Author Topic: No Country for Women - RTE1  (Read 1279 times)

easytiger95

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Re: No Country for Women - RTE1
« Reply #15 on: June 22, 2018, 10:06:53 AM »
Saw the documentary, it was a really great piece of work, I think.

I loved the approach of using Lavinia Kerwick, not as a narrator or as a guide, but more of a witness to the horrors she and others endured.

Well worth watching the next instalments.

magpie seanie

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Re: No Country for Women - RTE1
« Reply #16 on: June 22, 2018, 10:52:12 AM »
Saw the documentary, it was a really great piece of work, I think.

I loved the approach of using Lavinia Kerwick, not as a narrator or as a guide, but more of a witness to the horrors she and others endured.

Well worth watching the next instalments.


Glad to see her looking and appearing to be well after all she was put through.

IolarCoisCuain

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Re: No Country for Women - RTE1
« Reply #17 on: June 22, 2018, 08:49:49 PM »
The men of 1916 established a democracy, where women had the same vote as men. If that is what people wanted then that is a fair outcome of 1916.


What about the women of 1916? The rest of your post displays similar ignorance....I'd advise you have a watch if you can access the documentary. The treatment of women by the Republic of Ireland government since 1922 has been totally scandalous and vastly at odds with the ideals of those brave people who fought in 1916.

I didn't know that the men of '16 were woke as well as everything else. Most of them were shot before women got the vote, so the news that a patriarchal, Church-dominated state would have been a horror to them comes as news to me.

Can you point me to where I can read up on Padraig Pearse's attitude towards the patriarchy, or Thomas Clarke's opinion on LGBTQ issues? Where can I learn about what Eamon Ceannt believed with regard to intersectional feminism, or find out JM Plunkett's views on toxic masculinity? I want to learn.

seafoid

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Re: No Country for Women - RTE1
« Reply #18 on: June 23, 2018, 11:29:42 AM »
The men of 1916 established a democracy, where women had the same vote as men. If that is what people wanted then that is a fair outcome of 1916.


What about the women of 1916? The rest of your post displays similar ignorance....I'd advise you have a watch if you can access the documentary. The treatment of women by the Republic of Ireland government since 1922 has been totally scandalous and vastly at odds with the ideals of those brave people who fought in 1916.

I didn't know that the men of '16 were woke as well as everything else. Most of them were shot before women got the vote, so the news that a patriarchal, Church-dominated state would have been a horror to them comes as news to me.

Can you point me to where I can read up on Padraig Pearse's attitude towards the patriarchy, or Thomas Clarke's opinion on LGBTQ issues? Where can I learn about what Eamon Ceannt believed with regard to intersectional feminism, or find out JM Plunkett's views on toxic masculinity? I want to learn.
Just look at the proclamation or read Hyde or Yeats about the change they were expecting and compare to what actually happened. Many of the elites who drove independence were  progressive. The people were not  . You cannot change groupthink overnight.
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Syferus

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Re: No Country for Women - RTE1
« Reply #19 on: June 23, 2018, 01:07:57 PM »
The men of 1916 established a democracy, where women had the same vote as men. If that is what people wanted then that is a fair outcome of 1916.


What about the women of 1916? The rest of your post displays similar ignorance....I'd advise you have a watch if you can access the documentary. The treatment of women by the Republic of Ireland government since 1922 has been totally scandalous and vastly at odds with the ideals of those brave people who fought in 1916.

I didn't know that the men of '16 were woke as well as everything else. Most of them were shot before women got the vote, so the news that a patriarchal, Church-dominated state would have been a horror to them comes as news to me.

Can you point me to where I can read up on Padraig Pearse's attitude towards the patriarchy, or Thomas Clarke's opinion on LGBTQ issues? Where can I learn about what Eamon Ceannt believed with regard to intersectional feminism, or find out JM Plunkett's views on toxic masculinity? I want to learn.

This is a very weird post filled with a dismissive tone that is at total odds with the seriousness of the topics being talked about. It reads like a screed that wouldn't be out of place on an alt-right subreddit or in the comments of Breitbart News. For your sake I hope you just mangled what you actually meant.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2018, 01:10:16 PM by Syferus »

magpie seanie

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Re: No Country for Women - RTE1
« Reply #20 on: June 23, 2018, 09:11:51 PM »
The men of 1916 established a democracy, where women had the same vote as men. If that is what people wanted then that is a fair outcome of 1916.


What about the women of 1916? The rest of your post displays similar ignorance....I'd advise you have a watch if you can access the documentary. The treatment of women by the Republic of Ireland government since 1922 has been totally scandalous and vastly at odds with the ideals of those brave people who fought in 1916.

I didn't know that the men of '16 were woke as well as everything else. Most of them were shot before women got the vote, so the news that a patriarchal, Church-dominated state would have been a horror to them comes as news to me.

Can you point me to where I can read up on Padraig Pearse's attitude towards the patriarchy, or Thomas Clarke's opinion on LGBTQ issues? Where can I learn about what Eamon Ceannt believed with regard to intersectional feminism, or find out JM Plunkett's views on toxic masculinity? I want to learn.


Read the proclamation. I read it often. It's how we were supposed to live in the Irish Republic.

I find your post quite disappointing. Really ridiculing my points with no facts at all to back up your reasoning.

BarryBreensBandage

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Re: No Country for Women - RTE1
« Reply #21 on: June 24, 2018, 11:49:45 PM »
The ideals of 1916 were not reflected in the values of the society at the time. The economy was based on owning land and that is not very pro women.


From Irish times comments

AnChiarogEile
 


@Honey The ferocious puritanism of Irish Catholicism in the 19th and 20th centuries probably stems as much from the experience of the Famine as from the Church's own dogma. People had seen in the starkest form imaginable where early marriage and big families tended to lead in an entirely rural country, so post-1850 they went in for rigorous population control by the only means available at the time: not having sex until you could afford to maintain a family; which for many people like Michael Collins's father meant their late sixties, and for many more people meant "never". A moral constabulary was needed to police this social order: and the Church gladly stepped into that role. The only trouble was that in Ireland the regime thus imposed lasted well into the age of efficient birth control, long after it had disappeared even in countries like Spain. But the urge to dictate is still there in ghostly form: a bit like a dog turning round several times before it lies down to sleep, flattening the undergrowth of the forests where its ancestors lived.

A look at the 1901 and 1911 census tells the above story. Oldest Sons waited for younger siblings to clear off! Men were in their 40's before Marriage marrying women up to 20 years younger than them. These women in turn could be widows for up 30 years.

Happened in my family too.


Very interesting - just thinking about this today.
I was at Cemetery Sunday this morning, and have noticed in the past, and today the other gravestones where, in proximity to our family grave, on every gravestone, the wife outlived the husband; and most by 20 years or so.
I never knew about this policy and generally thought that the men's health round our area through job conditions, lifestyle was the main reason. But this explains it in a nutshell. Thanks for the post.
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