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Non GAA Discussion => General discussion => Topic started by: Jim Bob on February 25, 2018, 05:31:43 PM

Title: DIY thread
Post by: Jim Bob on February 25, 2018, 05:31:43 PM
Doesnít appear to be a thread where we can get help from each other for DIY around the house. So I thought Iíd start this one off as im sure most of us would have some interest .........
My question is in relation to the following. I have an outdoor water tap and I wish to run a 20 mm blue water pipe from it to run underground. Is there an adapter that I can use so that I can continue to use a garden hose from the tap as well. Been searching online but no luck
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: J70 on February 25, 2018, 05:45:45 PM
Doesnít appear to be a thread where we can get help from each other for DIY around the house. So I thought Iíd start this one off as im sure most of us would have some interest .........
My question is in relation to the following. I have an outdoor water tap and I wish to run a 20 mm blue water pipe from it to run underground. Is there an adapter that I can use so that I can continue to use a garden hose from the tap as well. Been searching online but no luck

Like this?




https://www.amazon.com/dp/B018Q3AQ4W/ref=asc_df_B018Q3AQ4W5383559/?tag=hyprod-20&creative=395033&creativeASIN=B018Q3AQ4W&linkCode=df0&hvadid=193139379506&hvpos=1o3&hvnetw=g&hvrand=4366730405838371258&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9004402&hvtargid=pla-311013955890 (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B018Q3AQ4W/ref=asc_df_B018Q3AQ4W5383559/?tag=hyprod-20&creative=395033&creativeASIN=B018Q3AQ4W&linkCode=df0&hvadid=193139379506&hvpos=1o3&hvnetw=g&hvrand=4366730405838371258&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9004402&hvtargid=pla-311013955890)

If so, you should be able to get one at your local hardware shop or DIY place.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Jim Bob on February 25, 2018, 07:03:38 PM
No. That is for 2 garden hoses. The 20mm water pipe is a different size from the garden hose.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: laoislad on February 25, 2018, 07:20:36 PM
Can you see or access  the feed pipe going to the tap? If so then something like this would work.
Just cut existing pipe and join it with that and you have an outlet for your new pipe.

Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: BennyCake on August 30, 2018, 11:42:52 PM
Not sure this is ideal for the DIY thread.

Anyway, need to replace door posts on a garden shed. It's an old tin shed and its leaning slightly to one side, meaning the current door and posts are leaning too (well, pretty much the whole shed is).

Should I fit the new posts perfectly upright and hang the door straight, or just go with the lean? Thought maybe if upright it may put pressure on the new posts. Any thoughts?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Main Street on August 31, 2018, 08:53:24 AM
After reading BennyCakes's post,  a garden shed picture thread might have some interesting entries.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: illdecide on August 31, 2018, 10:50:09 AM
Not sure this is ideal for the DIY thread.

Anyway, need to replace door posts on a garden shed. It's an old tin shed and its leaning slightly to one side, meaning the current door and posts are leaning too (well, pretty much the whole shed is).

Should I fit the new posts perfectly upright and hang the door straight, or just go with the lean? Thought maybe if upright it may put pressure on the new posts. Any thoughts?

Put posts in and plumb up your shed by propping up the corners that need it, then you'll have a nice straight door and shed
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: BennyCake on August 31, 2018, 01:03:30 PM
Not sure this is ideal for the DIY thread.

Anyway, need to replace door posts on a garden shed. It's an old tin shed and its leaning slightly to one side, meaning the current door and posts are leaning too (well, pretty much the whole shed is).

Should I fit the new posts perfectly upright and hang the door straight, or just go with the lean? Thought maybe if upright it may put pressure on the new posts. Any thoughts?

Put posts in and plumb up your shed by propping up the corners that need it, then you'll have a nice straight door and shed

I see. Best way to prop up these posts?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Owen Brannigan on August 31, 2018, 08:26:09 PM
When you say a 'tin shed' what do you mean?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: BennyCake on August 31, 2018, 09:48:09 PM
When you say a 'tin shed' what do you mean?

Corrugated, roof and sides.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Owen Brannigan on September 01, 2018, 10:37:53 PM
I would say you should attempt to square up the shed before replace the door posts. You could do this with a rachet strap and then brace each end to hold the shed back on being plumb.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Mhic Easmuint on November 19, 2018, 10:09:05 AM
I have a gap in a set of french doors near the bottom where there is a draft comes in on Windy nights. See pics of the gap and any places i think it can be adjusted.
Can it be easily sorted or something i would need to contact the manufacturer about.


 (https://ibb.co/gpxTaL)

 (https://ibb.co/gxSi9f)

 (https://ibb.co/dnrX20)
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Dire Ear on November 19, 2018, 11:45:54 AM
Probably could be adjusted but I would check with the manfacturers first; as a small adjustment the wrong way could make it worse
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Milltown Row2 on November 19, 2018, 12:01:27 PM
Looks like someone tried to break in !
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: illdecide on November 19, 2018, 02:05:08 PM
Check the warranty and see if you can have them sorted through that, I've a set of French doors that have warped over the years, my neighbour fits these doors and windows and he has adjusted my doors to their max and i still have that twist on the doors (the only way i can fix it is to replace them)
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Owen Brannigan on November 19, 2018, 02:31:27 PM
Have the same problem but mine are wood doors.  it's a twist or warp.  You could use draught excluder strip from Homebase to seal the gap when the doors are closed as a quick and cheap solution.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: BennyCake on November 29, 2018, 11:47:17 AM
have a washing machine pipe coming out of wall, but the hole hasnít been properly sealed with plaster. Iím assuming a plaster mix is the way to go. But Just wondered about making the appropriate plaster mix, also if thereís a difference in plaster mix for inside and outside work?

Have sand and plaster mix ready, but not sure if plaster is suitable.

Any help welcome.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: north_antrim_hound on November 29, 2018, 12:02:27 PM
have a washing machine pipe coming out of wall, but the hole hasnít been properly sealed with plaster. Iím assuming a plaster mix is the way to go. But Just wondered about making the appropriate plaster mix, also if thereís a difference in plaster mix for inside and outside work?

Have sand and plaster mix ready, but not sure if plaster is suitable.

Any help welcome.

How big is the hole in relation to the pipe
I would say any good quality external masonry filler would do fine. Itís easier to mix as you just add water.  Toupret is a good product.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Dire Ear on November 29, 2018, 12:05:34 PM
Expanding foam?
https://www.thebalancesmb.com/what-is-considered-cold-weather-masonry-845028
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: BennyCake on November 29, 2018, 12:20:11 PM
have a washing machine pipe coming out of wall, but the hole hasnít been properly sealed with plaster. Iím assuming a plaster mix is the way to go. But Just wondered about making the appropriate plaster mix, also if thereís a difference in plaster mix for inside and outside work?

Have sand and plaster mix ready, but not sure if plaster is suitable.

Any help welcome.

How big is the hole in relation to the pipe
I would say any good quality external masonry filler would do fine. Itís easier to mix as you just add water.  Toupret is a good product.

About an inch all around the pipe.

Iíve actually just discovered I have a bag of Rapid setting sand and cement mix. I think that ought to do it?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Owen Brannigan on November 29, 2018, 10:20:43 PM
With that size of hole around the pipe you definitely need sand and cement mortar on the outside.  However, rapid set will make it hard to handle and finish. Might be best to get some ordinary mortar mix to fill the hole but fix the waste pipe on the outside to prevent movement until the mortar is set. Do the inside after the outside is set again with mortar but leave it slightly below the surface to allow you to finish it off with filler that can be smoothed off.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: east down gael on November 29, 2018, 11:53:05 PM
Just get a small tub of fire cement from a plumbing suppliers.cost you about a fiver.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: trueblue1234 on January 13, 2019, 09:03:58 PM
Was looking to put in a sensor light above the front door. Any advise? Anyone tried one of the solar ones? Are they much use here with the lack of sunshine. Would prefer this than trying to retrofit a wired one. Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Boycey on January 13, 2019, 09:09:18 PM
Was looking to put in a sensor light above the front door. Any advise? Anyone tried one of the solar ones? Are they much use here with  ;Dthe lack of sunshine. Would prefer this than trying to retrofit a wired one. Thanks in advance.

My neighbour put one at the side of his house recently, it lights the whole neighbourhood if a fly moves within a 100 yard radius.  ;D

No use to you mind.   
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Hardy on January 14, 2019, 12:43:36 PM
Was looking to put in a sensor light above the front door. Any advise? Anyone tried one of the solar ones? Are they much use here with the lack of sunshine. Would prefer this than trying to retrofit a wired one. Thanks in advance.

I have a couple of the solar ones. They haven't been able to charge on a number of occasions in the last six weeks because of the dull weather. They're grand when they work!
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: trueblue1234 on January 14, 2019, 02:03:27 PM
Was looking to put in a sensor light above the front door. Any advise? Anyone tried one of the solar ones? Are they much use here with the lack of sunshine. Would prefer this than trying to retrofit a wired one. Thanks in advance.

I have a couple of the solar ones. They haven't been able to charge on a number of occasions in the last six weeks because of the dull weather. They're grand when they work!

Yeah that was my fear. Might have a quick google around but really want to avoid having to wire one in if possible.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: laoislad on January 14, 2019, 03:30:42 PM
Was looking to put in a sensor light above the front door. Any advise? Anyone tried one of the solar ones? Are they much use here with the lack of sunshine. Would prefer this than trying to retrofit a wired one. Thanks in advance.

I have a couple of the solar ones. They haven't been able to charge on a number of occasions in the last six weeks because of the dull weather. They're grand when they work!

Yeah that was my fear. Might have a quick google around but really want to avoid having to wire one in if possible.
Wiring one would be the best way imo, but if you really don't want to have to do that then B&Q sell a battery powered range of sensor lights. Like this for example.

https://www.diy.com/departments/b-q-lethe-black-1w-battery-powered-external-pir-security-light/1138616_BQ.prd


Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: trueblue1234 on January 14, 2019, 04:38:22 PM
Was looking to put in a sensor light above the front door. Any advise? Anyone tried one of the solar ones? Are they much use here with the lack of sunshine. Would prefer this than trying to retrofit a wired one. Thanks in advance.

I have a couple of the solar ones. They haven't been able to charge on a number of occasions in the last six weeks because of the dull weather. They're grand when they work!

Yeah that was my fear. Might have a quick google around but really want to avoid having to wire one in if possible.
Wiring one would be the best way imo, but if you really don't want to have to do that then B&Q sell a battery powered range of sensor lights. Like this for example.

https://www.diy.com/departments/b-q-lethe-black-1w-battery-powered-external-pir-security-light/1138616_BQ.prd

Cheers LL. It's on a stonework porch and I'm assuming it would have to run over the stonework from existing exterior light to the sensor/ light? Trying to avoid the wires. Alternatively is there any way to wire in sensor to existing lights? (Apologies for my lack of electrical knowledge)

EDIT** Should have said without changing the type of lights (They're up down lights and the sunroom has the same matching lights so don't want to have to change them all)
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: laoislad on January 14, 2019, 05:25:19 PM
Yeah you can buy a PIR.(Passive Infrared Sensor) you can wire them to any light,but the existing lights you have don't sound like they would be great security lights, they don't really flood the area with light do they?
Also are they not the type of light you'd have turned on anyway?   
If you want a light for security or to light up a drive way when you come in how about putting one up high near the fascia. It be easy enough get a feed from the attic.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Mhic Easmuint on January 28, 2019, 09:45:43 AM
Any Plumbers?
Had 2 toilets recently started filling very slowly when flushed. Searched online and found it was a washer type thing like the pic below and i replaced it on both toilets.



When replaced both toilets fill as normal now - but one of them keep's filling and overflowing into the bowl - this runs for about 10 minutes before it would stop.
Video of overflow here - https://youtu.be/xkhV0MlZ5CE

What is the cause of this? Some fault in the device on the right?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Hereiam on January 28, 2019, 10:00:16 AM
Lads
Im looking for outside lights that i can fit on the corners of the walls. The two most popular ones that are out there are not that great. Im looking for something modern/contemporary.
Anyone come across anything.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Over the Bar on January 28, 2019, 10:18:20 AM
Your ball-c**k is possibly set too high as it knocks off the inlet once the water reaches a certain level.   There should be a plastic threaded bolt at the ball-c**k hinge that allows to to set how can much water to come into the cistern.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Mhic Easmuint on January 28, 2019, 10:52:56 AM
Your ball-c**k is possibly set too high as it knocks off the inlet once the water reaches a certain level.   There should be a plastic threaded bolt at the ball-c**k hinge that allows to to set how can much water to come into the cistern.
As soon as i touched that thread at the right the water started coming in again without it flushing.



I screwed it well down and flushed and can see it clearly go and and then raise up as the water fills up - but the water just keeps filling even when it goes as high as it can go.
Is that unit faulty?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: illdecide on January 28, 2019, 09:41:23 PM
Yip, replace it...cheap as chips £15 - £20
Should just clip in and out easily enough
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Mhic Easmuint on January 28, 2019, 11:22:19 PM
Yip, replace it...cheap as chips £15 - £20
Should just clip in and out easily enough
It should clip off near the top somewhere?
Not whole unit/pipe to bottom of cistern?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: east down gael on January 28, 2019, 11:54:21 PM
Youíd want to be careful doing that,unless youíre handy enough.if youíre lucky there will be an isolation valve on the cold feed to the toilet.close this,using a flat head screwdriver.flush the toilet and make sure itís not filling.if you donít have an isolation valve at the toilet,you can isolate it at the tank if thatís the system you have.or shut the stopcock if itís mains fed.once you have the cold feed isolated,disconnect cold feed and replace the float valve.iíd recommend a fluid master with brass threads.
  P.s if you are isolating the cold feed from the tank then be careful with the valve.sometimes if they are old they can either shut but not open,or not shut at all.good luck with it.otherwise itís probably a £50 job for a plumber.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Over the Bar on January 28, 2019, 11:56:42 PM
Your ball-c**k is possibly set too high as it knocks off the inlet once the water reaches a certain level.   There should be a plastic threaded bolt at the ball-c**k hinge that allows to to set how can much water to come into the cistern.
As soon as i touched that thread at the right the water started coming in again without it flushing.



I screwed it well down and flushed and can see it clearly go and and then raise up as the water fills up - but the water just keeps filling even when it goes as high as it can go.
Is that unit faulty?

Have you tried screwing it in the opposite direction?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Mhic Easmuint on January 29, 2019, 05:59:43 AM
Your ball-c**k is possibly set too high as it knocks off the inlet once the water reaches a certain level.   There should be a plastic threaded bolt at the ball-c**k hinge that allows to to set how can much water to come into the cistern.
As soon as i touched that thread at the right the water started coming in again without it flushing.



I screwed it well down and flushed and can see it clearly go and and then raise up as the water fills up - but the water just keeps filling even when it goes as high as it can go.
Is that unit faulty?

Have you tried screwing it in the opposite direction?

Yep tried it at max both ways and the water just kept flowing.
What is that unit called? A fill valve?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Over the Bar on January 29, 2019, 07:26:24 PM
Your ball-c**k is possibly set too high as it knocks off the inlet once the water reaches a certain level.   There should be a plastic threaded bolt at the ball-c**k hinge that allows to to set how can much water to come into the cistern.
As soon as i touched that thread at the right the water started coming in again without it flushing.



I screwed it well down and flushed and can see it clearly go and and then raise up as the water fills up - but the water just keeps filling even when it goes as high as it can go.
Is that unit faulty?

Have you tried screwing it in the opposite direction?

Yep tried it at max both ways and the water just kept flowing.
What is that unit called? A fill valve?

flush valve is what we'd call it.  Show the pic in your plumbers merchants and they should be able to sort you
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: belfastkev on January 30, 2019, 01:33:24 AM
Your ball-c**k is possibly set too high as it knocks off the inlet once the water reaches a certain level.   There should be a plastic threaded bolt at the ball-c**k hinge that allows to to set how can much water to come into the cistern.
As soon as i touched that thread at the right the water started coming in again without it flushing.



I screwed it well down and flushed and can see it clearly go and and then raise up as the water fills up - but the water just keeps filling even when it goes as high as it can go.
Is that unit faulty?

Have you tried screwing it in the opposite direction?

Yep tried it at max both ways and the water just kept flowing.
What is that unit called? A fill valve?

flush valve is what we'd call it.  Show the pic in your plumbers merchants and they should be able to sort you

It's a fill valve. The flush valve is the siphon. Looks like a bottom entry fill valve to me.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Mhic Easmuint on January 30, 2019, 12:54:38 PM
Your ball-c**k is possibly set too high as it knocks off the inlet once the water reaches a certain level.   There should be a plastic threaded bolt at the ball-c**k hinge that allows to to set how can much water to come into the cistern.
As soon as i touched that thread at the right the water started coming in again without it flushing.



I screwed it well down and flushed and can see it clearly go and and then raise up as the water fills up - but the water just keeps filling even when it goes as high as it can go.
Is that unit faulty?

Have you tried screwing it in the opposite direction?

Yep tried it at max both ways and the water just kept flowing.
What is that unit called? A fill valve?

flush valve is what we'd call it.  Show the pic in your plumbers merchants and they should be able to sort you

It's a fill valve. The flush valve is the siphon. Looks like a bottom entry fill valve to me.
I have another one here in house. Extra toilet delivered when building and never collected again.
Is it an easy swap? Clip on/off or does it require something more major?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: take_yer_points on February 25, 2019, 10:26:43 PM
I'm recently into a new house and am planning a new lawn lads.

Top soil was brought in around mid November. I've weeded over the last 2 weekends, raked the soil to level it out, removed any big stones, etc...

I've fertiliser and seed bought and sitting here in the house and am half thinking about getting the seed sown this weekend. Am I a few weeks too early? Anyone any experience of this?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: thebuzz on February 25, 2019, 10:46:07 PM
I'm recently into a new house and am planning a new lawn lads.

Top soil was brought in around mid November. I've weeded over the last 2 weekends, raked the soil to level it out, removed any big stones, etc...

I've fertiliser and seed bought and sitting here in the house and am half thinking about getting the seed sown this weekend. Am I a few weeks too early? Anyone any experience of this?

Apparently it's best to wait until late March at least. Even though it's very mild at the moment hard frost could kick in again any time before then.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Hereiam on February 26, 2019, 12:12:53 AM
Let it sit lad. Frost will destroy it. Your best bet will be April but with the way the weather is you are never sure
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: balladmaker on February 26, 2019, 12:26:52 AM
Anyone have experience relating to what looks like a black heat or scorch mark above thermostats?  Noticed a black mark above top left corner of heating stat this evening.  When I checked the other stats, the same mark was there on the wall as well above each of the stats.  Strangely enough, we had a breaker trip last night for no apparent reason at the time, so wondering if this relates to these black marks above each thermostat.  Anyone seen or heard about this before?  Thanks.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: TabClear on February 26, 2019, 07:55:06 AM
Anyone have experience relating to what looks like a black heat or scorch mark above thermostats?  Noticed a black mark above top left corner of heating stat this evening.  When I checked the other stats, the same mark was there on the wall as well above each of the stats.  Strangely enough, we had a breaker trip last night for no apparent reason at the time, so wondering if this relates to these black marks above each thermostat.  Anyone seen or heard about this before?  Thanks.

Dont know anything specifically on what you described  L(aoislad is probably your man on the electrics) but to be honest something like that I would be getting it checked straight away. Any evidence of  heat where it  shouldnt be is too big a risk.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: take_yer_points on February 28, 2019, 07:02:22 AM
I'm recently into a new house and am planning a new lawn lads.

Top soil was brought in around mid November. I've weeded over the last 2 weekends, raked the soil to level it out, removed any big stones, etc...

I've fertiliser and seed bought and sitting here in the house and am half thinking about getting the seed sown this weekend. Am I a few weeks too early? Anyone any experience of this?

Apparently it's best to wait until late March at least. Even though it's very mild at the moment hard frost could kick in again any time before then.

Cheers lads, I'll leave it a few weeks
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: LeoMc on February 28, 2019, 09:27:29 AM
I'm recently into a new house and am planning a new lawn lads.

Top soil was brought in around mid November. I've weeded over the last 2 weekends, raked the soil to level it out, removed any big stones, etc...

I've fertiliser and seed bought and sitting here in the house and am half thinking about getting the seed sown this weekend. Am I a few weeks too early? Anyone any experience of this?

Apparently it's best to wait until late March at least. Even though it's very mild at the moment hard frost could kick in again any time before then.

Cheers lads, I'll leave it a few weeks

That will give you another chance to weed again prior to sowing.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: trueblue1234 on February 28, 2019, 02:17:33 PM
I'm recently into a new house and am planning a new lawn lads.

Top soil was brought in around mid November. I've weeded over the last 2 weekends, raked the soil to level it out, removed any big stones, etc...

I've fertiliser and seed bought and sitting here in the house and am half thinking about getting the seed sown this weekend. Am I a few weeks too early? Anyone any experience of this?

Apparently it's best to wait until late March at least. Even though it's very mild at the moment hard frost could kick in again any time before then.

Cheers lads, I'll leave it a few weeks

That will give you another chance to weed again prior to sowing.

Leave it a few weeks, then spray the ground to kill of any weeds that should have started to show. Give it another 2 weeks then sow it out. Keep it well feed. 3-4 times a year and you should avoid weeds/ moss getting a hold.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: take_yer_points on February 28, 2019, 08:39:08 PM
I'm recently into a new house and am planning a new lawn lads.

Top soil was brought in around mid November. I've weeded over the last 2 weekends, raked the soil to level it out, removed any big stones, etc...

I've fertiliser and seed bought and sitting here in the house and am half thinking about getting the seed sown this weekend. Am I a few weeks too early? Anyone any experience of this?

Apparently it's best to wait until late March at least. Even though it's very mild at the moment hard frost could kick in again any time before then.

Cheers lads, I'll leave it a few weeks

That will give you another chance to weed again prior to sowing.

Even the thought of it!! I've a path to get sorted so that'll keep me busy for a couple of weeks
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: andoireabu on August 31, 2019, 06:35:20 PM
Trying to sort a dripping tap in the kitchen. It is a mixer tap so going to try and replace both washers first. There is a cutoff for the cold feed under the sink but there isn't one for the hot side. Looking at the cylinder in the hotpress there are three pipes coming out of it - one at the bottom I believe is the cold feed in, one in the middle of the tank and one coming out the top which I believe is the hot feed out to the sinks in the house.  This pipe goes to a T shaped junction that has a red gate valve on one branch of the junction but not the other. I'm thinking if I close this off then that should do it and I can drain the tap and change the washers. There are a load of other gate vales in the hot press but as nothing is labelled it is hard to know. Any ideas if I am on the right track?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: east down gael on August 31, 2019, 08:22:24 PM
Go up to the cold water storage tank and you will see two valves t the bottom.one is cold feed to your cylinder,one is cold to bathroom outlets.shut both,run hot tap at kitchen,once it has stopped running you can change washers.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Ambrose on August 31, 2019, 10:26:26 PM
If it's a mixer tap the cartridge will likely need changing.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: BennyCake on October 14, 2019, 05:55:01 PM
Seems like as good a place as any to post this...

Been smelling heating oil in the back porch of the house lately. No smells/leaks from the boiler/tank, and no smells outside or anywhere else in the house.

Lasted a few days last week, disappeared for a few days, but returned yesterday.

Neighbour on one side experiencing similar, but not on the other side.

Any ideas?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: illdecide on October 14, 2019, 11:54:03 PM
Seems like as good a place as any to post this...

Been smelling heating oil in the back porch of the house lately. No smells/leaks from the boiler/tank, and no smells outside or anywhere else in the house.

Lasted a few days last week, disappeared for a few days, but returned yesterday.

Neighbour on one side experiencing similar, but not on the other side.

Any ideas?

One tea spoon of Kerosene will stink the place out, very strong odour. Get some blue roll and take a peice and check all joints at the oil tank and at the boiler including the metal like fuel flexi hoses (could be one or two depending if you have a Tiger Loop on) check joints and run the blue towel along the flexi hoses too as they can get kinked and leak. If you find nothing you must get your neighbour to do the same, if this comes up negative you'll have to check soil in gardens etc first by smell then by touch. Could also be something loose at the burner...just keep checking and making sure everything is tight (but not Farmer tight)
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: BennyCake on October 15, 2019, 03:23:04 PM
Seems like as good a place as any to post this...

Been smelling heating oil in the back porch of the house lately. No smells/leaks from the boiler/tank, and no smells outside or anywhere else in the house.

Lasted a few days last week, disappeared for a few days, but returned yesterday.

Neighbour on one side experiencing similar, but not on the other side.

Any ideas?

One tea spoon of Kerosene will stink the place out, very strong odour. Get some blue roll and take a peice and check all joints at the oil tank and at the boiler including the metal like fuel flexi hoses (could be one or two depending if you have a Tiger Loop on) check joints and run the blue towel along the flexi hoses too as they can get kinked and leak. If you find nothing you must get your neighbour to do the same, if this comes up negative you'll have to check soil in gardens etc first by smell then by touch. Could also be something loose at the burner...just keep checking and making sure everything is tight (but not Farmer tight)

Will do, thanks.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: MoChara on January 02, 2020, 01:53:42 PM
I have an old shed with a corrugated steel roof, was thinking of converting it to a gym but it could be freezing in the winter, anyone any idea a cheap way to insultate it? can you spray foam insulation straight onto it, not too worried about how pretty it ends up
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Milltown Row2 on January 02, 2020, 08:17:24 PM
I have an old shed with a corrugated steel roof, was thinking of converting it to a gym but it could be freezing in the winter, anyone any idea a cheap way to insultate it? can you spray foam insulation straight onto it, not too worried about how pretty it ends up

Panel the roof with some wood,  Use the spray foam insulation and cover with a few sheets of plywood, then nailed to the frame! Perfect
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Jim Bob on January 03, 2020, 08:24:09 AM
Anyone got a good leaf vacuum for the garden ?  Back breaking stuff shovelling leaves into brown bin. Need something handier at my time of day.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: under the bar on January 03, 2020, 10:26:18 AM
Anyone got a good leaf vacuum for the garden ?  Back breaking stuff shovelling leaves into brown bin. Need something handier at my time of day.

Iíve had a few of them Jim and I have trees everywhere!   Found the black n decker best of the blow/vac but when it eventually packed in I settled on a petrol blower and two of the big plastic Ďhandsí out of Home Bargains to lift them.  Much quicker in the long run than blow/vac/mulch and better exercise with a manageable bit of stooping.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: thebuzz on January 03, 2020, 02:09:41 PM
Anyone got a good leaf vacuum for the garden ?  Back breaking stuff shovelling leaves into brown bin. Need something handier at my time of day.

Iíve had a few of them Jim and I have trees everywhere!   Found the black n decker best of the blow/vac but when it eventually packed in I settled on a petrol blower and two of the big plastic Ďhandsí out of Home Bargains to lift them.  Much quicker in the long run than blow/vac/mulch and better exercise with a manageable bit of stooping.

If they're the plastic hands I'm thinking of they're a great job for lifting a good pile of leaves.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: MoChara on January 03, 2020, 02:19:41 PM
I have an old shed with a corrugated steel roof, was thinking of converting it to a gym but it could be freezing in the winter, anyone any idea a cheap way to insultate it? can you spray foam insulation straight onto it, not too worried about how pretty it ends up

Panel the roof with some wood,  Use the spray foam insulation and cover with a few sheets of plywood, then nailed to the frame! Perfect

Cheers, I was gonna cheap skate it and Foam insulate the underside of the tin and then panel it saving a layer of boards, but might just have to do it that way.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Milltown Row2 on January 03, 2020, 02:40:25 PM
I have an old shed with a corrugated steel roof, was thinking of converting it to a gym but it could be freezing in the winter, anyone any idea a cheap way to insultate it? can you spray foam insulation straight onto it, not too worried about how pretty it ends up

Panel the roof with some wood,  Use the spray foam insulation and cover with a few sheets of plywood, then nailed to the frame! Perfect

Cheers, I was gonna cheap skate it and Foam insulate the underside of the tin and then panel it saving a layer of boards, but might just have to do it that way.

Would love to have the freedom/time to try that, but can't be arsed! I've a vison of all the things I want to do or try and nearly got my wife to buy me a whole new set of tools/equipment for doing the DIY stuff but didn't bother!

I could make time but I'm the type that once you start something I'm trying to finish it in a day!!!!!!
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: BennyCake on June 16, 2020, 09:17:47 PM
Have to fix up an old shed, and was needing guttering.

Was going to go for metal/aluminium guttering as it should last a lot longer. Just wondered what sort of price youíd be talking?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: bigfrank on November 04, 2020, 09:20:54 PM
Trying to sort a garden shed for the house,itís gonna me made out of box section and metal cladding sheets or something.first part of the project is forming a concrete base,should I make it the exact size of the sheds frame so the cladding panels go down past the concrete base or should I make the base say a 150mm approx bigger right around the shed or does it matter?? Any doí and donts I should consider??

For concrete base Iím thinking take off grass sods,dig down maybe 150mm,whacker place in 75mm of gravel/stone and then use a 4x2 timber frame levelled and filled with concrete as my base on top?? Bolt shed down to that
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: johnnycool on November 05, 2020, 11:47:26 AM
Trying to sort a garden shed for the house,itís gonna me made out of box section and metal cladding sheets or something.first part of the project is forming a concrete base,should I make it the exact size of the sheds frame so the cladding panels go down past the concrete base or should I make the base say a 150mm approx bigger right around the shed or does it matter?? Any doí and donts I should consider??

For concrete base Iím thinking take off grass sods,dig down maybe 150mm,whacker place in 75mm of gravel/stone and then use a 4x2 timber frame levelled and filled with concrete as my base on top?? Bolt shed down to that

Are you putting a lorry in it?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: bigfrank on November 05, 2020, 01:12:20 PM
No few bags of coal/logs, tools and a work bench kinda area just for doing odd jobs,thinking a 10 foot x 10 foot shed or something along that line. I assume your question was a dig at my method lol??
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Emmett on March 01, 2021, 08:31:29 PM
Would any of you fine folk be able to offer me some advice please? I am replacing a shower enclosure and have the 2 slide doors removed. However the 2 sides (frames) which are mounted to tiles are not budging. Screws removed and Stanley knife slid through the silicone on both sides. Despite this they are as solid as before I started to work on them, almost as if they are glued down the centre. I'm afraid of cracking the tiles.....help  :o
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Milltown Row2 on March 01, 2021, 08:32:38 PM
Would any of you fine folk be able to offer me some advice please? I am replacing a shower enclosure and have the 2 slide doors removed. However the 2 sides which are mounted to tiles are not budging. Screws removed and Stanley knife slid through the silicone on both sides. Despite this they are as solid as before I started to work on them, almost as if they are glued down the centre. I'm afraid of cracking the tiles.....help  :o

DW40, try that
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: majestic on March 01, 2021, 09:13:27 PM
Anyone got recommendations for dealing with mould on a garden shed roof. Im positive its not leaking, I think the moisture was in the wood at the time of building. I've seen anti mould paint, should I just go ahead and give the roof a coat or would there be anything else needed before this?

Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: JoG2 on March 01, 2021, 09:23:26 PM
Anyone got recommendations for dealing with mould on a garden shed roof. Im positive its not leaking, I think the moisture was in the wood at the time of building. I've seen anti mould paint, should I just go ahead and give the roof a coat or would there be anything else needed before this?

Roof or celing majestic? I've used anti mould paint on a shed ceiling (hardwood) before, good job. Haven't had to reapply in over a year
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Emmett on March 01, 2021, 09:33:35 PM
Would any of you fine folk be able to offer me some advice please? I am replacing a shower enclosure and have the 2 slide doors removed. However the 2 sides which are mounted to tiles are not budging. Screws removed and Stanley knife slid through the silicone on both sides. Despite this they are as solid as before I started to work on them, almost as if they are glued down the centre. I'm afraid of cracking the tiles.....help  :o

DW40, try that

Cheers MR2. Will give it a go
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Milltown Row2 on March 01, 2021, 09:59:26 PM
Would any of you fine folk be able to offer me some advice please? I am replacing a shower enclosure and have the 2 slide doors removed. However the 2 sides which are mounted to tiles are not budging. Screws removed and Stanley knife slid through the silicone on both sides. Despite this they are as solid as before I started to work on them, almost as if they are glued down the centre. I'm afraid of cracking the tiles.....help  :o

DW40, try that

Cheers MR2. Will give it a go

Re done both shower units during lockdown, a mate whoís into his DIY swears by it, lifted stuff off easily enough, let it soak in and see if it moves it.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: east down gael on March 01, 2021, 10:53:54 PM
Itíll likely be the profiles have silicone ran up the back of them. Very difficult to remove the profiles without damaging the tiles if this is the case. You could try getting a wire in between the profile and the tile.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: majestic on March 02, 2021, 08:53:49 AM
Anyone got recommendations for dealing with mould on a garden shed roof. Im positive its not leaking, I think the moisture was in the wood at the time of building. I've seen anti mould paint, should I just go ahead and give the roof a coat or would there be anything else needed before this?

Roof or celing majestic? I've used anti mould paint on a shed ceiling (hardwood) before, good job. Haven't had to reapply in over a year

Ceiling, what brand did you go for?
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: JoG2 on March 02, 2021, 10:56:32 AM
Anyone got recommendations for dealing with mould on a garden shed roof. Im positive its not leaking, I think the moisture was in the wood at the time of building. I've seen anti mould paint, should I just go ahead and give the roof a coat or would there be anything else needed before this?

Roof or celing majestic? I've used anti mould paint on a shed ceiling (hardwood) before, good job. Haven't had to reapply in over a year

Ceiling, what brand did you go for?

https://www.rawlinspaints.com/home/exterior-masonry-paints/368-rust-oleum-mathys-murfill-renovation-paint.html

This is what I used, on the recommendation of a builder. Says exterior, but worked a treat, and still is.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: JoG2 on March 04, 2021, 11:22:08 AM
Anyone got recommendations for dealing with mould on a garden shed roof. Im positive its not leaking, I think the moisture was in the wood at the time of building. I've seen anti mould paint, should I just go ahead and give the roof a coat or would there be anything else needed before this?

Roof or celing majestic? I've used anti mould paint on a shed ceiling (hardwood) before, good job. Haven't had to reapply in over a year

Ceiling, what brand did you go for?

https://www.rawlinspaints.com/home/exterior-masonry-paints/368-rust-oleum-mathys-murfill-renovation-paint.html

This is what I used, on the recommendation of a builder. Says exterior, but worked a treat, and still is.

Majestic
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: gawa316 on May 15, 2022, 02:12:50 AM
Just got a new washing machine (still have the older one), the newer one has a bigger capacity and after the first wash the waste water couldn't get away quick enough and pished out all over the place. Waste pipe on new washer is 1.5 in and 1in in the old one.

Any idea what can be done? Other than put the old ones back in
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Jim Bob on July 02, 2022, 07:07:58 PM
Anyone here ever hire a mini digger to do a small job even though they ve never used one before?
Just wondering are they hard to get onto ?
Thinking of going for it, hiring one and mess about with the controls , get the  hang of it and get the small job done by the end of the day Ö
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Nanderson on July 02, 2022, 07:17:37 PM
Anyone here ever hire a mini digger to do a small job even though they ve never used one before?
Just wondering are they hard to get onto ?
Thinking of going for it, hiring one and mess about with the controls , get the  hang of it and get the small job done by the end of the day Ö
Once you've been on it for 10 mins you'll be flying.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: Turf on July 02, 2022, 07:21:37 PM
Anyone here ever hire a mini digger to do a small job even though they ve never used one before?
Just wondering are they hard to get onto ?
Thinking of going for it, hiring one and mess about with the controls , get the  hang of it and get the small job done by the end of the day Ö
Piece of piss.
Title: Re: DIY thread
Post by: armaghniac on July 02, 2022, 08:17:54 PM
Anyone here ever hire a mini digger to do a small job even though they ve never used one before?
Just wondering are they hard to get onto ?
Thinking of going for it, hiring one and mess about with the controls , get the  hang of it and get the small job done by the end of the day Ö
Once you've been on it for 10 mins you'll be flying.

What width are they? THinking of a semi-D with a gate at right angles to the alley between the houses.