Author Topic: Juvenile Coaching  (Read 4167 times)

manfromdelmonte

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Re: Juvenile Coaching
« Reply #30 on: June 23, 2017, 08:06:33 AM »
Don't worry about it

some lads will be trying to introduce blanket defences at U8 next

Not quite blanket but a sweeper at an u12 blitz the other day,  keeper came out to hit the long free kicks that were deemed scorable but then let the full back hit the kick outs!!!  Ref added 20 seconds per free kick on...I kid you not...showed me the watch after the game!!
I always let the player that was fouled take the free
stops one child taking over everything
plus gets the ball moving quicker

Would agree with this unless it's a scoring opportunity and the person is not going to score.

I coach at U10 level that wouldn't matter BCB.  We're not trying to win an All Ireland at that age, and it'll not do much for the youngster to not be allowed to kick "his" free kick.

I agree and most times they do kick their own but there is also a benefit as they hit u12s to have a 'freetaker' as come the next step up it's getting very competitive with Feile etc so if you have a couple who are stronger then let them hit some of the frees for scores.
tell them you're going to have a free taking competition in 4 weeks with a small prize for the winner. eg three/four kicks from different angles
test them on it informally - get them familiar with the format.
they will practice like mad for the few weeks. boys love competition. they need a target or a result from effort.

johnneycool

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Re: Juvenile Coaching
« Reply #31 on: June 23, 2017, 09:07:52 AM »
Don't worry about it

some lads will be trying to introduce blanket defences at U8 next

Not quite blanket but a sweeper at an u12 blitz the other day,  keeper came out to hit the long free kicks that were deemed scorable but then let the full back hit the kick outs!!!  Ref added 20 seconds per free kick on...I kid you not...showed me the watch after the game!!
I always let the player that was fouled take the free
stops one child taking over everything
plus gets the ball moving quicker

Would agree with this unless it's a scoring opportunity and the person is not going to score.

I coach at U10 level that wouldn't matter BCB.  We're not trying to win an All Ireland at that age, and it'll not do much for the youngster to not be allowed to kick "his" free kick.

It depends if the youngster in question is confident enough to take it and that's not always the case. You may be putting them under a bit of pressure to take a free, especially for a score when they're not comfortable to do so even if it is U10 or U12. I'd be inclined to have a quiet word just before it and ask them are they happy to take it and maybe take a bit of the pressure off them by telling them it doesn't really matter if they score or not but to give it a go.
The score and winning shouldn't matter to the coach, but kids being kids want to win and can put pressure on each other.


Keyser soze

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Re: Juvenile Coaching
« Reply #32 on: June 23, 2017, 09:15:17 AM »
It seems to me that left orientated sports people find it much harder to use their weaker side than right orientated.
In fact you regularly find sports people who are naturally right orientated but practice so much with their left that they become left orientated e.g. Ferenc Puskas, Morten Gamst Pedersen, Phil Mickleson. Never really hear of the other way around, except Andreas Brehme who took penalties with his right and free kicks and corners with his left, which makes me think he's naturally left legged.
Anyway all of the above practices loads with weaker side from young age.

Rafa Nadal.

AZOffaly

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Re: Juvenile Coaching
« Reply #33 on: June 23, 2017, 09:18:00 AM »
Don't worry about it

some lads will be trying to introduce blanket defences at U8 next

Not quite blanket but a sweeper at an u12 blitz the other day,  keeper came out to hit the long free kicks that were deemed scorable but then let the full back hit the kick outs!!!  Ref added 20 seconds per free kick on...I kid you not...showed me the watch after the game!!
I always let the player that was fouled take the free
stops one child taking over everything
plus gets the ball moving quicker

Would agree with this unless it's a scoring opportunity and the person is not going to score.

I coach at U10 level that wouldn't matter BCB.  We're not trying to win an All Ireland at that age, and it'll not do much for the youngster to not be allowed to kick "his" free kick.

It depends if the youngster in question is confident enough to take it and that's not always the case. You may be putting them under a bit of pressure to take a free, especially for a score when they're not comfortable to do so even if it is U10 or U12. I'd be inclined to have a quiet word just before it and ask them are they happy to take it and maybe take a bit of the pressure off them by telling them it doesn't really matter if they score or not but to give it a go.
The score and winning shouldn't matter to the coach, but kids being kids want to win and can put pressure on each other.

In my experience, nearly everyone wants to take the free. And sidelines. And 45s/65s and everything else :)

johnneycool

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Re: Juvenile Coaching
« Reply #34 on: June 23, 2017, 09:51:02 AM »
Don't worry about it

some lads will be trying to introduce blanket defences at U8 next

Not quite blanket but a sweeper at an u12 blitz the other day,  keeper came out to hit the long free kicks that were deemed scorable but then let the full back hit the kick outs!!!  Ref added 20 seconds per free kick on...I kid you not...showed me the watch after the game!!
I always let the player that was fouled take the free
stops one child taking over everything
plus gets the ball moving quicker

Would agree with this unless it's a scoring opportunity and the person is not going to score.

I coach at U10 level that wouldn't matter BCB.  We're not trying to win an All Ireland at that age, and it'll not do much for the youngster to not be allowed to kick "his" free kick.

It depends if the youngster in question is confident enough to take it and that's not always the case. You may be putting them under a bit of pressure to take a free, especially for a score when they're not comfortable to do so even if it is U10 or U12. I'd be inclined to have a quiet word just before it and ask them are they happy to take it and maybe take a bit of the pressure off them by telling them it doesn't really matter if they score or not but to give it a go.
The score and winning shouldn't matter to the coach, but kids being kids want to win and can put pressure on each other.

In my experience, nearly everyone wants to take the free. And sidelines. And 45s/65s and everything else :)

More than often that's the case, but I've also had a few youngsters maybe a bit lesser in ability standing over a free looking a bit worried and then I'd intervene. They're afraid of various things, missing the lift, a fresh air strike and so forth, but then you need to take the time at the next session to work with them on it if resources allow.

omagh_gael

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Re: Juvenile Coaching
« Reply #35 on: June 23, 2017, 10:16:40 AM »
Anybody got any wee fun drills for u6s? I'm taking my clubs u6s now and do the usual wee tag games teaching the concept of finding space, obstacle courses, toe pick ups, kicking etc. Will start teaching the concept of sledging later in the summer ;)

I'm conscious that it can be a bit repetitive for them and looking some ideas to freshen it up every now and then.

GaillimhIarthair

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Re: Juvenile Coaching
« Reply #36 on: June 23, 2017, 10:42:51 AM »
Anybody got any wee fun drills for u6s? I'm taking my clubs u6s now and do the usual wee tag games teaching the concept of finding space, obstacle courses, toe pick ups, kicking etc. Will start teaching the concept of sledging later in the summer ;)

I'm conscious that it can be a bit repetitive for them and looking some ideas to freshen it up every now and then.
Try the link below and select the football tab at the top and your age group on the left of the page and you should find any amount of games and drills in there for the kids - its a great resource

http://learning.gaa.ie/planner/


omagh_gael

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Re: Juvenile Coaching
« Reply #37 on: June 23, 2017, 11:13:36 AM »
Anybody got any wee fun drills for u6s? I'm taking my clubs u6s now and do the usual wee tag games teaching the concept of finding space, obstacle courses, toe pick ups, kicking etc. Will start teaching the concept of sledging later in the summer ;)

I'm conscious that it can be a bit repetitive for them and looking some ideas to freshen it up every now and then.
Try the link below and select the football tab at the top and your age group on the left of the page and you should find any amount of games and drills in there for the kids - its a great resource

http://learning.gaa.ie/planner/

Great stuff, that looks like an excellent resource.

Croí na hÉireann

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Re: Juvenile Coaching
« Reply #38 on: June 23, 2017, 12:09:45 PM »
Anybody got any wee fun drills for u6s? I'm taking my clubs u6s now and do the usual wee tag games teaching the concept of finding space, obstacle courses, toe pick ups, kicking etc. Will start teaching the concept of sledging later in the summer ;)

I'm conscious that it can be a bit repetitive for them and looking some ideas to freshen it up every now and then.
Try the link below and select the football tab at the top and your age group on the left of the page and you should find any amount of games and drills in there for the kids - its a great resource

http://learning.gaa.ie/planner/

We're just finishing up with u6s for the year now, goes with the school year, so been through the mill already, sounds like your just getting going. One bit of advice I would have is to move from thinking about drills to thinking about games. Go back to your own school days to see what was fun for you. We never practised kicking the ball back and forth but every break was game based whether that was everyone chasing the ball around the pitch or small sided games like 3 and in or world cup. When you start playing games with the kids you'll instantly see the enjoyment factor go way up on their behalf.

Some good football games we did this year was to start off a simple game of hand passing and tackling, no goals. They get a point for a proper hand pass and 2 for a tackle. With the tackle if you demonstrate to them that it has to be an open slap at the ball and can't be on the arms or on the body they will surprise you will their diligence. Get them all to slap the ball out of your hands to practice. The scoring usually ends in a draw as they are all too busy running around after each other to keep track.

Another one they love is cops and robbers (you'll need a load of footballs for this one). Have a square about 10m by 10m. In the four corner you have four zones, I mark them out with cones of the same colour to help distinguish them. In one corner is the cop station (blue cones) where all the cops start the game. In the opposite corner diagonally is the jail (red cones) where the cops have to gently lead the robbers when they catch them. In one of the other corners is the bank (yellow cones) where all the balls (made out of gold) are stored and in the final corner is the robbers hideout (white cones) where all the robbers start. Idea is the robbers have to rob the balls from the bnk without being caught. They have to bounce the ball while they're running with it. The cops can't leave the cop station until the robbers start taking the balls. If the cops catch the robbers they lead them gently to the jail and put the ball back in the bank. The cops can't enter the robbers hideout and take the balls back. Robbers can break other robbers out of jail by flushing the toilet (robber in jail holds their hands out and other robber pushes their hands down). Coach can flush the toilet as well until they get the hang of it. Cops can't hang outside the jail, if there's no robbers running around they have to return to the cop station. Game is over when all the balls are in the hideout or all the robbers are in the jail. Switch the cops and robbers and go again. Time won't be long going.

Another one that I'm mulling over but haven't put into practice yet is superheros and villians. Kids love fluff. The best games are the ones you come up with yourself, don't be afraid to try out your ideas, like the kids you'll only find what works once you give it a go. Can be very rewarding when you see them all getting involved. Best of luck with it.

We separated the girls out this year too as we noticed that they were on the edges of games and numbers were starting to wane. Should have done it earlier as they are thriving now.
Westmeath - Home of the Christy Ring Cup...

manfromdelmonte

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Re: Juvenile Coaching
« Reply #39 on: June 23, 2017, 12:19:51 PM »
sillier the better with young kids
don't be afraid to make an eejit of yourself

omagh_gael

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Re: Juvenile Coaching
« Reply #40 on: June 23, 2017, 10:31:43 PM »
Cheers lads, will give them a try.