Author Topic: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.  (Read 76591 times)

HiMucker

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1680 on: December 06, 2017, 06:11:26 PM »
Absolute bullshit.Catholic and Protestant professional classes always  lived together in the leafy suburbs,even in Portadown.I spent my early years in the Killicomaine Housing estate,mixed then,but now a loyalist enclave,in the same housing conditions as many Protestants.My parents,both born in the 1920s,were never once out of work,and enjoyed or suffered the same terms and conditions as their fellow,vastly predominantly Protestant work colleagues.

The access to free education introduced by the British Labour Party post WWII benefitted Catholics far more than Protestants and led to the educated civil rights leaders like Hume,Bernadette Devlin, and Mc Cann etc.
Absolute bullshit?  So this better education led to these well educated types you listed to take up civil rights issues when none existed?  :o   ;D Seriously where do you pull this drivel from?

T Fearon

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1681 on: December 06, 2017, 06:15:21 PM »
I am not saying there wasn't discrimination,but it was exaggerated,as my own family experiences in Portadown.It certainly didn't impact at all on the catholic middle classes.Without access to free education,those who brought about radical change,like Hume,Devlin etc would never have emerged

02

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1682 on: December 06, 2017, 06:35:50 PM »
I am not saying there wasn't discrimination,but it was exaggerated,as my own family experiences in Portadown.It certainly didn't impact at all on the catholic middle classes.Without access to free education,those who brought about radical change,like Hume,Devlin etc would never have emerged

I know I shouldn't as looking for attention but to generalise from your family's situation to the entire population is silly, unemployment rates for Catholics in the 1983 Household survey were 2.5 times worse than for protestants, so really exaggerated (and this 16 years after the civil rights movement started).
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T Fearon

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1683 on: December 06, 2017, 06:43:30 PM »
1983? That was nearly 40 years ago.We are talking here about unskilled labour or potential labour,many of whom probably didn't want to work.The discrimination was bad but not nearly as bad as myth would have it,and the professional classes never suffered one iota.Compare this with the South at the time with no welfare state and many families and communities decimated by enforced economic emigration.

The Unionist big house rulers of the 20th century treated Shankhill Protestant working classes etc with the utmost contempt.

Rossfan

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1684 on: December 06, 2017, 07:32:28 PM »
Jasus now he's telling us we had no social welfare here in 1983 :-\
And is he implying that Northern Catholics were too lazy to work?
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T Fearon

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1685 on: December 06, 2017, 09:09:50 PM »
I wouldn't expect you to understand but a lot of households with large families up here attracted benefit levels that made employment not worthwhile.Those large families were invariably catholic.

Dougal Maguire

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1686 on: December 06, 2017, 09:20:38 PM »
I am not saying there wasn't discrimination,but it was exaggerated,as my own family experiences in Portadown.It certainly didn't impact at all on the catholic middle classes.Without access to free education,those who brought about radical change,like Hume,Devlin etc would never have emerged
Yeah?  Tell that to Catholics looking for Council houses.
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Owen Brannigan

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1687 on: December 06, 2017, 09:48:42 PM »
I am not saying there wasn't discrimination,but it was exaggerated,as my own family experiences in Portadown.It certainly didn't impact at all on the catholic middle classes.Without access to free education,those who brought about radical change,like Hume,Devlin etc would never have emerged

I think you will find that Paddy Devlin didn't avail of much of the free education, he was born in 1925 and free education at secondary level didn't become available until 1947.


seafoid

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1688 on: December 06, 2017, 09:53:02 PM »
I am not saying there wasn't discrimination,but it was exaggerated,as my own family experiences in Portadown.It certainly didn't impact at all on the catholic middle classes.Without access to free education,those who brought about radical change,like Hume,Devlin etc would never have emerged
If it was all tickety boo the NI state would not have collapsed into inter communal violence in the late 60s  . The Unionists could have been decent but it always was less attractive than the status quo.
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red hander

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1689 on: December 06, 2017, 09:58:47 PM »
I am not saying there wasn't discrimination,but it was exaggerated,as my own family experiences in Portadown.It certainly didn't impact at all on the catholic middle classes.Without access to free education,those who brought about radical change,like Hume,Devlin etc would never have emerged

This is the mantra of unionism used to try and blame one side for the last 40 years. I'm saddened, but not surprised, that you are also repeating this bullshit, especially being from Portadown, whose nationalist population suffered more than many under the loyalist jackboot.

T Fearon

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1690 on: December 06, 2017, 10:10:19 PM »
Look,ffs,my parents both left school at 14,with no qualifications.They were never unemployed in their lives.We lived in Portadown,a town that was entirely mixed until the troubles/IRA campaign started  (which were unnecessary according to the SDLP and all Freestate parties) drove people into sectarian housing,and the driving out was done on both sides.We never had a moment's trouble with anyone of a different religion,and up to 1990 we lived in predominantly Protestant neighbourhoods.Courtesy of British funded education myself and late brother (who would,despite coming from a very low socio economic background,become a GP),both attained third level education and social mobility my parents could only dream of.

We were nothing special,we worked hard to avail of all opportunities,and sacrifices made by our parents,which everyone else had.So forgive me for not feeling deprived or discriminated against.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 10:13:30 PM by T Fearon »

BennyCake

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1691 on: December 06, 2017, 10:29:17 PM »
Not all were as lucky as your parents, T.

Heard the story many times Catholics going for jobs. What school/Sunday school did you go to? St Patrick's, Sacred Heart... We'll let you know. Catholics were abused by the system. Generation after generation in dirty filthy low paid jobs (if lucky), their children the same. No chance for bettering themselves. Protestant Sammy's snottery-arsed son get a job ahead of a hardworking catholic man with a family. Many who did get jobs suffered serious sectarian abuse. It was pure rotten. And that's just employment.

T Fearon

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1692 on: December 06, 2017, 10:37:22 PM »
I don't believe it was half as bad as it was made out.There were a lot of people like the proverbial stammerer who failed to get a newsreader's job and attributed it to being a Catholic.I know people who attribute all of their lifelong misfortunes to the fact that they were Catholics,ffs.My parents were never lucky,they were typical of their era,hard working,not ambitious,decent and honest as the day is long,and simply hopeful that their two boys would make the most of opportunities they never had.Now if that could all be done in "Black" Portadown it could have been done anywhere by any Catholic.

And I'm not even going to mention the Catholics born with the silver spoons in their mouths that lived well away from the riff raff Catholics and Protestants of the Lower Order.

Dougal Maguire

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1693 on: December 06, 2017, 10:47:40 PM »
So why is it only n recent years that Catholics made it to the top in the Civil Service. I know you're a wind up merchant but the extremes you'll go to get an arguement going are unreal. You appear to lead a sad empty life spending your time posting on Internet forums where you post what should be private information about yourself to people who couldn't give a toss about you and doing silly competitions in magazines.
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red hander

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1694 on: December 06, 2017, 10:51:54 PM »
Look,ffs,my parents both left school at 14,with no qualifications.They were never unemployed in their lives.We lived in Portadown,a town that was entirely mixed until the troubles/IRA campaign started  (which were unnecessary according to the SDLP and all Freestate parties) drove people into sectarian housing,and the driving out was done on both sides.We never had a moment's trouble with anyone of a different religion,and up to 1990 we lived in predominantly Protestant neighbourhoods.Courtesy of British funded education myself and late brother (who would,despite coming from a very low socio economic background,become a GP),both attained third level education and social mobility my parents could only dream of.

We were nothing special,we worked hard to avail of all opportunities,and sacrifices made by our parents,which everyone else had.So forgive me for not feeling deprived or discriminated against.

My family on my mother's side were Tunnel born and bred. That wasn't their experience going all the way back to partition and before. It was the big bad IRA's fault  ::)