy at Irish with having done it up to A Level (that wasnt today or yesterday mind you).  My problem was that i never mixed in circles of people who could also speak it. No friends or family etc.  This has meant that i havent used it in over 15 years and thus i've mainly lost it.

Hardy

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Re: Irish language
« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2017, 12:33:39 PM »
I used to be pretty handy at Irish with having done it up to A Level (that wasnt today or yesterday mind you).  My problem was that i never mixed in circles of people who could also speak it. No friends or family etc.  This has meant that i havent used it in over 15 years and thus i've mainly lost it.

I have the same problem as regards practice, so that I would speak hesitantly and struggle for words and expressions, but understand perfectly (apart from some difficulty with the Donegal accent*).

I put down the ease of understanding to years of just listening and for that I thank TG4, Nuacht, Irish language programmes on radio and match commentaries in Irish. Reading Irish columns in newspapers helps too. So I highly recommend all of that. I think if you stay in touch on that level, you would be speaking quite comfortably in a matter of weeks if you were to be immersed in an Irish speaking environment.

* Then again, a member of my extended family is from Ardara and I can only catch about one in three of his words in English.
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