Author Topic: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.  (Read 76554 times)

OgraAnDun

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1725 on: December 07, 2017, 03:42:43 PM »
I am sure like me you know a lot of people who neither worked nor wanted.I am not saying discrimination didn't happen but it was and is still exaggerated.I can only opine on my own family and my parents oft repeated words,there's work for those who want it. Catholics had access to all public services etc and the Catholic education system was fully facilitated.

The middle classes on both sides had it easy,no peace walls etc.

Now we understand why this is the world (an independent north) that you want to go back to, with no oversight from either the British or Irish governments to make sure one community doesn't run roughshod over the other. Everything was a land of roses and honey and if it wasn't for NICRA and their devious plot to invent sectarian tensions, that is the way it would always have remained.

tonto1888

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1726 on: December 07, 2017, 03:56:48 PM »
My childhood was pre troubles.I have presented a fully factual accurate account of my family's life and experience and achievements from a very low socio economic background,with parents who were never out of work,living for over 30 years of my life,pre and through the troubles in predominantly Protestant areas without trouble.Hell, my parents were members of many cross community charity groups they even received and accepted an invite to a garden party with Royalty at Hillsborough Castle once as members of one of these groups.Something I confess I wouldn't have accepted,but then they didn't see stereotypes,they saw people who they respected,and respected them in return.

We didn't go around thinking we were akin to black people in Alabama,nor attribute all of life's many inevitable disappointments to the fact that we were Catholics.We just got on with it.

My mother was born in 1953 so pre troubles. She lived in Redmonville and it certainly was not as idyllic as you describe. Did she run a gauntlet everyday? No. But she was spat upon by a neighbour - one named in a couple of books if memory serves me right - and her family members were threatened on numerous occasions. Now she got a job teaching in St Brigids, later Drumcree, but not everyone was as lucky as her and I can assure you, for many, it was not down to not wanting to work

BennyCake

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1727 on: December 07, 2017, 03:58:18 PM »
Branching off a bit here, but with Fair Employment introduced which enabled more Catholics to get certain jobs. Now that's in place, has even those Catholics been forced down the list and LBGT's taken priority for jobs? Just a thought.

Syferus

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1728 on: December 07, 2017, 04:02:10 PM »
Branching off a bit here, but with Fair Employment introduced which enabled more Catholics to get certain jobs. Now that's in place, has even those Catholics been forced down the list and LBGT's taken priority for jobs? Just a thought.

A terrible, regressive thought that ignores the very basic laws of recruitment. Do you think a gay person has their sexuality tattooed on their forehead or something?

If you're going to try to vaguely target a minority group at least spell it right.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2017, 04:04:45 PM by Syferus »

yellowcard

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1729 on: December 07, 2017, 04:15:38 PM »
So the latest ruse is that discrimination was just an excuse for all those low life failure's in society who never made anything of themselves. Just because you personally were so wonderful to be able to overcome any prejudice and become a member of the middle class in society does not make it true for a whole population of catholics.   

red hander

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1730 on: December 07, 2017, 04:34:47 PM »
I am sure like me you know a lot of people who neither worked nor wanted.I am not saying discrimination didn't happen but it was and is still exaggerated.I can only opine on my own family and my parents oft repeated words,there's work for those who want it. Catholics had access to all public services etc and the Catholic education system was fully facilitated.

The middle classes on both sides had it easy,no peace walls etc.

You really are a deluded fool  :-[

BennyCake

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1731 on: December 07, 2017, 04:55:18 PM »
Branching off a bit here, but with Fair Employment introduced which enabled more Catholics to get certain jobs. Now that's in place, has even those Catholics been forced down the list and LBGT's taken priority for jobs? Just a thought.

A terrible, regressive thought that ignores the very basic laws of recruitment. Do you think a gay person has their sexuality tattooed on their forehead or something?

If you're going to try to vaguely target a minority group at least spell it right.

It's an acronym. You cant "spell" an acronym.

Well, if a gay thought by declaring they were gay on a form (which I presume is an option these days), they might declare it if they thought it would increase their chances.

north_antrim_hound

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1732 on: December 07, 2017, 05:11:49 PM »
I am sure like me you know a lot of people who neither worked nor wanted.I am not saying discrimination didn't happen but it was and is still exaggerated.I can only opine on my own family and my parents oft repeated words,there's work for those who want it. Catholics had access to all public services etc and the Catholic education system was fully facilitated.

The middle classes on both sides had it easy,no peace walls etc.

You really are a deluded fool  :-[

+1
As a catholic who was never out of work ( most of us are the same) I find this mentality offensive
Just because i have a work ethic instilled by great parents doesn’t mean I belong in some ivory tower where I can look down and judge the lesser privileged

On the imbalance of civil rights that prevailed against catholics during this era
If a United Ireland was ever achieved we must ensure that the protestant communities are held as equals or we have endured those hardships for nothing
Any thing else would be to unionists for me   
 

AQMP

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1733 on: December 07, 2017, 05:30:36 PM »
Latest Lucid Talk poll (a rather long question!):

In the context of a "Hard Brexit" and NI leaving the EU with no deal on the border, GFA or citizens' rights: if the question used in in an NI Border Poll Referendum was:

Should NI REMAIN in the EU bu joining with the Republic of Ireland or LEAVE the EU by staying in the UK?

If the poll were tomorrow which way would you vote?

REMAIN in EU by joining with RoI:    47.9%
LEAVE the EU by staying in the UK:  45.4%
D/K but would vote:                             6.0%
Wouldn't vote:                                     0.7%

armaghniac

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1734 on: December 07, 2017, 05:43:32 PM »
Latest Lucid Talk poll (a rather long question!):

In the context of a "Hard Brexit" and NI leaving the EU with no deal on the border, GFA or citizens' rights: if the question used in in an NI Border Poll Referendum was:

Should NI REMAIN in the EU bu joining with the Republic of Ireland or LEAVE the EU by staying in the UK?

If the poll were tomorrow which way would you vote?

REMAIN in EU by joining with RoI:    47.9%
LEAVE the EU by staying in the UK:  45.4%
D/K but would vote:                             6.0%
Wouldn't vote:                                     0.7%

That's a first!
This might soften the DUPs cough and encourage not putting things to the test.
if at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

T Fearon

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1735 on: December 07, 2017, 05:45:11 PM »
Did you talk to any of the Protestants in Portadown forced out of Ballyoran,Churchill Park? I think undoubtedly there was a Protestant work ethic that was not shared by all catholics as well.Discrimination here, like in Scotland back in the day was not institutional but practiced by certain individuals who wielded too much power.It was exaggerated,and in any case has long since been defeated.It had no impact on my life or any of my family and I was born and reared in arguably the North's most staunchly Protestant town.

By the way your good friends in the DUP sit in government with SF here, something FF and FG have pledged never to do in Dublin.Do you see this as being discriminatory?

armaghniac

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1736 on: December 07, 2017, 05:45:59 PM »
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The undecideds are mostly middle of the road, as likely to go one way as the other.
if at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

T Fearon

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1737 on: December 07, 2017, 06:02:41 PM »
Er has anyone asked the Dublin Govt or people in the South? I will bet money that any referendum would not reach anywhere near 40% in favour of unity and I'd doubt if it would endorse the North staying in the EU.Dont get over excited.

red hander

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1738 on: December 07, 2017, 06:07:15 PM »
Did you talk to any of the Protestants in Portadown forced out of Ballyoran,Churchill Park? I think undoubtedly there was a Protestant work ethic that was not shared by all catholics as well.Discrimination here, like in Scotland back in the day was not institutional but practiced by certain individuals who wielded too much power.It was exaggerated,and in any case has long since been defeated.It had no impact on my life or any of my family and I was born and reared in arguably the North's most staunchly Protestant town.

By the way your good friends in the DUP sit in government with SF here, something FF and FG have pledged never to do in Dublin.Do you see this as being discriminatory?

You need help. I fear for your mental wellbeing, I really do

T Fearon

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #1739 on: December 07, 2017, 06:16:18 PM »
And you would know what about it? Were you even born 50 years ago?