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Messages - Billys Boots

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1
General discussion / Re: The WINE thread
« on: Today at 09:37:13 AM »
I think it is good to try various grapes and see what works. Experimenting with wine from different countries is worth it.
Also Bordeaux and Burgundy are quite different.
I am a big Cotes du Rhône fan but prob only because of holidays in the east of France. I have no idea of how it is considered (in general) by wine buffs. Any wisdom?

Partial to Cotes de Rhones myself in the past few years.  I am not so fond of Chateauneuf de Pape and Crozes Hermitage, but like Vacqueryas and Gigondas.  If you like the Australian/US Shiraz grape, you'll probably like these.  Vacqueryas and Gigondas can be seriously expensive here, but SuperValu sell them for €12-15/bottle on special from time-to-time - normal retail price is €27-30. 

2
Longford / Re: Longford Football (& Hurling) Thread
« on: October 15, 2018, 08:58:17 AM »
Fair play to the half-parish, should have the experience and nous for a good stab at a provincial title now, you'd think.

3
Longford / Re: Longford Football (& Hurling) Thread
« on: October 08, 2018, 09:18:20 AM »
Quote
As a final note it's madness having the showpiece of the year in Oct - no reason why the county final cannot be in September.

Logical example of why September isn't the same as October.  And why the AI club championship is a competition of endurance rather than skill. 

4
Longford / Re: Longford Football (& Hurling) Thread
« on: October 05, 2018, 11:09:02 AM »
Good luck on Sunday, Laureleye. 

5
Longford / Re: Longford Football (& Hurling) Thread
« on: October 02, 2018, 09:32:41 AM »
Lovely to see the famous Mostrim Martello Tower in its rightful place, front and centre.  Congrats (mumble, mumble). 

6
General discussion / Re: The Super(ish) Leeds United Thread
« on: October 01, 2018, 03:00:30 PM »
8 bloody 'derbies' this season - not healthy for any side, but good for the bank balance, I suppose.

7
General discussion / Re: The Super(ish) Leeds United Thread
« on: September 19, 2018, 09:41:46 AM »
Leeds were top this day last season also.  And then ...

8
Longford / Re: Longford Football (& Hurling) Thread
« on: September 18, 2018, 09:40:44 AM »
Boots will be disappointed with the Colmcille goalie - seeing as the glorious past there.

Clonguish v Mullinalaghta promises to be a good game.

As I said to Laureleye, it's better than another humiliation meeting the half-parish in the final. 

9
General discussion / Re: The OFFICIAL FAI Thread.....Roll on France 2016
« on: September 09, 2018, 03:27:33 PM »
Quote
Croatia is a bit of an outlier.

So is Ireland.   

Quote
I think the FAI is crap.

They are good at some things, they are bad at a lot of things.  Lots of room for improvement, for sure.

Quote
They never built their own stadium.

Don't really know what that means, or what it signifies - they share a stadium with rugby; that has to be a sustainable development.  It appears to be in constant use, for something or other.  It doesn't get into significant conflict with its neighbours. 

Quote
They still depend on the GAA every so often.

Don't know what that means either, or what it's referring to.

Quote
They missed the boat on youth development.


There's a perfectly good player development plan (PDP) in operation since 2016, and while it may take some time to mature, there is no reason to think it won't work to some degree. 

Quote
The League of Oireland is a bit of a mess.

It's not great, but it deserves better support.  It can't and shouldn't be seen as a potential 'competitor' for the giant leagues in other large countries, but its best teams should be effective opponents for leagues in similar sized countries, and they are.  making it an outstanding outlier, in your own words, would need artificial supports from its national association or the government, but neither is likely to happen.  My own view is that the PDP, which has the 'elite' youth attached to LoI clubs is interesting, and provides a good pathway at home for the development of younger players, has a good chance of working in  the next 10 years. 

Quote
And then Irish sports training is a long way from world class bar maybe Skib rowing club and certain boxing clubs

There are good coaches in several sports in Ireland, most of them are working voluntarily, and that will never work.  I think the recent provision of degree courses in sports sciences and sports methodologies have got to prove beneficial in the coming years for our athletes, in all sports. 

10
General discussion / Re: The OFFICIAL FAI Thread.....Roll on France 2016
« on: September 09, 2018, 02:42:59 PM »
So......let's get this straight, in summary

It's the GAA's fault that the Irish soccer team is shite?

It's an interesting topic for discussion, though.  The argument I have heard, but not participated in, due to a lack of definitive knowledge, is that Ireland's poor showing in all international sports (though that is somewhat of a stretch, let's keep it to athletic pursuits), is due to an obsession with a national sport, at the expense of international sports.  There is somewhat of a logic to this, we can't be good at everything/anything, if (some of) our best sports people are not playing international sports.  People point to the achievements of say, Denmark and New Zealand, internationally, as comparators.  It came up again in the performance of Croatia at the recent World Cup.  From my own personal perspective, I find it difficult to understand why some gaelic football players don't try to earn a living playing association football, and represent their country.  I mean, for an international standard athlete, there can't be much satisfaction at only being able to test yourself against the best in the parish/county/country, can there? 

I get all the stuff about representing your parish/club/community.  Let's not do that again. 

11
What about " We Don't Need Nobody Else" by Whipping Boy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L2NqJ8t02Y0

Great tune but incredibly dodgy lyrics (in today's context)

I hit you for the first time today
I didn't mean it
It just happened
You wouldn't let me go to the phone
You wanted to make love and I did not
Now I know the distance between us
Christ we weren't even fighting, I was just annoyed
Silence and you started to cry, that really hurt you said
Yeah and you thought you knew me


At the time they were critical darlings, I remember a big article in the Melody Maker praising their honesty. I don't think you would get away with writing a song from the point of a domestic abuser today. I don't know if that is an advance or not, because it is a great (but difficult) song.

I don't think they were talking about their point of view there, to me it is pretty obvious that they are portraying a pretty screwed-up person (and their particular view of their relationship) in the song.  Incidentally, they toured that album with Lou Reed in Europe, and Lou Reed thought that they (on the basis of that song) were going to become the biggest band in the world. 

12
General discussion / Re: The OFFICIAL FAI Thread.....Roll on France 2016
« on: August 22, 2018, 02:17:52 PM »
Irish Soccer is 100 years behind Gaelic games. Why? Because we oppressed it for those 100 years - well for 85 of it! There are very few soccer clubs in Mayo older than 50 years. Most were founded in the mid-70's early 80's. The GAA has had the power for most of our existence as an independent state, backed by the clergy and the state. They proverbially held the heel to the throat for as long as they could.

There is always an underlying fear among the GAA fraternity of Soccer. There always seem a need to blacken and belittle it.

If the article above was about GAA getting more help from the state, it would be seen as an entitlement and reward for all the good work that the GAA does. Of course the Soccer fraternity do equally as much within the modern community and voluntary as well.

As a Parent with feet in both camps it disgusts me to see either side belittle the other. Both at ground level are massive organisations that instill a great sense of community in my area.

I agree with most of that. There is still a subtle difference though in the GAA and the Soccer. The GAA is still about a sense of place. Soccer draws lads from all around if it's a decent club. Our club in Newport has players from Murroe, Ballina, Ballinahinch etc. They are a great club, and do great work, and I support them. But if you are talking about a sense of identity and community, I think the GAA club is still the centre.

But in my experience (until this year at least when Summer Soccer kicks in), the clubs have co-existed excellently, and complement each other. I hope it continues.

I think that's true in most communities AZ, and I wouldn't see any difference in the commitment of officials in either code (and I think most officials I know would agree).  I would say that rather than defining a place, the GAA sees itself as a cultural organisation and not confined to being a sporting organisation.  It's a master stroke in terms of acquiring finance for running costs, i don't think any other sporting organisation could successfully do that, which is probably a legacy of our history as a nation.

I don't necessarily think a GAA club defines a place as such, albeit certainly places like Ferbane, Rhode, etc, are widely associated with their GAA players/clubs. People of a certain age know nothing about Ferbane, but they know the Lowrys and Ferbane GAA.

However I think the GAA club, because of restrictions in who can play for a club, is more tightly bound to a specific area or community. If you play for Newport, you are from Newport and you are of Newport. If you play for Newport Town FC, you are affiliated with Newport Town FC, but you could be from anywhere within a 20 mile radius.

I think you can see it most often when a club reaches a final or something. In the soccer, there's great excitement in the club and there's massive celebrations in the club when they win. In the GAA, there's flags, banners, good luck messages and bonfires and the whole town or village is caught up in it.

I'm not having a go at soccer here by the way, as I said before I played with, enjoy and support  my local soccer club, and I attended a brave few Limerick FC games in Pike Rovers back in the day. I just see them as different types of animal, and the GAA is more rooted in place.

Ah, I wouldn't agree with the bit in bold at all now - it might be true of a few places, but I don't think people discriminate (and I don't mean this in a negative way) when it comes to sporting success. 

13
General discussion / Re: The Super(ish) Leeds United Thread
« on: August 22, 2018, 01:21:49 PM »
Will take a point. In contrast to other games, started off very slowly and were on the back foot for a lot of the game. Were behind twice but showed a bit of character to equalise each time. Think Cooper was a big loss. Bielsa showed he's not afraid to make a change. Philips taken off early and Roofe subbed after scoring. Bamford did well when he came on. Also like the look of young Shackleton.

I'd have been happy with a point at Swansea before the game started.  I like the cut of Potter's jib also. 

14
General discussion / Re: The OFFICIAL FAI Thread.....Roll on France 2016
« on: August 22, 2018, 01:11:56 PM »
Irish Soccer is 100 years behind Gaelic games. Why? Because we oppressed it for those 100 years - well for 85 of it! There are very few soccer clubs in Mayo older than 50 years. Most were founded in the mid-70's early 80's. The GAA has had the power for most of our existence as an independent state, backed by the clergy and the state. They proverbially held the heel to the throat for as long as they could.

There is always an underlying fear among the GAA fraternity of Soccer. There always seem a need to blacken and belittle it.

If the article above was about GAA getting more help from the state, it would be seen as an entitlement and reward for all the good work that the GAA does. Of course the Soccer fraternity do equally as much within the modern community and voluntary as well.

As a Parent with feet in both camps it disgusts me to see either side belittle the other. Both at ground level are massive organisations that instill a great sense of community in my area.

I agree with most of that. There is still a subtle difference though in the GAA and the Soccer. The GAA is still about a sense of place. Soccer draws lads from all around if it's a decent club. Our club in Newport has players from Murroe, Ballina, Ballinahinch etc. They are a great club, and do great work, and I support them. But if you are talking about a sense of identity and community, I think the GAA club is still the centre.

But in my experience (until this year at least when Summer Soccer kicks in), the clubs have co-existed excellently, and complement each other. I hope it continues.

I think that's true in most communities AZ, and I wouldn't see any difference in the commitment of officials in either code (and I think most officials I know would agree).  I would say that rather than defining a place, the GAA sees itself as a cultural organisation and not confined to being a sporting organisation.  It's a master stroke in terms of acquiring finance for running costs, i don't think any other sporting organisation could successfully do that, which is probably a legacy of our history as a nation. 

15
GAA Discussion / Re: Biggest hammerings in club championship
« on: August 21, 2018, 01:25:03 PM »
No comment.  Many thanks Laureleye.

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