Author Topic: The next recession  (Read 10237 times)

sensethetone

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #30 on: February 25, 2022, 01:02:22 PM »
We'll have to start fracking in Laythrum, Cavan and Fermanagh....

The Russians or Chinese probably have the Fracking rights.

armaghniac

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #31 on: February 25, 2022, 01:48:46 PM »
We'll have to start fracking in Laythrum, Cavan and Fermanagh....

This crisis will advance alternative energy technologies but also will cause people to reflect on being sniffy about energy sources in their own backyard, whether it be fracking or the Greens refusing to allow off shore exploration.
If at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

manfromdelmonte

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #32 on: February 25, 2022, 05:08:05 PM »
all these people building giant houses relying on electricity to run their underfloor heating could be in for a very nasty shock in the near future

Them bsatards with their efficient heating systems

Turf's yer only man  ::)
Timber
We burn our own timber mainly.  Few trees down in the last few days will keep us going for another year

Did they fall into your garden?
Up the fields.

Was asking as I donít think they belong to you (if they arenít on your fields) so are you allowed to cut them? Remember a lad I knew was given a warning by the forestry department
Yep. Our own fields.
Price of oil will make solar/electric cars more viable
« Last Edit: February 25, 2022, 05:12:32 PM by manfromdelmonte »

RadioGAAGAA

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #33 on: February 26, 2022, 01:50:35 PM »
Yep. Our own fields.
Price of oil will make solar/electric cars more viable

Will it?

~35% of electric is produced from gas fired stations.
i usse an speelchekor

armaghniac

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #34 on: February 26, 2022, 02:06:24 PM »
Yep. Our own fields.
Price of oil will make solar/electric cars more viable

Will it?

~35% of electric is produced from gas fired stations.

Yes, but if you charge your car during the night then wind has made up vast majority of generation during recent nights. During the day more gas is used when demand is higher.
If at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

RadioGAAGAA

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #35 on: February 26, 2022, 02:22:46 PM »
Yep. Our own fields.
Price of oil will make solar/electric cars more viable

Will it?

~35% of electric is produced from gas fired stations.

Yes, but if you charge your car during the night then wind has made up vast majority of generation during recent nights. During the day more gas is used when demand is higher.

Huh, didn't realise that.

I know the grid is massively undersized for coping with a significant shift to EV - but if the majority of power at night can come from non gas sources (and the gas stations can be quickly turned on/off - not always a given) then yeah, that would help.
i usse an speelchekor

armaghniac

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #36 on: February 26, 2022, 03:20:43 PM »
Yep. Our own fields.
Price of oil will make solar/electric cars more viable

Will it?

~35% of electric is produced from gas fired stations.

Yes, but if you charge your car during the night then wind has made up vast majority of generation during recent nights. During the day more gas is used when demand is higher.

Huh, didn't realise that.

Demand at 4am is about half of that at 7pm, a lot of days there is enough wind to provide that half. Of course it is not windy some days, and wasn't for much of January.
see https://www.smartgriddashboard.com/#all/wind



I know the grid is massively undersized for coping with a significant shift to EV - but if the majority of power at night can come from non gas sources (and the gas stations can be quickly turned on/off - not always a given) then yeah, that would help.
[/quote]

Again, if people charge at home then the grid can cope fine, as the car is not using more than ovens, tumble driers etc that are not typically in use at 4am. You don't need a fast charger during the night, you can charge in 2 or 3 hours, while you sleep. The ability of the grid to provide a load of rapid charging points on the road is an issue.

On an aside, if you wanted to flee Kyiv in recent days an electric car might not be ideal.
If at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

Mikhail Prokhorov

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #37 on: February 27, 2022, 12:34:33 PM »
Yep. Our own fields.
Price of oil will make solar/electric cars more viable

Will it?

~35% of electric is produced from gas fired stations.

Yes, but if you charge your car during the night then wind has made up vast majority of generation during recent nights. During the day more gas is used when demand is higher.

Huh, didn't realise that.

Demand at 4am is about half of that at 7pm, a lot of days there is enough wind to provide that half. Of course it is not windy some days, and wasn't for much of January.
see https://www.smartgriddashboard.com/#all/wind



I know the grid is massively undersized for coping with a significant shift to EV - but if the majority of power at night can come from non gas sources (and the gas stations can be quickly turned on/off - not always a given) then yeah, that would help.

Again, if people charge at home then the grid can cope fine, as the car is not using more than ovens, tumble driers etc that are not typically in use at 4am. You don't need a fast charger during the night, you can charge in 2 or 3 hours, while you sleep. The ability of the grid to provide a load of rapid charging points on the road is an issue.

On an aside, if you wanted to flee Kyiv in recent days an electric car might not be ideal.
[/quote]

until you can buy a 2nd hand electric car for 1000 euro, there will not be mass adoption

traditional mechanics can't fix them either so if it breaks down, they rob you for parts, updates and labor

a tesla can be 1200 a month and you don't even own the car, crazy  ::)

manfromdelmonte

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #38 on: February 27, 2022, 03:16:02 PM »
solar panels on your roof will charge a car almost for free
or charge up a battery which you can use to run most low level stuff in house

night rate on the meter much cheaper for car charging too and then turn on your appliances too - washer, dishwasher,

LeoMc

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #39 on: February 27, 2022, 03:28:50 PM »
What is the cost (ball park) forgetting and fitting solar panels?
I assume there are no grants currently.

JimStynes

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #40 on: February 27, 2022, 06:17:20 PM »
Diesel 159.1 today in Lurgan. Ridiculous

Milltown Row2

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #41 on: February 27, 2022, 06:21:46 PM »
Diesel 159.1 today in Lurgan. Ridiculous
Never noticed when I was in there this morning!
None of us are getting out of here alive, so please stop treating yourself like an after thought. Ea

manfromdelmonte

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #42 on: February 28, 2022, 11:19:55 PM »
What is the cost (ball park) forgetting and fitting solar panels?
I assume there are no grants currently.
There are grants, yes. Just not for batteries.

Armagh18

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #43 on: March 01, 2022, 09:35:42 AM »
Yep. Our own fields.
Price of oil will make solar/electric cars more viable

Will it?

~35% of electric is produced from gas fired stations.

Yes, but if you charge your car during the night then wind has made up vast majority of generation during recent nights. During the day more gas is used when demand is higher.

Huh, didn't realise that.

Demand at 4am is about half of that at 7pm, a lot of days there is enough wind to provide that half. Of course it is not windy some days, and wasn't for much of January.
see https://www.smartgriddashboard.com/#all/wind



I know the grid is massively undersized for coping with a significant shift to EV - but if the majority of power at night can come from non gas sources (and the gas stations can be quickly turned on/off - not always a given) then yeah, that would help.

Again, if people charge at home then the grid can cope fine, as the car is not using more than ovens, tumble driers etc that are not typically in use at 4am. You don't need a fast charger during the night, you can charge in 2 or 3 hours, while you sleep. The ability of the grid to provide a load of rapid charging points on the road is an issue.

On an aside, if you wanted to flee Kyiv in recent days an electric car might not be ideal.

until you can buy a 2nd hand electric car for 1000 euro, there will not be mass adoption

traditional mechanics can't fix them either so if it breaks down, they rob you for parts, updates and labor

a tesla can be 1200 a month and you don't even own the car, crazy  ::)
[/quote] Yeah the price of buying and maintaining them will stop the average person buying one for a few years yet but once they start becoming realistically affordable for the masses, electric cars are the way things are going.

armaghniac

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Re: The next recession
« Reply #44 on: March 02, 2022, 05:08:02 PM »
Irish government finances showed a surplus in February and that is before all the Covid payments were stopped.
This whole war thing is going to dampen the economies of the whole world, but at least Ireland is in decent shape coming into it.
If at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B