Author Topic: The Many Faces of US Politics...  (Read 537545 times)

seafoid

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seafoid

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Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« Reply #9196 on: May 17, 2017, 07:59:39 AM »
Free Advice to Trump Aides: Quit While You Can
By MICHELLE GOLDBERGMAY 16, 2017
On Monday night, Lt. Gen. H. R. McMaster, President Trump’s widely admired national security adviser, held a hastily convened news conference to try to knock down reports that Mr. Trump had shared highly classified information with Russia — only to have Mr. Trump appear to confirm the reports in two Tuesday morning tweets.
“General McMaster spent decades defending this nation, earning his integrity and honor. Trump squandered it in less than 12 hours,” responded the Republican strategist John Weaver in a tweet. The journalist and former speechwriter for George W. Bush, David Frum, asked: “How does McMaster not resign today? That thing he said ‘did not happen’ the president has just defended doing.”
General McMaster may find a way of avoiding that conclusion for now, but — if the yelling from the inmates of the West Wing is anything to go by — the moral and intellectual contortions now required of those who serve in the White House are extracting a heavy cost. It is tempting to believe, for instance, that the president’s press spokesman Sean Spicer will forever be remembered for the evening Mr. Trump fired the F.B.I. director, James Comey, when Mr. Spicer cowered among the bushes on the White House grounds to avoid journalists. But in all likelihood, Mr. Spicer will soon find himself at the center of yet another humiliating tableau, one that will supplant that last one in the public consciousness.
After all, before people started decorating their shrubbery with Sean Spicer lawn ornaments, he was best known for the petulant, hectoring and surreally dishonest press briefings that Melissa McCarthy immortalized on “Saturday Night Live.” No one knows the next national joke that will have Mr. Spicer as a punch line, but one thing is clear. As long as he works for this president, he is unlikely to recover his dignity.
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The same is true of most people in Mr. Trump’s orbit. To serve this president is to be diminished.
It took Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein a mere two weeks in the administration to trash his sterling reputation through his involvement in Mr. Comey’s firing. Trump associates have tried to pin the blame for the president’s manifold displays of incompetence on the White House chief of staff, Reince Priebus — whose internal nickname, according to The Week, is Rancid — but the truth is that Mr. Trump is ruining Mr. Priebus’s reputation, not vice versa. Lesser-known figures will also probably find that their time in the administration has hindered, rather than helped, their career prospects.
“You don’t find people who mentioned they worked at the Nixon White House unless they were high enough and conspicuous and had to admit it,” John Dean, former White House counsel to Richard Nixon, told me.
Certainly, some who are serving should stay put for the good of the nation. We need sane and competent people like Secretary of Defense James Mattis to remain in government and dissuade the president from cavalierly starting a nuclear war. It’s understandable why career officials in the Justice Department or the State Department would want to hunker down and try to preserve their institutions from Mr. Trump’s wrecking ball. But there are a great many other people, both famous names and faceless officials, whose jobs have nothing to do with safeguarding the republic.
Mr. Trump’s entire communications staff could resign tomorrow without imperiling the citizenry. And for their own good, as well as the good of the nation, they should.
Out in America, Mr. Trump still has plenty of genuine admirers, people who view him as a brilliant, iconoclastic businessman. But there is scant evidence of such respect among the people who actually work with him in Washington. The New York Times recently reported that there are “deep resentments among his scarred staff,” and The Washington Post writes of aides “bewildered and alarmed by how Trump arrives at his decisions.” These men and women are suffering personally while propping up a presidency they appear to hold in contempt. They are allowing themselves to be permanently tarnished through their association with a man whose name is destined to become the root of a political epithet signifying disgrace, like McCarthyite or Nixonian.
They aren’t just selling out their country. They’re selling out themselves.
Great prizes await the first few people to break ranks and tell the country what they know about this corrupt and degenerate presidency. The majority of Americans who fear and disdain Mr. Trump will hail them as patriots. There are book and movie deals to be had and cable contracts to sign.
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The political tell-all can be a lucrative career move. Scott McClellan, a press secretary for George W. Bush, had a No. 1 New York Times best seller with his scathing memoir of the Bush White House, “What Happened: Inside the Bush White House and Washington’s Culture of Deceit.” George Stephanopoulos, a former senior aide to Bill Clinton, wrote a best-selling account of his White House disillusionment, “All Too Human: A Political Education,” which served as part of his transformation from politico to highly paid TV journalist. Mr. Dean, who basically invented the form of White House confessional with his 1976 book “Blind Ambition: The White House Years,” continues to enjoy a successful career as an author and pundit.
Thanks to copious leaks, we already know a lot more about the internal workings of the Trump White House than we do about past administrations, but there is still immense interest in what is really going on and how the major players feel about it. It would be worth the price of a hardcover just to learn how Kellyanne Conway — who, according to the “Morning Joe” hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski, said she needed to shower after defending Mr. Trump during the campaign — sleeps at night.
“There are going to be a lot more best-selling authors coming out of the Trump administration than out of the Obama administration,” said Eric Nelson, the editorial director of Broadside Books, the conservative imprint at HarperCollins. “Trump makes everybody he touches a national story.”
Those who stick around, however, will discover that in politics, being part of a national story can be ruinous. Members of Mr. Clinton’s administration had to shoulder huge legal bills, some running into hundreds of thousands of dollars, after being forced to testify before congressional committees and grand juries. As Mr. Stephanopoulos noted in 1998, “A single trip to the grand jury can cost you $10,000.”
Congressional and legal investigations into Mr. Trump’s presidency — including his ties to Russia, his firing of Mr. Comey and the overlap of his business interests and his governing responsibilities — are likely to be even more extensive than those Mr. Clinton faced, particularly if Democrats take back either house of Congress next year.
“Anybody who is there now, if they’re anywhere close to the problems, they’re probably going to need an attorney, and it’s going to get expensive,” Mr. Dean warned. “I think a lot of people are going to get hurt.”
Allies of the Clintons set up legal defense funds to pay off some of their aides’ bills. People working for this administration should ask themselves whether they are confident that anyone close to Mr. Trump, a man notorious for stiffing his contractors, would do the same.
Ordinarily, whistle-blowers have to decide between following the moral course of action and looking out for their own material security. For officials contemplating jumping off the sinking ship of the Trump presidency, however, ethical and venal incentives are in unusual alignment. The time is ripe to get out.
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screenexile

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Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« Reply #9197 on: May 17, 2017, 04:00:09 PM »
Jesus did anyone see the video footage of Erdogans goons having a go at protesters outside the Turkish Embassy? Kicking women in the head while they lied on the ground and everything it's harrowing you can only imagine what people are going through in Turkey itself!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CcuCZemRo84

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Denn Forever

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Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« Reply #9198 on: May 17, 2017, 04:57:58 PM »
you know that if Trump goes, next  is Pence.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2017, 05:00:11 PM by Denn Forever »
I have more respect for a man
that says what he means and
means what he says...

Eamonnca1

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Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« Reply #9199 on: May 17, 2017, 06:22:54 PM »
Pence might be another evil sumbitch but at least he know what he's doing. The current president is a complete loose cannon.

mrdeeds

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Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« Reply #9200 on: May 17, 2017, 08:00:15 PM »
Trump just boasted to US Coast Guard cadets about how much he’s ‘saved them’ on the F-35 and Ford class carriers. The Coast Guard operates neither.

Gabriel_Hurl

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Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« Reply #9201 on: May 17, 2017, 11:42:02 PM »
« Last Edit: May 18, 2017, 12:01:07 AM by Gabriel_Hurl »

foxcommander

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Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« Reply #9202 on: May 18, 2017, 08:02:22 PM »
The typical hysterical democrat position that we've come to expect, call someone a racist, fascist, sexist etc if you don't like someones point of view.

The Democratic position is to call someone a racist, fascist, or sexist if they're a racist, fascist, sexist. The conservative response is to cry like a wounded puppy about how the big boys are picking on you.
Hey Eamon - People in glass houses and all that.

racist - Black Lives Matter
fascist - the occupy Protestors and their denying of free speech
sexist  - Bill Clinton

Democrats have ticked the boxes. Yet to see them correct themselves in their disgusting behaviour.
Every second of the day there's a Democrat telling a lie

Declan

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Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« Reply #9203 on: May 19, 2017, 08:47:39 AM »
Quote
Democrats have ticked the boxes. Yet to see them correct themselves in their disgusting behaviour.


Exactly - Remember when we had Obama's scandals to deal with  ;)?
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Declan

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Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« Reply #9204 on: May 19, 2017, 08:53:51 AM »
Hard to believe the exchange below

“This is like something straight out of George Orwell.”
by Bess Levin,
May 18, 2017 5:30 pm

Few of Donald Trump’s genuinely populist economic proposals from the campaign trail seem to have survived the transition to the White House. In retrospect, it seems foolish to have put any stock whatsoever in his sundry musings about “the government” paying for everyone’s health care, or hedge funds “getting away with murder,” or how the wealthy should “pay more” in taxes, or how he’d like to see a minimum wage “increase of some magnitude.” Each of those proposals was quickly replaced by its opposite, almost as if Trump doesn’t care about the words he says or actually believe in anything at all.

So it should come as no surprise that Donald Trump has vacillated on the possibility of bringing back Glass-Steagall, the Depression-era law that separated commercial and investment banks until 1999 and the repeal of which some people blame for the financial crisis. “I’m looking at that right now,“ Trump told Bloomberg earlier this month. “There’s some people that want to go back to the old system, right? So we’re going to look at that.”

Historically, a sitting president mulling the possibility of breaking up the big banks would have sent shivers down the spines of Wall Street C.E.O.s, with a market reaction to match. Instead, investors barely blinked. Because, by their own admission, no one on Wall Street really takes Trump seriously anymore. At this point, they’re fully aware of the fact that by a quirk of biology, the president’s brain is not connected to his mouth and so the words just tumble out at will. “I don't take Trump seriously,” a senior executive with “one of the country’s six largest banks” told Reuters earlier this month. “I’m listening less and less.” “Break up the banks? That ain’t going to happen,” Citigroup adviser Rick Hohlt told Bloomberg.

The pronouncements of other Trump minions appear similarly worthless. Lately, some administration officials have taken to using the term “21st-century Glass-Steagall”—a term they claim does not actually involve breaking up banks, which is kind of like when Ivanka Trump said she was “complicit,” if complicit meant “wanting to be a force for good and to make a positive impact.”

Senator Elizabeth Warren is a very smart woman who, like Wall Street, is presumably wise to the fact that one cannot take Trump and Co. literally or seriously. But bringing back Glass-Steagall is something she’s advocated for years, having introduced just such a proposal in 2015. So when Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin showed up to testify before the Senate Banking Committee on Thursday, she decided to take the opportunity to force him to admit that when Donald Trump says he’s “looking into” breaking up the banks, he’s actually full of it. The result was an absolutely surreal exchange that must be read in full:

Elizabeth Warren: You said we need a 21st-century Glass-Steagall at your confirmation hearing. And now you’ve just said the opposite. In the past few months, you and the president have had a number of meetings with big-bank C.E.O.s and lobbyists—is that the reason for the reversal on Glass-Stegall?

Steven Mnuchin: Not at all; there actually wasn’t a reversal.

Warren: There wasn’t a reversal?

Mnuchin: Let me explain.

Warren: I’m ready.

Mnuchin: The Republican platform did have Glass-Stegall. . . . The president said we do support a 21st-century Glass-Steagall, that means there are aspects of it that we think may make sense. But we never said before we support a full separation of banks and investment banking.

Warren: Let me just stop you right there, Mr. Secretary—

Mnuchin: You’re not letting me finish—

Warren: Yeah, I'm not, because I really need to understand what you’ve just said. There are aspects of Glass-Steagall that you support, but not breaking up the banks and separating commercial banking from investment banking? What do you think Glass-Stegall was if that's not right at the heart of it?

Mnuchin: Again, I’m well aware of what Glass-Steagall was, as you may know the original concern of Glass-Steagall was about conflicts not about credit risk, and if we had supported a full Glass-Stegall we would have said at the time we believed in Glass-Stegall, not a 21st-century Glass-Stegall. We were very clear in differentiating it.

Warren: I still haven’t heard the answer to my question; what do you think Glass-Stegall was if not separating commercial banking from investment banking, from ordinary banking?

Mnuchin: Again, the fundamental part of Glass-Stegall was, as you just outlined, it was separation of investment banking from commercial banking because people were concerned about conflicts.

Warren: And how do you separate without breaking up the big banks that have integrated these two things?

Mnuchin: Again, the integration of commercial banking and investment banking has gone on for a long time, that’s not what caused the financial crisis, and if we did go back to a full separation, you would have an enormous impact on liquidity and lending.

Warren: So let me get this straight. You’re saying you’re in favor of Glass-Steagall, which breaks apart the two arms of the banks, except you don’t want to break apart the two parts of banking. This is like something straight out of George Orwell. You’re saying simultaneously you’re in favor of breaking up the banks— that’s what Glass-Steagall is—

Mnuchin: I never said we were in favor of breaking up the banks. If we had been, it would have been very simple .

Warren: Let me try one more time—what does it mean to be in favor of 21st-century Glass-Steagall if it does not mean breaking apart these two functions in banking?

Mnuchin: I’d be more than happy to come see you and follow up—

Warren: Just tell me what it means. Tell me what 21st-century Glass-Steagall means if it doesn’t mean breaking up those two parts. It’s an easy question.

Mnuchin: It’s actually a complicated question—

Warren: I’ll bet.

Mnuchin: There are many aspects of it. The simple answer is we don’t support breaking up commercial and investment banks. We think that would be a huge mistake, but, again, I’m more than happy to listen to your ideas on it, you obviously have strong views.

Warren: This is just bizarre. The idea that you can say we’re in favor of Glass-Steagall but not in breaking up the banks.

Mnuchin: We never said we were in favor of Glass-Steagall, we said we were in favor of a 21st-century Glass-Steagall. We couldn’t be clearer.

Warren: Thank you . . . this is crazy.

seafoid

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seafoid

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Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« Reply #9206 on: May 19, 2017, 04:38:09 PM »
Michelle Ye Hee Lee‏ 

Since Inauguration Day, President Trump has made 586 false or misleading claims. http://wapo.st/trumpclaimsdb
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omochain

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Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« Reply #9207 on: May 22, 2017, 04:18:58 AM »
Silence.. Did somebody impeach Trump😇


screenexile

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Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« Reply #9209 on: May 22, 2017, 09:57:27 AM »
Hannity getting stuck into the tin hat Seth Rich nonsense now . . . but it's only the lame stream media that indulge in fake news!!  ::) ::)