Author Topic: Tom Humphries  (Read 26375 times)

saffron sam2

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #60 on: March 08, 2017, 09:37:51 PM »
Unfortunately, whilst Humphries is without doubt a talented and entertaining writer his stock has gone somewhat in my opinion for a couple of reasons.  Firstly, his book "Laptop Dancing and the Nanny Goat Mambo" was so strewn with basic factual errors that the amount of research done must be questioned.  Secondly, on the eve of the 2003 All-Ireland final he did a disgracefully sanitised full page article the history of the Ballygawley / Glencull split.  The article suggesting that the disagreement was a mere misunderstanding and that resolving the split was the easiet thing ever.  A good journalist would have the balls to write honestly about the story, not to appease the big names being written about.

Howeevr, he is spot on iwth Micheal Grennan.
What were the factual errors ss? I read the book years ago and at the time I really enjoyed it.

Been a day or two since I read it myself, but if I wrote it, it must be true.
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Minder

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #61 on: March 08, 2017, 09:38:38 PM »
Unfortunately, whilst Humphries is without doubt a talented and entertaining writer his stock has gone somewhat in my opinion for a couple of reasons.  Firstly, his book "Laptop Dancing and the Nanny Goat Mambo" was so strewn with basic factual errors that the amount of research done must be questioned.  Secondly, on the eve of the 2003 All-Ireland final he did a disgracefully sanitised full page article the history of the Ballygawley / Glencull split.  The article suggesting that the disagreement was a mere misunderstanding and that resolving the split was the easiet thing ever.  A good journalist would have the balls to write honestly about the story, not to appease the big names being written about.

Howeevr, he is spot on iwth Micheal Grennan.
What were the factual errors ss? I read the book years ago and at the time I really enjoyed it.

Been a day or two since I read it myself, but if I wrote it, it must be true.

Just the 10 years ago
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magpie seanie

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #62 on: March 15, 2017, 12:53:20 AM »
I feel sick with myself for enjoying his writing. I know that's not logical but I feel that way. Hope he pays properly for what he has done.

J70

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #63 on: March 15, 2017, 04:53:15 PM »
I feel sick with myself for enjoying his writing. I know that's not logical but I feel that way. Hope he pays properly for what he has done.

Why?

You didn't know what he was up to.

And what he was up to does not change the fact that he was a superb sports journalist.

AZOffaly

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #64 on: March 15, 2017, 05:22:11 PM »
Can you disassociate like that though? When you 'like' a writer, you tend to agree with him on things, or admire his opinions, because lads like Humphries stopped being mere reporters a long time ago. They are the opinionators in the sports world. So can you disassociate what we now know about him, from his writing skill? Or does the fact that he took advantage of his position in a GAA club, and probably his position in life, to commit acts like this against a girl mean that all his writing is tainted?

Tough one.

If, as part of Humphries rehabilitation, he was allowed publish (pro bono) pieces that were purely about sport. Should he be allowed do that, and would you buy the paper that published it, or read the pieces?


Jinxy

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #65 on: March 15, 2017, 07:25:44 PM »
I had a few of his books and I dumped them.
I couldn't enjoy reading them.
For the same reason I would never watch any of Roman Polanski's films.
Or Woody Allen's for that matter.
If you were any use you'd be playing.

seafoid

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #66 on: March 15, 2017, 08:28:59 PM »
I remember his stuff in the 90s when it was exciting and very different to other sports journalism. But well before he got into that trouble his work was stale and predictable. I gave up reading his column around 2005. The decline professionally and the lapse into criminal behaviour are probably linked
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shark

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #67 on: March 15, 2017, 08:37:51 PM »
I can identify with a lot of what is being written here. I loved his writing. His Monday morning articles in the IT especially. There was one the day after Kilkenny beat Tipp in an All-Ireland semi (I think) that was particularly memorable. I went out of my way to have a conversation with him when I saw him at the Feile na Gael in Mullingar in 2003.
Since the news on him came out it feels almost disappointing that I enjoyed his writing and extremely disappointing that I enjoyed our brief conversation at the Feile. Especially given that he was there, in my club, watching a Camoige match.

Main Street

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #68 on: March 15, 2017, 09:25:36 PM »
I have a memory of enjoying his articles and the nanny goat book, but that's an experience from the distant past and now this underage abuse just means he fades out of my memory. Whereas someone like Con Houlihan, his memory and writings will live forever.

Jinxy

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #69 on: March 16, 2017, 11:03:42 AM »
The thing for me is if you enjoy the work of a musician, or a writer, or any sort of artist, you develop a sense of identification with them.
What they create appeals to you, therefore when you think of them, it's generally in a positive way, even if they're a bit of an asshole in real life (as many of them are).
However, we're not talking about someone punching an over zealous fan or being caught taking coke here.
Lets say you're a big Bob Dylan fan and you find out tomorrow he's murdered someone.
Could you still enjoy his music?
You can't separate the 'art' from the 'artist'.
Well, I can't anyway.
If you were any use you'd be playing.

Main Street

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #70 on: March 16, 2017, 01:49:11 PM »
The thing for me is if you enjoy the work of a musician, or a writer, or any sort of artist, you develop a sense of identification with them.
What they create appeals to you, therefore when you think of them, it's generally in a positive way, even if they're a bit of an asshole in real life (as many of them are).
However, we're not talking about someone punching an over zealous fan or being caught taking coke here.
Lets say you're a big Bob Dylan fan and you find out tomorrow he's murdered someone.
Could you still enjoy his music?

You can't separate the 'art' from the 'artist'.
Well, I can't anyway.

Strawman's argument

Jinxy

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #71 on: March 16, 2017, 04:15:14 PM »
How?
If you were any use you'd be playing.

Avondhu star

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #72 on: March 16, 2017, 06:51:08 PM »
Can you disassociate like that though? When you 'like' a writer, you tend to agree with him on things, or admire his opinions, because lads like Humphries stopped being mere reporters a long time ago. They are the opinionators in the sports world. So can you disassociate what we now know about him, from his writing skill? Or does the fact that he took advantage of his position in a GAA club, and probably his position in life, to commit acts like this against a girl mean that all his writing is tainted?

Tough one.

If, as part of Humphries rehabilitation, he was allowed publish (pro bono) pieces that were purely about sport. Should he be allowed do that, and would you buy the paper that published it, or read the pieces?

Thats a good idea. Send out to cover a few camogie games
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Jell 0 Biafra

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #73 on: March 18, 2017, 02:31:31 PM »
The thing for me is if you enjoy the work of a musician, or a writer, or any sort of artist, you develop a sense of identification with them.
What they create appeals to you, therefore when you think of them, it's generally in a positive way, even if they're a bit of an asshole in real life (as many of them are).
However, we're not talking about someone punching an over zealous fan or being caught taking coke here.
Lets say you're a big Bob Dylan fan and you find out tomorrow he's murdered someone.
Could you still enjoy his music?

You can't separate the 'art' from the 'artist'.
Well, I can't anyway.

It would depend on who he killed.  I could see liking him more in certain cases.

Main Street

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Re: Tom Humphries
« Reply #74 on: March 18, 2017, 09:29:49 PM »
How?
Bob Dylan hasn't killed anybody so I haven't a clue how I would feel about his music in that hypothetical event. I might be affected or I might not, I don't know.
Bob Dylan's art versus the Nanny Goat's? I don't know about you  but as it stands now, nobel prize winner  Bob is a messiah in the world of art/music
I might find it difficult to separate Bob from his art or I might not and carry on appreciating his work.  but i have no difficulty with consigning Humphries'  tiny contribution   to the world of art  to the dustbin.
Therefore your argument is fallacious.

Even if you use a more realistic example , say Michael Jackson  .
If a person really liked MJ's music but believed him guilty of child sex abuse, did it affect that person's  relationship to his music?
However, even with that more realistic example, Jackson's contribution to the world of music and art is by an infinite factor, much greater than Humphries'. so I might well make an exception and still hold MJs music in high esteem, just as I might  Mozart's music.
 I don't have that much of a relationship with Humphries' work, in the scheme of things it made a very small contribution to art and culture in society,  it's in the past and I can just forget about it without missing a heartbeat.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2017, 09:36:17 PM by Main Street »